Charming the Vicar

Charming the Vicar

Finnian Kane, famous master of illusion, mentalist, and renowned atheist, has a crisis of faith after her sister’s death. She rents a cottage in the village of Axedale in Kent, desperately trying to find a safe haven from the intrusive media to grieve and work out how to move on. The Reverend Bridget Claremont makes it her mission to help the enigmatic Finnian find her fai...

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Title:Charming the Vicar
Author:Jenny Frame
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Edition Language:English

Charming the Vicar Reviews

  • Kara

    “Charming the Vicar (Axedale #2)” is the sequel to “Courting the Countess”, and is a far better book. The characters are much (much!) more complex and well-developed, the story is interesting, the angst actually makes sense, and the current-day battle for LGBT acceptance by the Church of England was put in human terms wonderfully.

    I didn’t like “Courting the Countess” much; Countess Harry was annoying, housekeeper, now Lady, Annie was too perfect to be real, and their becoming a loving couple fel

    “Charming the Vicar (Axedale #2)” is the sequel to “Courting the Countess”, and is a far better book. The characters are much (much!) more complex and well-developed, the story is interesting, the angst actually makes sense, and the current-day battle for LGBT acceptance by the Church of England was put in human terms wonderfully.

    I didn’t like “Courting the Countess” much; Countess Harry was annoying, housekeeper, now Lady, Annie was too perfect to be real, and their becoming a loving couple felt contrived. But I was intrigued by two characters introduced: motorcycle jacket, leather miniskirt, high heels and red lipstick wearing village Vicar Bridget Claremont (Bridge), and rugged butch farmer Sam McQuade (Quade).

    As one might guess from the title, “Charming the Vicar” is the story of 36yo Vicar Bridge. And what a story it is. Bridge loves being Vicar, loves God, loves the people in the village of Axedale, but is afraid of ever again loving another person after her heart was broken years ago.

    At 27yo, famous magician, atheist and butch lesbian player Finnian Kane (Finn) arrives in the village a broken woman after the death of her beloved younger sister. Desperately wanting to believe her sister is in a better place after listening to her die terrified of there not being an after-life, she feels confused and guilty over what she believes of atheism, and what she now wishes she could believe. She hides out in Axedale to escape paparazzi while she grieves and considers what to do with her life.

    The initial meeting between our MCs doesn’t go smoothly. Bridge is surprised at her reaction to the handsome woman opening the cottage door:

    For her part, Finn wants nothing to do with the hot vicar inviting her to church:

    Through alternating POVs, we see attraction for each other warring with each of them fighting the attraction as they challenge each other to heal. Bridge challenges Finn to face the things she’s lost, her sister, her faith in God, and her love for magic. Finn challenges Bridge to tear down walls she’s built around her, and within herself. Finn tells Bridge:

    Well, perhaps Quade recognized it first, but our MCs are definitely each others type, and their paths to mutual recognition, experimentation, acceptance and commitment makes for a wonderful story. Throughout the story it’s very fun to see Bridget’s long buried dominant kink persona reassert itself, as she battles her need to be celibate to keep her job as Vicar, with her need to be the passionate dominant woman she is.

    When Finn confesses that with Carrie’s death,

    Watching cocky butch Finn cede control to Bridge and accept being taken care of was very well done; with Bridge’s love Finn finds happiness and is no longer angry at God and the world. With Finn's help, Bridge finally recognizes that she can both love God and accept herself as a passionate powerful woman. “Charming the Vicar” does a fantastic job addressing the issue that people should not be forced to make a choice between love, sex and God, and that no religion should demand that anyone make such a choice. As the Church of England seeks to demand such a choice by her, Bridge says:

    I don’t remember ever reading/hearing of God being spoken of so lovingly in lesfic; I found it very refreshing to be reminded that it’s people and institutions run by people that promote hate, not God.

    This is a love story where I believed that the characters fell in love, and are better people being together. Also, as you might guess from Bridge’s love of dominance and kink, the sexual tension and the sexual play between Bridge and Finn is seriously entertaining! Narrator Nicola Victoria Vincent did a fantastic job with “Charming the Vicar”, and made me want to visit Axedale and spend time with the friendly people of the wonderful village. Apparently, there’s only one unattached lesbian left in the village, and with the third book in the “ Axedale” series, “Royal Court”, due to be published December 2018, I hope to learn who it is that Quade finds to join a butch farmer in married life. I certainly hope the audiobook will follow quickly!

