Soulful Simplicity: How Living with Less Can Lead to So Much More

Soulful Simplicity: How Living with Less Can Lead to So Much More

Courtney Carver shows us the power of simplicity to improve our health, build more meaningful relationships, and relieve stress in our professional and personal lives.We are often on a quest for more--we give in to pressure every day to work more, own more, and do more. For Carver, this constant striving had to come to a stop when she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis...

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Title:Soulful Simplicity: How Living with Less Can Lead to So Much More
Author:Courtney Carver
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Edition Language:English

Soulful Simplicity: How Living with Less Can Lead to So Much More Reviews

  • Megan Ericson

    The author sent me an advanced copy of this book before I interviewed her on my podcast. I can honestly say I loved it! The book is full of love, peace, and forgiveness. I've read many decluttering books and books about simplifying your life, but this one stands out not for the “how” of simplifying our lives, but for the “why.”

    There are decluttering tips in the book, but it’s much more about the how to deal with the emotional side of letting go, which can often be the hardest part. Clearing out

    The author sent me an advanced copy of this book before I interviewed her on my podcast. I can honestly say I loved it! The book is full of love, peace, and forgiveness. I've read many decluttering books and books about simplifying your life, but this one stands out not for the “how” of simplifying our lives, but for the “why.”

    There are decluttering tips in the book, but it’s much more about the how to deal with the emotional side of letting go, which can often be the hardest part. Clearing out our clutter and slowing down our schedules is much more about re-training your heart to know what it really needs rather than just saying no or filling a trash can.

    My favorites parts of the book:

    - Courtney’s MS diagnosis and everyone’s wake up call

    - The need for momma’s to practice self-care

    - Courtney’s “heart practice”

    - Capsule wardrobes, Project 333 and the benefits of paring down your clothing

    - Having a “Simplicity Summit” with your spouse

    - Boycotting busy

    - Unrounded kids (not overscheduling your little ones)

    - What it means to Sabbath

    Favorite quotes from the book:

    - "Clutter attracts clutter and calm attracts calm."

    - "I'm not opposed to owning things, but looking back, I see that everything I owned, owned me back."

    - "When guilt is attached to holding on, the only remedy is to let go."

    - "I refuse to live in fear of not having enough."

    - "Busyness has become more pervasive than clutter in complicating our lives."

  • Amy

    embraces the power in simplicity and it is done effectively through Carver’s own journey towards a simpler life.

    If you aren’t familiar with Courtney, she is the creator of the Project 333,

    a few years ago. Her journey towards this simpler life began with her MS diagnosis and the need to scale down her life, home, and belongings

    embraces the power in simplicity and it is done effectively through Carver’s own journey towards a simpler life.

    If you aren’t familiar with Courtney, she is the creator of the Project 333,

    a few years ago. Her journey towards this simpler life began with her MS diagnosis and the need to scale down her life, home, and belongings in order to make her health a priority.  Through this journey she discovered how wonderful the practice of minimalism is and how powerful it can be for everyone, even if you haven’t been faced with health issues.

    Carver tackles the art of saying no, the rejection of busy, the whittling of clutter, the beauty in a smaller wardrobe, and so much more.  Her lifestyle and message speaks loudly during this time of resolutions and serves as a great reminder, to those that are already pursuing a minimalist life, that there is always an opportunity to do better with what we have.

  • Kathy Peterman

    I love that Courtney Carver takes a deep dive into her life before and after she discovered simplicity. She brings us along with her, allowing us to honor our own unique journey as we see ourselves in her story and the lessons along the way. It's a book about the why and how simplicity is not just decluttering our physical things. It's about decluttering our health, our schedules and commitments, relationships and old beliefs to make room for what's important to us. It's about the richness of li

    I love that Courtney Carver takes a deep dive into her life before and after she discovered simplicity. She brings us along with her, allowing us to honor our own unique journey as we see ourselves in her story and the lessons along the way. It's a book about the why and how simplicity is not just decluttering our physical things. It's about decluttering our health, our schedules and commitments, relationships and old beliefs to make room for what's important to us. It's about the richness of living this life fully as compared to working so hard we go numb, rest on the weekends, and repeat.

    A funny side effect from reading this book is that I realized how much I hang onto the past in photos, cassette tapes, CDs, and DVDs. Carver helped me realize that sometimes we hang onto to the good times for fear there won't be more. I now feel ready to honor my past by doing a victory road trip, listening to the songs and memories, releasing them and then go about creating more wonderful memories now! It's really a book about living your life fully now with tips on how to start that process.

  • Libby

    What a fantastic book by Courtney Carver! I listened to the audio book read by the author. Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2006, Courtney says the disease put her on the path to simplicity when she realized how much stress her lifestyle was creating. I could relate so much to being stressed by your lifestyle. Our materialistic culture supports our mad rush to have things and becomes the yardstick by which we not only measure ourselves but others. People will not see us as successful if we d

    What a fantastic book by Courtney Carver! I listened to the audio book read by the author. Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2006, Courtney says the disease put her on the path to simplicity when she realized how much stress her lifestyle was creating. I could relate so much to being stressed by your lifestyle. Our materialistic culture supports our mad rush to have things and becomes the yardstick by which we not only measure ourselves but others. People will not see us as successful if we don’t have the nice house we’ve always dreamed of, the latest clothes, shoes, and accessories, and our children have to measure up with name brand clothes and technology devices, go to the right schools and mingle with the right people. It’s a lot of pressure!

