Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future

Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future

In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity's partners, helpers, and protectors for centuries! Join one of the world's earliest robots, a mechanical bird named Pouli, as...

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Title:Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future
Author:Mairghread Scott
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future Reviews

  • Rosemary

    The latest volume of Science Comics takes a deeper look at robots. With Poulli, a birdlike robot that's also the first machine to ever fly through the sky (back in 350 BCE!), as our guide, readers get a guided tour through the history of robotics, and learn what is versus what isn't a robot. New, programmable coffeemakers? Robots! Remote-controlled cars - not really. Kids get a refresher on simple machines (levels and pulleys) and how those simple concepts formed the building blocks for more com

    The latest volume of Science Comics takes a deeper look at robots. With Poulli, a birdlike robot that's also the first machine to ever fly through the sky (back in 350 BCE!), as our guide, readers get a guided tour through the history of robotics, and learn what is versus what isn't a robot. New, programmable coffeemakers? Robots! Remote-controlled cars - not really. Kids get a refresher on simple machines (levels and pulleys) and how those simple concepts formed the building blocks for more complex machines, eventually leading to modern technology, robots, and drones. There's a focus on the good robots and drones can accomplish (for those techno-phobes who see The Terminator as our eventual future) and the human component of computer programming. Isaac Asimov, legendary scientist and science fiction writer who gave us the Three Laws of Robotics, gets some recognition here, too.

    There's a nice shout-out to libraries and after-school programs as places to go to learn more about getting into programming and robotics, and some cool pop culture nods that parents will recognize (Star Trek and KITT from Knight Rider, to name a couple). The artwork features diverse characters putting their learning into practice, and the history of robotics covers diverse areas of the world. Poulli is a friendly, cute guide that will appeal to readers, and the language - as with all Science Comics - is easy to understand but never dumbs down information.

    There's a Hall of Awesome Robots, spotlighting 25 robots from history; a closer look at how drones work, and a glossary of new terms to finish up the volume.

    Me? I immediately add the newest Science Comics to my shopping cart ; they're a great add for my "True Story" nonfiction section, where I put books that may get lost on the actual nonfiction shelves, but will grab attention on their own. Plus, my True Story section is next to my Graphic Novels shelf, so it's a win all around.

  • Pink STREAM

    This book is a great book about robotics, electronics, and drones. LOVED IT! If you already know the concepts it is great to review them with this book because it makes you imagine them easier with the comics. As an example the cartoon about the resistor was pretty cute, the resistor was a guard in a party stopping some of the electricity. If you want to learn about robots and drones this would be a great book to start but don't worry about understanding everything at the first glance. Maybe fir

    This book is a great book about robotics, electronics, and drones. LOVED IT! If you already know the concepts it is great to review them with this book because it makes you imagine them easier with the comics. As an example the cartoon about the resistor was pretty cute, the resistor was a guard in a party stopping some of the electricity. If you want to learn about robots and drones this would be a great book to start but don't worry about understanding everything at the first glance. Maybe first starting from learning the concepts from a course or from the web might be better rather than reading the book. This will help you really understand the book. Or if you are trying to learn you can first read the history parts of this book and after that, as you go along you can do research as you read. As an example when you come to the part about the resistors first search the web about what resistors are, then read the book. That way you will learn many things and concepts. Even though there are many books to learn robots and drones like this one, still the best way to learn about robots and drones is to MAKE YOUR OWN.

  • Maximilian Lee

    I LOVED this book because it was very Very VERY informative. It had TONS of information in it. It was about robots and drones. In this book you go on an adventure with one of the earliest robots, Pouli! He (or she) goes to all of the major robots in history and tells you about them. At the end Pouli gets an UPGRADE.

  • Pop Bop

    The Future Is Now!

    This volume is part of the "Science Comics" series. The series started with some predictable topics - dinosaurs, volcanoes, and so on - but it seems to be expanding to cover less obvious and more "scientific" topics. Upcoming titles address rockets, sharks, and trees, (not all in one book of course, although that could be a good book), which seems to cast the net fairly wide. I mention the series mostly because this "Robots and Drones" book was intriguing and rewarding enough t

    The Future Is Now!

    This volume is part of the "Science Comics" series. The series started with some predictable topics - dinosaurs, volcanoes, and so on - but it seems to be expanding to cover less obvious and more "scientific" topics. Upcoming titles address rockets, sharks, and trees, (not all in one book of course, although that could be a good book), which seems to cast the net fairly wide. I mention the series mostly because this "Robots and Drones" book was intriguing and rewarding enough to make the entire series potentially interesting.