    5* well-earned stars for “Charming the Vicar”; it really is a very sexy, touching and entertaining story that reminds us that

  • Luce

    3 Stars

    I had a hard time deciding how to rate this book. I was so looking forward to this book - I loved Courting the Countess and the introduction to Bridget Claremont, the Vicar and the Countess Harry's best friend. I've enjoyed all of Frame's books -going back to her online fiction.

    This one is my least favorite of her published books. Frame's books are all readable and well written, and so is this one. I was happy to hear this would feature the Reverend Bridget, a leather wearing, lesbian Vic

    3 Stars

    I had a hard time deciding how to rate this book. I was so looking forward to this book - I loved Courting the Countess and the introduction to Bridget Claremont, the Vicar and the Countess Harry's best friend. I've enjoyed all of Frame's books -going back to her online fiction.

    This one is my least favorite of her published books. Frame's books are all readable and well written, and so is this one. I was happy to hear this would feature the Reverend Bridget, a leather wearing, lesbian Vicar. She was a great friend to Harry and I liked her in that book. However, I didn't like her as much in this book and I really didn't feel the romance between her and the Magician, Finnian Kane. Bridget calls Finnian "Boy" constantly - I believe even before they had any relationship. It just felt off and made me cringe every time. Its one of those things that I have no explanation as to why I felt this way. . Otherwise I liked each of their back stories.

    Hopefully there is a book 3 featuring Quade.

  • Dreaming

    I have mixed feelings about Jenny Frame's books. I've listened to two of them as an audiobook and the each of the narrators greatly influenced my enjoyment (or the lack of it).

    I picked up Charming the Vicar as I liked Courting the Countess and Bridge's character in it, but she was a very different person in this one.

    Spirituality, religion, bdsm are not really my cup of tea, but as the book progressed I became more and more invested in the story. Many things annoyed me, but my general feeling i

    I have mixed feelings about Jenny Frame's books. I've listened to two of them as an audiobook and the each of the narrators greatly influenced my enjoyment (or the lack of it).

    I picked up Charming the Vicar as I liked Courting the Countess and Bridge's character in it, but she was a very different person in this one.

    Spirituality, religion, bdsm are not really my cup of tea, but as the book progressed I became more and more invested in the story. Many things annoyed me, but my general feeling is good and that's what count in a (romance) book: the way it makes me feel.

    ARC copy received from NetGalley for an honest review

  • Lexxi Kitty

    :

    There are two main point of views, both of the main characters, plus a few occasions when minor characters take over for a moment or three.

    :

    :

    is a 37 year old vicar in Axedale, a village in Kent England. Bridget keeps telling herself and others (mostly Quade) that she wished to have someone to love in her life. That is until someone does enter her life, whereupon Bri

    :

    There are two main point of views, both of the main characters, plus a few occasions when minor characters take over for a moment or three.

    :

    :

    is a 37 year old vicar in Axedale, a village in Kent England. Bridget keeps telling herself and others (mostly Quade) that she wished to have someone to love in her life. That is until someone does enter her life, whereupon Bridget remembers that her bishop is an asshole and having a relationship would possibly cost her her job/position/life.

    : A 27 year old stage magician and entertainer who is quite famous and has done shows all over the world. When the book opens Finn is in the middle of an act. Immediately afterwards she’s to have dinner with ‘the woman who has her heart’ (or however that was worded) – Finn’s sister. Whereupon Finn’s world and existence is shocked out of alignment when she learns about an illness.

    :

    This is by no means an exhaustive list of all minor characters in the book, just a few of importance: Archie Winchester is the grumpy old man who is super conservative and hates having the local titled person, the Earl, be a woman (Harry), and definitely can’t stand that his vicar is a woman (Bridget) – both lesbians at that! Quade McQuade, or ‘call me Quade’, is a ‘local farmer’ who also works as an estate manager at Axedale (the name of Harry and Annie’s house – the Earl . . . residence and land) – Quade is one of the only other single lesbian in Axedale when the story opens. Harry and Annie (with Riley) were the stars of the prior book and are newly married lesbians (with Riley being Annie’s kid).

