Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)

Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)

New York Times bestseller! A 12-Month Plan to Financial Freedom"A terrifically informative and thoughtful book." - Gretchen Rubin, bestselling author of The Happiness Project and The Four TendenciesIn this essential handbook—a blend of Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Happiness Project—the co-host of the wildly popular InvestED podcast shares her yearlong journey learning to inv...

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Title:Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)
Author:Danielle Town
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Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad) Reviews

  • Jim

    This book is written from the point of view of the novice learning at the foot of the master. In this case, a very bright, educated daughter has finally figured out that she has to make her money work as hard for her as she worked to get that money. And, even though her father has a reputation for being a financial guru, she had no idea how to make her money work that hard until she started talking to him about what he does for a living.

    It's a pretty cute and well-tried theme when adult children

    This book is written from the point of view of the novice learning at the foot of the master. In this case, a very bright, educated daughter has finally figured out that she has to make her money work as hard for her as she worked to get that money. And, even though her father has a reputation for being a financial guru, she had no idea how to make her money work that hard until she started talking to him about what he does for a living.

    It's a pretty cute and well-tried theme when adult children decide it's time to give their parents a little bit of credit for knowing something that they don't. The conversational exchanges go tangential to "growing up memories" where family interactions that we all have are laid bare--in this case, both sides get to give their version of what happened in those growing up memories. And, it's a good thing when the confronting of that conflict occurs in an atmosphere of common sense, good judgment, and adult behavior. Throw in a little empathy by each party and have an audience who can identify with father/daughter interactions can lead to an enjoyable read where you might get an understanding for more than just value investing.

    As stated above, the plot of this book is the "coming of age" of the novice learning these tips of the trade for financial management and investing from the master. Like any other "how-to" book, the description of that "how-to" can read like any reader can enjoy wonderful success if that reader will just follow these simple steps. But, simple doesn't mean easy. Success is not guaranteed.

    Regardless, this is an introductory book describing one method of finding and evaluating stocks from a value investing approach. The prescribed activities for following this method are understandable. The operational steps are clear...there is a pathway and that is what is laid out in this book. If you try this method, then good luck.

    Just to let you know, I've read it twice already.

  • Joséphine (Word Revel)

    is a great book to get readers thinking about their finances, their goals. I loved the approach Danielle took to outlining her financial journey, how it impacted other ares of her life and the lessons that she learnt with regards to investing. I listened to it on audio, which helped me get my mind into why investing is so important over simply saving and how to get started. While stocks might not be part of my strategy just yet, I'm sure I'll revisit

    in future

    is a great book to get readers thinking about their finances, their goals. I loved the approach Danielle took to outlining her financial journey, how it impacted other ares of her life and the lessons that she learnt with regards to investing. I listened to it on audio, which helped me get my mind into why investing is so important over simply saving and how to get started. While stocks might not be part of my strategy just yet, I'm sure I'll revisit

    in future. I'll then look to a print edition or the ebook, so I can sit down and work out the numbers as I reread.

    On a personal note, like Danielle, I grew up with my dad constantly telling me about the importance of investing. He kept telling me that working a full time job alone, wasn't going to do me favours financially. Like Danielle, I didn't actually believe that investing was for me but I've come to a point that I've realised that it's not such a stretch after all, and I am capable of learning and going down that road too. With that parallel, I felt even more connected, which in turn made me feel like book was very applicable to me as well.

  • Tabs

    Lots of good info but it was unnerving trying to learn from this book. I found it difficult to trust Danielle's credibility, given that she had also just come to grips with these concepts. Strange mix between investing education and a narrative of her love-life. Full disclosure: I'm a loyal subscriber to the podcast and have given an additional star because of that.

  • Ran

    This is my new to-go investing book. Danielle Town has a real ability to present financial information in laymen's terms that I understand. We also both have fathers who desperately want their children to learn to invest. Easy to understand, practical advice on investing with a perspective I also totally understand - I just wish the editors made her get rid of this little "foin" she uses for embellishment. I think I'm going to buy several copies for my siblings.

  • Gina

    An interesting memoir and crash course in value investing. The book is inspiring in that you read about Danielle Town being a completely incompetent dimwit and typical millennial in the realm of personal finance and investing to being a confident investor. The first half of the book is tough to get through as you wonder how a father raised such a stereotypical, Barbie "math is hard" millennial child and her resistance to learn is grating. The second half of the book is an easier read once she le

    An interesting memoir and crash course in value investing. The book is inspiring in that you read about Danielle Town being a completely incompetent dimwit and typical millennial in the realm of personal finance and investing to being a confident investor. The first half of the book is tough to get through as you wonder how a father raised such a stereotypical, Barbie "math is hard" millennial child and her resistance to learn is grating. The second half of the book is an easier read once she leaves the vapid bimbo qualities (though not the petulance) behind.

