Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)

Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)

New York Times bestseller! A 12-Month Plan to Financial Freedom"A terrifically informative and thoughtful book." - Gretchen Rubin, bestselling author of The Happiness Project and The Four TendenciesIn this essential handbook—a blend of Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Happiness Project—the co-host of the wildly popular InvestED podcast shares her yearlong journey learning to inv...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad)
Author:Danielle Town
Rating:

Invested: How Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Taught Me to Master My Mind, My Emotions, and My Money (with a Little Help from My Dad) Reviews

  • Liz

    So impressed with this book! Genuine and insightful. The lessons are great and gave me the confidence needed for long term investing.

  • Misty

    This book had me at Warren Buffet. I love reading about other people's perspectives with this individual

  • Ivan Kules

    Great story told in a really simple and easy way. I recommend it to all investing noobs. Nice way to start a long life in investment :)

  • Jim

    This book is written from the point of view of the novice learning at the foot of the master. In this case, a very bright, educated daughter has finally figured out that she has to make her money work as hard for her as she worked to get that money. And, even though her father has a reputation for being a financial guru, she had no idea how to make her money work that hard until she started talking to him about what he does for a living.

    It's a pretty cute and well-tried theme when adult children

    This book is written from the point of view of the novice learning at the foot of the master. In this case, a very bright, educated daughter has finally figured out that she has to make her money work as hard for her as she worked to get that money. And, even though her father has a reputation for being a financial guru, she had no idea how to make her money work that hard until she started talking to him about what he does for a living.

    It's a pretty cute and well-tried theme when adult children decide it's time to give their parents a little bit of credit for knowing something that they don't. The conversational exchanges go tangential to "growing up memories" where family interactions that we all have are laid bare--in this case, both sides get to give their version of what happened in those growing up memories. And, it's a good thing when the confronting of that conflict occurs in an atmosphere of common sense, good judgment, and adult behavior. Throw in a little empathy by each party and have an audience who can identify with father/daughter interactions can lead to an enjoyable read where you might get an understanding for more than just value investing.

    As stated above, the plot of this book is the "coming of age" of the novice learning these tips of the trade for financial management and investing from the master. Like any other "how-to" book, the description of that "how-to" can read like any reader can enjoy wonderful success if that reader will just follow these simple steps. But, simple doesn't mean easy. Success is not guaranteed.

    Regardless, this is an introductory book describing one method of finding and evaluating stocks from a value investing approach. The prescribed activities for following this method are understandable. The operational steps are clear...there is a pathway and that is what is laid out in this book. If you try this method, then good luck.

    Just to let you know, I've read it twice already.

  • Joséphine (Word Revel)

    is a great book to get readers thinking about their finances, their goals. I loved the approach Danielle took to outlining her financial journey, how it impacted other ares of her life and the lessons that she learnt with regards to investing. I listened to it on audio, which helped me get my mind into why investing is so important over simply saving and how to get started. While stocks might not be part of my strategy just yet, I'm sure I'll revisit

    in future

    is a great book to get readers thinking about their finances, their goals. I loved the approach Danielle took to outlining her financial journey, how it impacted other ares of her life and the lessons that she learnt with regards to investing. I listened to it on audio, which helped me get my mind into why investing is so important over simply saving and how to get started. While stocks might not be part of my strategy just yet, I'm sure I'll revisit

    in future. I'll then look to a print edition or the ebook, so I can sit down and work out the numbers as I reread.

    On a personal note, like Danielle, I grew up with my dad constantly telling me about the importance of investing. He kept telling me that working a full time job alone, wasn't going to do me favours financially. Like Danielle, I didn't actually believe that investing was for me but I've come to a point that I've realised that it's not such a stretch after all, and I am capable of learning and going down that road too. With that parallel, I felt even more connected, which in turn made me feel like book was very applicable to me as well.

  • Sarah Afflerbach

    I've read all her Dad's books on value investing and loved them, (Phil Town) but this book really was a primer on how to start a value investing practice in a much more straightforward way because she is telling her own story. She approaches the information in a very understandable way and the PDF attachment is now part of my investing homework.

    I also loved that she shared her personal journey of limiting beliefs about her parents divorce and money in general. The idea that we limit ourselves in

    I've read all her Dad's books on value investing and loved them, (Phil Town) but this book really was a primer on how to start a value investing practice in a much more straightforward way because she is telling her own story. She approaches the information in a very understandable way and the PDF attachment is now part of my investing homework.

    I also loved that she shared her personal journey of limiting beliefs about her parents divorce and money in general. The idea that we limit ourselves in so many ways we don't even recognize is very powerful. Once we talk about those past hurts and begin to free ourselves, it opens us up to new possibilities, as she shares in the book.

    Now to see if we can all go from $40,000 to retirement in 9 years!

  • Wallis Chan

    a good intro to investing book for the millennials.

  • Gina

    An interesting memoir and crash course in value investing. The book is inspiring in that you read about Danielle Town being a completely incompetent dimwit and typical millennial in the realm of personal finance and investing to being a confident investor. The first half of the book is tough to get through as you wonder how a father raised such a stereotypical, Barbie "math is hard" millennial child and her resistance to learn is grating. The second half of the book is an easier read once she le

    An interesting memoir and crash course in value investing. The book is inspiring in that you read about Danielle Town being a completely incompetent dimwit and typical millennial in the realm of personal finance and investing to being a confident investor. The first half of the book is tough to get through as you wonder how a father raised such a stereotypical, Barbie "math is hard" millennial child and her resistance to learn is grating. The second half of the book is an easier read once she leaves the vapid bimbo qualities (though not the petulance) behind.

  • Esther

    There is some helpful advice and principles, but they are very basic. And I couldn’t help but be annoyed at the petulance of the author. The actual investing content is very minimal, while the author’s life story and problems are extensively elaborated. I’m sure it’s helpful for those new to investing, but I can’t help thinking there’s books that lay out investing basics better than this one.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.