    :

    Bridget attempts to welcome the newest ‘sheep’ to her village/parish and is constantly rebuffed – sometimes angrily, by this ‘sheep’ aka Finn. In her thoughts Bridget already calls Finn by a word that will later escape into conversation – boy.

    Finn, for her part, is quite taken with Bridget’s legs, but wants nothing to do with the ‘dog collar’ wearing woman, for religion is bad and dumb. For, you see, Finn has made her life escaping from her father and his horrible work, and made something of a career debunking frauds of all colors – including religious. Finn is the ‘newest sheep’ because she’s just now arrived in Axedale to take a breather and try to grieve after the death of her sister.

    Bridget and Finn circle each other – both interested and not interested in the other. Complicating matters is the part where Bridget keeps noting that Finn isn’t her type – and the part where vicars are supposed to be celibate and her boss, the bishop, is a massive bigot.

    :

    Sex occurs. Power games break out.

    :

    I’d like to leave a review that says, in its entirety: The word ‘boy’ is used 103 times in this book, once in the acknowledgement section, once for boyfriend, but most of the time to refer to Finn. But, alas, that’s not fair to myself or the book and so more must be said. I recognize that boi can used by some lesbians in a certain way - specifically referring to the younger person in a age-gap relationship, but boi wasn't used, boy was.

    Bridget is 37 to Finn’s 27. Ten years isn’t a huge age gap, though someone of 37 and someone of 27 are normally at different points in their life. Then again, someone of 37 and someone else of 37 could very well also be at different points in their lives so . . bah. I’m not huge on age gap type stories so I had to overcome that specific aspect.

    Harder to overcome, though, was the constant use of ‘boy’ and Bridget’s constant condescending and degrading actions/attitude toward Finn. Sure, Finn literally has the thought to herself that she’s massively turned on by the condescension and degrading methods of the vicar, but it isn’t easy, for me, to read. To the point that I almost had to just stop reading the book. But, beyond that boy thing, and my constant wonderment at whether I had missed something and Finn was actually either a male and/or transgender in some way, I found the story interesting enough to continue. Though, admittedly, that boy thing kept constantly coming up in ‘good’ scenes and each use of the word would instantly pull me out, shake me like a rapid dog, and beat me with a stick. Needless to say, I did not like that aspect.

    This is the third book that I have read by Jenny Frame, and, unfortunately, this specific book ends up being my least favorite by Frame (though not my least favorite among the 169 Bold Strokes Books I’ve read).

    Rating: 3.50

    December 12 2017

  • Pippa

    3.5 stars

    Finn Kane is a famous illusionist and atheist known for debunking religious performers. When her beloved sister dies, she escapes to a small English town to grieve. No longer interested in fast women, and life in general, it is a shock when she finds herself attracted to the local vicar.

    The Reverend Bridget Claremont is a well-loved vicar in the small parish. She is open about being a lesbian, but it helps when her family has been landed gentry for centuries, and her best friend is the

    3.5 stars

    Finn Kane is a famous illusionist and atheist known for debunking religious performers. When her beloved sister dies, she escapes to a small English town to grieve. No longer interested in fast women, and life in general, it is a shock when she finds herself attracted to the local vicar.

    The Reverend Bridget Claremont is a well-loved vicar in the small parish. She is open about being a lesbian, but it helps when her family has been landed gentry for centuries, and her best friend is the Lady of the Manor. She is welcoming the new arrival, a prickly magician, when she finds the spark of attraction. Not expecting her alter ego, Mistress Black, to make an appearance while she is wearing the vicar’s dog collar, Bridge finds herself trying to come to grips with her past, and her present.

    This is predominantly a sweet romance by Frame. The setting and the events are well settled in the small parish, and focus on the minutiae of village life. Bridge is supportive and caring of her parishioners, and welcomes being an integral part of village life. However, there are moments in which the language doesn’t quite fit the sweet romance genre, and Bridge was a little pricklier than I would have expected from a parish priest.

    There are some quirks though, and they may not suit everyone looking for a sweet lesbian romance.

    The heart of the romance, and it is a romance, is the dominant/submissive relationship between the two main characters. Bridge was Mistress Black in her younger days, and while the D/S is very light, it is built into the connection between the two characters. This is the first sweet romance I’ve ever read in the D/S area, although there are aspects of the more hard core, especially in terms of language within the sex scenes.

