Science Comics: Sharks: Nature's Perfect Hunter

Science Comics: Sharks: Nature's Perfect Hunter

For over 400 million years, sharks have been the ocean's top predator! They're vital to our ecosystem, but their importance is often overshadowed by our own fear—even though they hardly ever threaten humans.Dive in for an intimate look at the dynamic hammerhead, infamous great white, primordial megalodon, and the gentle nurse shark, the rare species that will let a scuba d...

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Title:Science Comics: Sharks: Nature's Perfect Hunter
Author:Joe Flood
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Science Comics: Sharks: Nature's Perfect Hunter Reviews

  • Carla Johnson-Hicks

    I love the Science Comics series. I was amazed at the amount of information contained in this graphic novel. Not only were there a lot of facts presented, there were also some great illustrations. There were many facts, information about different species and some history about evolution that I learned from reading this book. The graphic novel layout was appealing and skillfully done so that information was both pictorially and textually available. I can imagine using this resource with reluctan

    I love the Science Comics series. I was amazed at the amount of information contained in this graphic novel. Not only were there a lot of facts presented, there were also some great illustrations. There were many facts, information about different species and some history about evolution that I learned from reading this book. The graphic novel layout was appealing and skillfully done so that information was both pictorially and textually available. I can imagine using this resource with reluctant readers as the pictures would draw one in with their dramatic presentation and encourage the reader to find out more. The non-fiction narrative is tied together with a story about a fictional group of shark seekers, which leads into a discussion about the bad rap sharks have gotten over the years. The classic movie Jaws kicked off shark paranoia back in the mid-1970s. The book talks about most shark bites being accidental, as humans are not a normal food source and they really do not like the taste of us. Readers get a history of sharks from the prehistoric era until the present, with a look at shark physiology. migration patterns, variety, and eating habits. The book also contains a shark family tree and a glossary of terms. Overall a great book for those reluctant readers and those interested in sharks. This book will definitely whet their appetite for further research and information. A wonderful addition to a school, classroom, public or family library. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.

  • Jeimy

    This is my first book from the Science Comics series, but it won't be the last. It is comprehensive, but presented in just the right way to keep young readers engaged.

  • Maximilian Lee

    I LOVED this book because it was very Very VERY informative. It had TONS of information in it. It was about sharks. In this book a fisherman was trying to convince the really really really really really really really really really really CRAZY captain that the great white wasn't the only type of shark. He taught him about all of the types of sharks and what their abilities are. (ALSO A LITTLE RED FISH HELPED HIM HALF OF THE TIME (THE FISH GOT SCARED))

  • Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    From the publisher ---

    For over 400 million years, sharks have been the ocean's top predator! They're vital to our ecosystem, but their importance is often overshadowed by our own fear—even though they hardly ever threaten humans.

    Dive in for an intimate look at the dynamic hammerhead, infamous great white, primordial megalodon, and the gentle nurse shark, the rare species that will let a scuba

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    From the publisher ---

    For over 400 million years, sharks have been the ocean's top predator! They're vital to our ecosystem, but their importance is often overshadowed by our own fear—even though they hardly ever threaten humans.

    Dive in for an intimate look at the dynamic hammerhead, infamous great white, primordial megalodon, and the gentle nurse shark, the rare species that will let a scuba diver pet them! This book is filled to the gills with jaw-dropping illustrations and razor-sharp facts that shed light on these fascinating creatures of the deep, including their undersea terrain, cunning adaptability, and staggering variety.

    Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

    I saw what I THOUGHT was a shark on my honeymoon (it was dolphins. In New Jersey. Who knew that dolphins could be so far north?) and was struck dumb with terror … Jaws was a terrifying movie for me as I was ten years old. So, now I know that sharks are not all horrible, scary cratures and that they are quite fascinating to kids of all ages!

    (There is a whole series of books in the “Science Comics” series – everything from Plagues to The Solar system – they all look wonderful and I have every intention of buying the ENTIRE series – past, present and future – for our library.)

  • Suzanne

    One of the most often visited sections in an elementary school library is that which holds the books on sharks. Young readers are fascinated with these sea creatures in all their various forms. So I can easily predict that the latest Science Comics title will see high circulation rates and probably need replacement quite quickly.