    I’ve been downsizing for a few years now and I have a sister who lives a minimalist lifestyle. Even so, it was uplifting to be reminded of so many of the tenets of this way of life. How easy it is to let materialism creep back in, and how easy it is to start wanting more stuff. Carver absolutely has a point that if you have more stuff, more time is given to taking care of that stuff. I love Carver’s hand over your heart techniques, her project 333 (hope to work toward that), and her decluttering advice. More than anything, I love her soulful knowing about the most important things in life and how to live a life with more of that and less things.

    Carver says, “Forgetting who you are and living outside your heart is painful. Do whatever it takes to come back and be more you. Give yourself all the space, time, and love you need to remember who your are.” What a true gem this book is, the words of the author feel as though she’s speaking from her heart. Highly recommended!

  • Jen

    ~SIMPLIFY~

    I have shared with you before that like many people in this day and age, I'm on a journey to simplify. Simplify my house, simplify my life, simplify my schedule, simplify my mind. There's too much STUFF taking up too much SPACE that sucks away from LIFE. Anyone else feel this way? Soulful Simplicity is another book I've recently read on this journey. Like other books in this category, Soulful Simplicity draws from other sources as well as the authors own. People in this day and age are

    ~SIMPLIFY~

    I have shared with you before that like many people in this day and age, I'm on a journey to simplify. Simplify my house, simplify my life, simplify my schedule, simplify my mind. There's too much STUFF taking up too much SPACE that sucks away from LIFE. Anyone else feel this way? Soulful Simplicity is another book I've recently read on this journey. Like other books in this category, Soulful Simplicity draws from other sources as well as the authors own. People in this day and age are often on a quest for more and the author was on this path as well. Courtney Carver was constantly striving for more until she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis and she needed to de-stress her life to improve her symptoms. She shares her journey in this book, gives helpful tips for those on their own journey, and motivates the reader to pare down the excess and live life abundantly. This book was interesting, as I enjoyed hearing the authors story, and motivated me to continue on this journey. For me, this was ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 stars (rounded up from 3.5).

  • Laura Leaney

    I read this as part inspiration, part preparation, for my intended summer clean-a-thon. I didn't want to read Kondo's book about debating the joyfulness of every object, so I chose Carver's instead. I have to say, as these kinds of books go, it worked. Although I'm not quite prepared, I'm inspired.

    I need to feel lighter. Sadly, I know part of the problem. Books. I love them, but keeping them is making me claustrophobic. I think I might have to say bon voyage to my little paper children.

    I don't

    I read this as part inspiration, part preparation, for my intended summer clean-a-thon. I didn't want to read Kondo's book about debating the joyfulness of every object, so I chose Carver's instead. I have to say, as these kinds of books go, it worked. Although I'm not quite prepared, I'm inspired.

    I need to feel lighter. Sadly, I know part of the problem. Books. I love them, but keeping them is making me claustrophobic. I think I might have to say bon voyage to my little paper children.

    I don't need so much stuff, and my closets (all three of them) are full of things I haven't seen in years. It's hard to believe how much money all this waste adds up to, but I'll take the author's advice and get past the guilt.

    This book offers some good techniques on

    to get rid of all your accumulated stuff while also attempting to address the

    of it. I admit to skimming the latter parts. I'm not a hoarder, and I don't invest objects with deep meaning, so whatever caused my closet-stuffing is probably related to apathy and convenience. I also believe she's right to think that many people shop out of boredom or to fill some of life's emptiness.

  • Chantal

    Een zeer inspirerend boek voor elk van ons die wat wil minderen en gewoon terug wil naar een simpel leven. Ook haar blog “Be more with less” is een aanrader. Ik doop alvast deze “soulful simplicity” voor mezelf om naar “simpel contentement”. Daar ga ik voor☺

    Een zeer inspirerend boek voor elk van ons die wat wil minderen en gewoon terug wil naar een simpel leven. Ook haar blog “Be more with less” is een aanrader. Ik doop alvast deze “soulful simplicity” voor mezelf om naar “simpel contentement”. Daar ga ik voor☺️

  • Donna

    This is one of those books that I'm not quite sure what to focus on. It felt like it belonged in two separate categories. If this was just an autobiography, I could rate this 3.5 and I'd be okay rounding up to 4 stars. I liked her personal story and I could appreciate her navigation of MS, single parenting and a new marriage.

    But then it was also a self-help kind of book about gaining simplicity in life. That part didn't really grab me. She was a shopoholic, accrued debt, kept up with the Joneses

    This is one of those books that I'm not quite sure what to focus on. It felt like it belonged in two separate categories. If this was just an autobiography, I could rate this 3.5 and I'd be okay rounding up to 4 stars. I liked her personal story and I could appreciate her navigation of MS, single parenting and a new marriage.

    But then it was also a self-help kind of book about gaining simplicity in life. That part didn't really grab me. She was a shopoholic, accrued debt, kept up with the Joneses, etc. and explained how she pulled away from materialism because her wake up call came in the form of an MS diagnosis.

    I couldn't identify with that because I'm none of those things. I hate shopping and debt and I don't feel the need to collect stuff or to live outside my means. I think a section on community and/or service would have been welcomed because this was a little too 'me, me, me', as far as self help goes.

    I'm glad she has found her quiet space and the contentment that goes with that, so 3 stars.

  • Jess

    Good, though others who have read a lot of simplicity and mindfulness books might find this basic.

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