    I think if it had been a more complex story, or if it had been a clear sweet romance, it would have been a solid four stars from me. I knocked it down half a star because I think it crossed an unexpected boundary and will be harder to find a happy audience as a result.

    The simple love story required by the sweet romance genre has by necessity reduced the complexity the author has created with the characters and situation presented. Community support for a lesbian vicar may be in the village, but presumably this is the soft and fluffy variety, rather than the Mistress Black variety. It would have been interesting to explore this in a bit more detail within the book. Something else that was simplified was that this was the first time Finn had experienced attraction to a dominatrix, and this could also have been explored in more detail.

    Certainly, the changes in legislation in the UK, and community support for marriage equality now make this book imaginable in a real sense. Frame has used this as an opportunity to venture into the lesbian vicar territory and it’s a very enjoyable book. It is definitely a sweet romance, and lovely light read as a result.

    Advanced reading copy provided by NetGalley for an honest review.

  • Lex Kent

    This is the second book in the Axedale series. I enjoyed book 1

    , so I was looking forward to this. Unfortunately, this book didn’t really appeal to me personally. The writing was decent, but it was more that it wasn’t to my personal tastes. While this is a Book 2 and the characters mingle in both books, this book’s story was contained enough that you would not have to read book 1 first.

    Finn is a famous magician, looking for peace and quiet after losing a loved one. Bridget

    This is the second book in the Axedale series. I enjoyed book 1

    , so I was looking forward to this. Unfortunately, this book didn’t really appeal to me personally. The writing was decent, but it was more that it wasn’t to my personal tastes. While this is a Book 2 and the characters mingle in both books, this book’s story was contained enough that you would not have to read book 1 first.

    Finn is a famous magician, looking for peace and quiet after losing a loved one. Bridget is the Vicar in the small town that Finn is hiding in. When they meet, Bridge can see Finn is really hurting. Bridge wants to help, but Finn pushes her away. As Bridge slowly cracks the walls of Finn, feelings start to become involved. Is there a chance for love for an openly gay Vicar and a magician?

    I liked how this book had a gay woman Vicar, and I was looking forward to reading her story. Unfortunately, the secret side of Bridge, was just a little too unbelievable for me. She seemed like such a sweet woman in the first book, I felt like I was reading a new character. She is constantly trying to put Finn in her place and degrade her, I just didn’t see the appeal.

    The sex scenes were so, so for me. They had the possibility of being really hot and steamy, but it just didn’t work for me. I would also mention there are light BDSM moments. A point Lexxi Kitty brought up in her review, the word “boy” was used by Bridge about Finn over a 100 times. “Boy and not “Boi”. I think it was supposed to be sexy, but it had the opposite effect on me. It was meant more to put down Finn, so it just left me saying huh.

    This wasn’t bad, but it didn’t really work for me. I have a feeling some people might like this more than I did. I seem to be on a bit of a rollercoaster when it comes to books by Frame; lots of ups and downs. There is one character, from this series, who has not found love yet. She seems like a sweetheart, so if Frame writes a book 3, I will read it.

  • Heinerway

    2.5 stars rounded to 3

    Boring. A lesbian vicar and a lesbian magician, while appealing as main characters, do not make this story interesting. Unusual, yes. But boring.

  • Sum

    “Charming the Vicar” is the first book I’ve read from Jenny Frame, and I wanted to read it because of its very interesting premise. This is a romance where you have a vicar, a woman of faith, getting romantically involved with an atheist. I’d never read that before, so I was very intrigued with how this was even going to work. Surprisingly, it worked rather well.

    Full disclosure. Before I get into my in depth review, I want to say that I normally read f/f romances that are femme/femme and women w

    “Charming the Vicar” is the first book I’ve read from Jenny Frame, and I wanted to read it because of its very interesting premise. This is a romance where you have a vicar, a woman of faith, getting romantically involved with an atheist. I’d never read that before, so I was very intrigued with how this was even going to work. Surprisingly, it worked rather well.