    This book struck me as awfully ambitious. It isn't just photos, drawings and snappy patter. Unusual for a book like this, it has serious and substantive content first and jokey asides later. The tone is an engaging combination of earnest, gung-ho, and into-the-future!, which makes the book, (intentionally I think), both informative and inspirational.

    The layout is comic book style. There are generally three to six full color panels per page. Drawings are comics/realistic and usually illustrate or act out whatever fact or principle is being introduced. Our host/narrator is a bird named Pouli that is modeled after an ancient mechanical bird circa 350 BCE. This amiable guide leads the reader through the history of robotics and drones. Along the way we define what a "robot" is, (which is trickier and more subtle than you might imagine). We look at early robots, simple robots from day-to-day life, (i.e., arguably your coffeemaker and certainly your Roomba vacuum cleaner). We consider the differences among a remote controlled toy car, a computer, and a true robot.

    From there we take a side trip to simple machines of which a robot is constructed, (screw, lever, pulley), and consider automata, (say, the Jacquard loom). This is fairly sophisticated stuff, but it is presented and illustrated clearly. And so it goes - functional components, on-board intelligence, even different levels of programming and language are addressed. Artificial intelligence, robots in popular culture, do-it-yourself robot building, drone racing, "intelligent" houses, Asimov's rules of robotics - the list of topics goes on and on.

    It seems to me that any kid interested in robots, computers, engineering, drones, and the like would find a lot to like in this book. It is kid friendly, what with cheerful Pouli and its clear narrative, but the book is never patronizing. Some jokey/Dummies-style books can be overloaded with dumb jokes and puns and the like, but this book just has occasional "funny" bits that the reader can take or leave depending on his or her taste.

    So, this book was instructive, accessible, and entertaining, and covered a topic that you usually don't see that much, (compared to, say, sharks). I'd feel good about handing this to any budding scientist, or really to any kid interested in how things work.

    (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  • Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    From the publisher ---

    In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.

    From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity's partners, helpers, and protectors for centuries! Join one of the world's earliest robots, a mechanical bird named Pouli, a

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    From the publisher ---

    In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.

    From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity's partners, helpers, and protectors for centuries! Join one of the world's earliest robots, a mechanical bird named Pouli, as he explores where robots came from, how they work, and where they’re going in this informative and hilarious new book! Ever dreamt of building your own best friend? It might be easier than you think!

    Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

    I am a fully-grown woman, a librarian and information junkie who loves and learned from this book. It is so hard to keep kids engaged these days so learning via comic strip seems like a smart way to do it. I recommend this book for every children’s library and any and every child you know as a gift!

    Robots are everywhere – I had no idea that processes in my phone and computers are, in fact, robots. The idea of drones fascinated me, too --- please, Amazon, feel free to drop my order on my balcony with one!!! But, they can also be invasive and kind of scary --- I learned a lot from this book as would your child.

    (There is a whole series of books in the “Science Comics” series – everything from Plagues to The Solar system – they all look wonderful and I have every intention of buying the ENTIRE series – past, present and future – for our library.)

  • OpenBookSociety.com

    Title: SCIENCE COMICS: Robots and Drones – Past, Present, and Future

    Series: Science Comics

    By: Mairghread Scott

    ISBN: 9781626727922

    Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra

    Summary:

    In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.

    From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity’s partners, helpers, and protectors

    Title: SCIENCE COMICS: Robots and Drones – Past, Present, and Future

    Series: Science Comics

    By: Mairghread Scott

    ISBN: 9781626727922

    Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra

    Summary:

    In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.

    From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity’s partners, helpers, and protectors for centuries! Join one of the world’s earliest robots, a mechanical bird named Pouli, as he explores where robots came from, how they work, and where they’re going in this informative and hilarious new book! Ever dreamt of building your own best friend? It might be easier than you think!

    Review:

    This latest installment of Science Comics: Robots and Drones by Mairghread Scott was an interesting and delightful introduction to the history of robots and drones. As with previous books in the Science Comics series, this graphic novel is written for younger readers, though it was perfectly told for this reader, whom has limited knowledge of robots and drones. The use of humour throughout was nice.

    The reader is shown many ways that robots are used in our daily lives. This certainly made me more aware of the quantity of robots in our lives and how convenient they make routine tasks. For example -> there was a dialogue involving Tim and T1M – both performing the same routine task (attaching nuts to bolts) where Tim can only perform the tasks before getting tired and bored, whereas the robot does not have such constraints. We differentiate the tasks assigned to both to make sure:

    “Nowadays, we like to have humans like Tim do complex, creative jobs, like improving our technology. While robots, like T1M help build that technology.”