  • Jay

    I recently read Phil Town’s “Rule One”. In that book, Town repeatedly tells the reader that he has a simple system to pick winning stocks, but then describes the system using dozens of sub topics, optional research topics, and arcane history. Town’s one rule is actually a complex system, and while I enjoyed the way the system was presented, with history tied to famous value investors, it’s use seems quite time consuming.

    I read this book, not initially understanding that this is a kind of walk t

    I recently read Phil Town’s “Rule One”. In that book, Town repeatedly tells the reader that he has a simple system to pick winning stocks, but then describes the system using dozens of sub topics, optional research topics, and arcane history. Town’s one rule is actually a complex system, and while I enjoyed the way the system was presented, with history tied to famous value investors, it’s use seems quite time consuming.

    I read this book, not initially understanding that this is a kind of walk thru of Town’s process, using his daughter as the voice. I found this much more compelling than Town’s original book. The process seems more reasonable when approached as a new investor, and in this case it doesn’t seem as involved. Mixed in with the story of learning how value investor’s invest is Danielle Town’s story – about her legal career and career re-think, her occasionally strained relationship with her father, and about moves. I enjoyed this book, even though I consider myself beyond this level of learning. I heard enough research suggestions that I can adjust my own process to add a few new ideas. In addition to investing books, I also enjoy books about entrepreneurs, and the story of how Phil Town, in effect, passes his business on to a daughter, was also quite interesting. It starts with the daughter being totally uninterested and uninvolved, but walks through her basic and advanced learning of his system, and her participation in an audio podcast on investing with her father. You can tell what happened at the end of the book, where you are given some advertisement for Danielle Town’s web site and investing services. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

  • Kursad Albayraktaroglu

    Meh - while the writing is lively and interesting, there is not much of substance in this book for anyone who already read one or two books on investment. It might be a good introduction to the subject, especially for female readers who could connect with the author's story of learning about the basics of investing as a young woman.

    For anyone else, the actual investment-related content is not that much, and reading the books of the author's father (such as the "#1 Rule") would be a better use

    Meh - while the writing is lively and interesting, there is not much of substance in this book for anyone who already read one or two books on investment. It might be a good introduction to the subject, especially for female readers who could connect with the author's story of learning about the basics of investing as a young woman.

    For anyone else, the actual investment-related content is not that much, and reading the books of the author's father (such as the "#1 Rule") would be a better use of your time. The next edition of the book could benefit from less Nuno (

    ) and more finance.

    Two stars, primarily for the writing style; but the book will probably only be useful to absolute novices in investing (

    ).

  • Eric

    This book represents another attempt to cash in on the fame of Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger by repackaging their investment philosophy under the guise of a "heartwarming" story about rapprochement between father and daughter. The author's try-hard, juvenile writing style contains such neologisms as "foin" (viz. "fine"), intermittent use of all-caps (e.g., MATH), and plenty of Randomly Capitalized Expressions to show you what a cool, hip Millenial she really is. We are also treated to pages

    This book represents another attempt to cash in on the fame of Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger by repackaging their investment philosophy under the guise of a "heartwarming" story about rapprochement between father and daughter. The author's try-hard, juvenile writing style contains such neologisms as "foin" (viz. "fine"), intermittent use of all-caps (e.g., MATH), and plenty of Randomly Capitalized Expressions to show you what a cool, hip Millenial she really is. We are also treated to pages of detail about the author's intercontinental love interest (the relevance of this budding romantic relationship to the process of evaluating common stocks is never quite explained).

    While the book does contain a decent overview of the value investing philosophy and some practical guidance on how to begin learning the technical aspects of company valuation, novice investors would be better served by going to the primary sources - Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger - who have generously made the vast majority of their work available online at no cost to the reader.

  • Esther

    There is some helpful advice and principles, but they are very basic. And I couldn’t help but be annoyed at the petulance of the author. The actual investing content is very minimal, while the author’s life story and problems are extensively elaborated. I’m sure it’s helpful for those new to investing, but I can’t help thinking there’s books that lay out investing basics better than this one.

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