    Full disclosure. Before I get into my in depth review, I want to say that I normally read f/f romances that are femme/femme and women who don’t fit a category/label. I have read and enjoyed some f/f romances with androgynous or butch women, but that’s usually not my cup of tea. However, I am trying to be a little more diverse sometimes with lesfic. “Charming the Vicar” was another attempt to branch out of my lesfic comfort zone.

    I’m going to jump straight into the elephant in the room: the religion vs. atheism aspect. Let me just start off by saying that I actually relate to both Finn’s (the atheist) and Bridget’s (the believer) points of view when it comes to religion. On a personal level, I had Christian ministers in my family. My paternal grandmother is an evangelist (no, not the TV kind but just a normal one) who happens to believe in climate change, science, is not a Bible fundamentalist, and does not condemn non straight people to hell for loving who they want to love. Bridget takes a more relaxed, modern approach to her beliefs, and I can relate to that.

    On the flip side, there’s Finn’s beliefs. I can also relate to how she feels. While I never went the atheist route, I have personally been very close to becoming agnostic in the past. It is because of the things that Finn experienced in her childhood (i.e. the fakers using magic tricks to fool believers) that pushed me towards that route once. I considered Finn’s crusade against exposing charlatans who abuse people’s faith for the purpose of money or power a service to humanity. It’s something that I personally detest as well.

    So for me, this book touched me personally because both Bridget and Finn, in terms of their religious views, are 100% relatable to me. That’s one of the things I enjoyed most about “Charming the Vicar.” If some people question Bridget’s relaxed approach and modern thinking to her beliefs, then I’m here to say that she is a realistic character. Just because a person is a woman (or man) of faith, it doesn’t mean they are a fundamentalist Bible thumper. They just don’t have the louder megaphone like the far right. As for Finn, I completely understood why she became atheist as it is 100% realistic as well. With her background, she was likely to become atheist or hold on to her beliefs but take a different path from the mainstream. In this regard, Frame did a fantastic job of really grounding realism with these two characters. I admit I was a little skeptical of how this would be done, but she surprised me with something great, something real.

    I felt like Frame had believable interactions with the two love interests. I liked how their romance was on the slow burn side and that this was one woman Finn couldn’t easily charm into her bed. For the first time, she had to work for it with Bridget. I liked that it wasn’t rushed and there was proper build up in their romance. I also liked that Frame didn’t sweep their fundamental theological differences under the carpet. Like any couple, you have to meet in the middle to make a relationship work, and with Finn and Bridget, it was no different. I felt their common ground was believable and not forced just to make the relationship work for the purpose of a HEA.

    As I have already disclosed, I’m not a butch-femme romance fan. This is usually because I don’t like how some authors make stereotypical roles (top vs. bottom, etc.) so clearly defined in their stories. With “Charming the Vicar,” Frame sort of toyed with this a little yet she didn’t. Allow me to explain. I admit I expected Finn to be the dominant one but she isn’t. That’s fine. I am okay with the femme (Bridget) being the one in control. What I didn’t like is how Bridget expressed her dominance.

    I didn’t expect Bridget to be in the BDSM lifestyle as a domme. Granted, that part of her personality has been dormant since joining the church as a vicar. Personally, I don’t have an issue with her being a domme. She is a vicar and a sexual being, and well...she likes what she likes. But what I didn’t like about Bridget was how she degraded Finn.

    During some of their flirtation and sex play, there were many times where I felt Bridget made Finn feel like she was beneath her. I don’t know much about the BDSM lifestyle, so I don’t know if this is a thing in real life or made up. What I do know is that I had a problem with Bridget talking down to Finn as if she was sex slave and nothing more. Even though Finn found it to be a turn on, it wasn’t sexy to me. There was one sex scene (their first) where I felt Bridget treated Finn like she was a doormat for her expensive heels, and I mean that literally. That made me very uncomfortable and dislike Bridget’s brand of kink. I just felt it was humiliating and Finn didn’t deserve that. In fact, I felt she deserved far better than that.

    I also didn’t like how Bridget constantly referred to Finn as a boy. Yes, I have seen that at least twice before in a butch-femme romance. And no, I don’t know anything about the intricacies of how some butch women want to be addressed. For me, personally, I felt like Bridget used it as an insult to Finn, nearly each and every time. It’s just the way she seemed to deliver it - in her domme, dismissive you’re nothing to me tone. Maybe for some people, they may see it as she’s doing her sexy domme thing, but to me, I didn’t view it that way at all. Finn may be the submissive one in this relationship, but that doesn’t mean she doesn’t deserve respect while Bridget is flirting or making demands as a mistress. There is a fine line where I feel like a domme can be sexy in their dominance without insulting their sub, and Bridget crossed over that line multiple times. And I’m sorry. I just couldn’t get past that.