    Discussions clarifying the difference between Robots and Drones was all encompassing. I would like to think that now I truly do understand the difference! I enjoyed the use of examples to solidify the understanding of what drones are and how they are different from robots in use currently:

    “Of course, a lot of drones are also robots. They get general commands from their humans, but they also perform a lot of functions on their own. The best examples are the rovers NASA has on Mars right now, Spirit and Opportunity.”

    There was terminology new to me and I found the explanations and illustrations that went along with those were easily understood and very entertaining. I found I was fully engaged throughout the reading of this book.

    The Hall of Awesome Robots – 25 Robots you should know. A special section at the end of the book…a very entertaining addition, providing a chronology of robots throughout history from the early 1900’s to present day. The side comments of humour added so much to my enjoyment of the book.

    There is also a section at the end of the book with a brief, yet more in-depth discussion about drones. And then of course, the Glossary, which is a good refresher of the words used throughout the book.

    The illustrations by Jacob Chabot were very good. I really enjoyed the variations between the characters and time periods when discussing robots through the ages.

    All in all, I really enjoyed this edition of Science Comics and recommend it to those wanting to learn more about robots and drones and those just looking to refresh their knowledge.

    *OBS would like to thank the publisher for a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future, by Mairghread Scott, illustrated by Jacob Chabot. 121 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL First Second (Roaring Brook Press), 2018. $13.

    Language: G (0 swears); Mature Content: G; Violence: G.

    BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – ADVISABLE.

    KID APPEAL: HIGH

    This is an interesting explanation about robots and their history. A robotic bird takes the reader on a tour of how robots have historically evolved. Then there is an explanation of what composes

    Science Comics: Robots and Drones: Past, Present, and Future, by Mairghread Scott, illustrated by Jacob Chabot. 121 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL First Second (Roaring Brook Press), 2018. $13.

    Language: G (0 swears); Mature Content: G; Violence: G.

    BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS – ADVISABLE.

    KID APPEAL: HIGH

    This is an interesting explanation about robots and their history. A robotic bird takes the reader on a tour of how robots have historically evolved. Then there is an explanation of what composes a robot. The ethics of robots and where they will fit in our future is covered as well. At the end there is a four page glossary with definitions as well as 25 robots that are well known.

    I usually really like the Science Comic graphic novels, but I didn’t enjoy this one as well. I felt like it briefed over subjects that I thought were interesting like military drones, but spent a lot of time on the make-up of robots. That said the explanations were basic and made complicated ideas easy to understand. The illustrations were well done and helped with the text explanations. I think most kids understand a lot about drones and robots already, so either that will draw them to this book or they will feel like they already know the information and be bored.

    C. Peterson

  • Mary Librarian

    Fun way to learn about robots.

  • Barbara

    3.5. These Science Comics are just about as irresistible as a potato chip from a newly-opened bag. Just like the chip, readers take one book and they find themselves drawn into reading more, more, more. Because the science is depicted in a graphic novel form with plenty of color and panels of different shape, it is easy to understand the concepts being explored in the pages of the books in the series. Here, readers learn quite a lot about robots and drones, which may be likely to change the futu

    3.5. These Science Comics are just about as irresistible as a potato chip from a newly-opened bag. Just like the chip, readers take one book and they find themselves drawn into reading more, more, more. Because the science is depicted in a graphic novel form with plenty of color and panels of different shape, it is easy to understand the concepts being explored in the pages of the books in the series. Here, readers learn quite a lot about robots and drones, which may be likely to change the future. But the book challenges some assumptions they may have about these objects and provides some historical background about early robots. From Pouli, a mechanized bird invented in 350 BCE in Italy and then on to the karakuri ningyo in the 1600s in Japan and all the way to modern times when rovers travel across the terrain of planets and virtual assistants such as Alexa and Siri respond to the voices of their owners, it's clear that robots have been part of our lives longer than we realized and have played a more important role than most of us realize. The book also explores some fears associated with robots and raises ethical questions about artificial intelligence and at what point machines become more than tools. Back matter includes snippets about 25 interesting and noteworthy robots. No matter the age, readers will learn something from this book. I didn't find a single page dry or uninteresting and was fascinated at its contents, even with sections explaining how interested youngsters may get involved in robotics clubs and learn more.

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