    Because of these things, my liking of Bridget and even the story lessened. It’s one of the major issues that I wasn’t crazy about while reading “Charming the Vicar.” While there were still other things to like about Bridget, this was one that I absolutely did not like. But well...no one is perfect, even a vicar.

    Frame also fell into the repetitive trap. I can’t tell you how many times Bridget referred to Finn as her little lost sheep. After a while, you start wondering if Bridget is Little Bo-Peep instead of a vicar. There were other instances of repetition, outside of this example, where some proofing and editing could have prevented this issue.

    I also could have done without the obligatory break-up. I have no idea why authors keep writing this. At this point, I just expect it to happen in most romances that I read. Yeah, I guess I understand why they broke up, but if these two had actually

    like adults about their complicated situation, the break up would have been completely unnecessary. But I guess if they don’t break up, you won’t have the dramatic reunion, right?

    Otherwise, I felt Frame did a pretty good job with this story. I enjoyed the supporting characters and the setting of Axedale. There was also this beautiful moment towards the end where Frame reflects the mirror on the dual personas of both Finn and Bridget, and it made me go, wow, when I read that. I felt that part was brilliantly written cause I can appreciate the attention to detail and cleverness. And while I know I complained about some things about Bridget, they did have this one love scene where the emotions were bouncing back and forth between the two. It was well done and somewhat redeemed Bridget (in that particular moment) in regards to how she expresses her domme side.

    Despite all of that, it’s the things that I didn’t like that prevents me from ranking this book higher than I want. I really wish Bridget’s domme side was better written and that Frame didn’t make me feel like Bridget was treating Finn like she was beneath her. Because of that, I had an up and down experience of liking her yet being repelled by some of her domme behavior. I can’t say that you shouldn’t read this book, but if you don’t, that’s understandable as well.

  • MJS

    ARC received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    I wanted to like this, I’d enjoyed the first book, Courting the Countess, and Bridget and Quade were intriguing characters in that book that I assumed would get their own stories. Unfortunately the Bridget from the first story is not the Bridget who shows up here.

    This Bridget is a ‘Mistress’ dressed in vicar’s clothing. Bridget is caring when she’s trying to get Finn to open up, is a wonderful vicar and she loves and is loved by the

    ARC received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    I wanted to like this, I’d enjoyed the first book, Courting the Countess, and Bridget and Quade were intriguing characters in that book that I assumed would get their own stories. Unfortunately the Bridget from the first story is not the Bridget who shows up here.

    This Bridget is a ‘Mistress’ dressed in vicar’s clothing. Bridget is caring when she’s trying to get Finn to open up, is a wonderful vicar and she loves and is loved by the townspeople. She has great friendships with Quade and Harry. But it was like she had a split personality. She cares for her flock, but has no trouble demeaning Finn, and wanting to put her in her place. The juxtaposition drove me nuts.

    As did the overuse of the term ‘boy’ (I wasn’t sure if Frame actually meant ‘boi’) to describe Finn. First of all, that’s a term you should only use to refer to someone who wants to be referred to that way. Bridget does not bother to ascertain this, just uses it at will, and I assume the reader is just supposed to think Finn is fine with this because she’s butch, but whatever.

    Bridget’s ‘secret’ is that she’s into S&M, I don’t mind dom/sub stories, but for some reason the whole ‘Mistress’ thing is a huge turn off for me, so this one left me cold in that area too, I actually skipped the sex scenes because of this.

    I did like that Frame didn’t just hook Quade and Bridget up, although that probably had more to do with being able to make this a longer series, still I liked that in a town of three lesbians, all of them are friends and never wanted to be anything else. Quade gets a lot to do here, and I assume will have her own story (one hopes she gets to retain her current personality in that one). Harry has less to do, but still gets a few pivotal scenes. Overall though, I couldn’t buy into the romance, and most of that was because I only liked Bridget half of the time. 2.5 stars.

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