    The book begins with an introduction by marine conservation biologist, Dr. David Shiffman. He tells of his own fascination with sharks and his appreciation for the book

    One of the most often visited sections in an elementary school library is that which holds the books on sharks. Young readers are fascinated with these sea creatures in all their various forms. So I can easily predict that the latest Science Comics title will see high circulation rates and probably need replacement quite quickly.

    The book begins with an introduction by marine conservation biologist, Dr. David Shiffman. He tells of his own fascination with sharks and his appreciation for the book and its contents. The book itself is filled with diagrams and images of the different species of sharks. One scene which will make adults grin in recognition shows a man tossing chum and a shark rising out of the water just as it happened in the movie "Jaws." Other pages show a series of creatures from various time periods all declining to swim in the ocean because there are sharks in there.

    There are incredible facts such as, you are "more likely to be hospitalized for being struck by lightning...than for getting injured by a shark." The part that sharks play in the complex ocean food webs, the range of their sizes (from fitting in the palm of your hand to whale proportions), and pages showing the various orders of sharks within the Superorder Selachimorpha will satisfy those thirsty for details.

    The images and text work well together to illustrate the amazing range of adaptations sharks have developed since their first ancestors appeared (an estimated 400 million years ago). With over 500 species, there are many opportunities for variation. Some species have phosphorescence. Thresher sharks use their tails as whips to stun their prey. Some species like the mako are even warm-blooded. One ability that will captivate readers who enjoy the gross and gruesome shows a shark turning its stomach inside out to expel what it cannot digest.

    Folk lore and pop culture are also included. The Hawaiian legends of shapechanging shark gods, movies such as "Jaws," and the popularity of shark fin soup are all covered. Historic events like the early twentieth century shark attacks (covered in one of the I Survived books by Lauren Tarshis), as well as the more recent survivor story of Bethany Hamilton are also discussed.

    Back matter includes a large spread showing the shark family tree, a glossary, and suggested phrases to use instead of the vilifying "shark attack." At the bottom of the glossary pages are illustrations of various shark egg cases (a.k.a. mermaid's purses).

    Highly recommended for elementary and middle grade readers who enjoy nonfiction and books about animals.

    I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  • Faith Tydings

    This is such an amazing, informative, fun way to introduce sharks, and all there is to know about sharks, to kids. Great book series!

  • Lorie

    This review is for the paperback edition of the title about sharks from the popular Science Comics series. The series offers solid, interesting facts about a topic illustrated and constructed like a comic book or graphic novel. The format appeals to kids, it is a non-threatening way to get kids to love reading about non-fiction topics.

    The shark book delves into typical information on sharks including biology, evolution from ancient times and interesting species and their behavior. It also includ

    This review is for the paperback edition of the title about sharks from the popular Science Comics series. The series offers solid, interesting facts about a topic illustrated and constructed like a comic book or graphic novel. The format appeals to kids, it is a non-threatening way to get kids to love reading about non-fiction topics.

    The shark book delves into typical information on sharks including biology, evolution from ancient times and interesting species and their behavior. It also includes shark legends, myths, and some true stories that may have contributed to the fear modern people have about sharks and swimming in the ocean. It also highlights two problems contributing to dangerous decline in shark populations. The first is overfishing due to fear, sport, and cultures that overfish for “luxury” shark fin soup. It also talks about the “shark exploitation” tourism industry which creates an over contact between humans and sharks.

    Book extras include a traditional word glossary and a picture glossary of different egg shark sacs, a detailed and illustrated shark family tree, and the “Don’t Say Shark Attack” page which highlights some shark friendly language to use when speaking about sharks and their natural behaviors. There is no table of contents or index which would help the reader focus in on a specific topic or help them review a particular section quickly. I believe the format is intended to present like a graphic novel, which you read like fiction-cover to cover. A simple index would be a good addition for serious shark fact readers.

    The illustrated format, the cost effective paperback addition, the great facts about sharks, and the compelling pen, ink and digital illustrations make this an excellent choice for middle grade readers and the libraries that serve them. I would recommend this book for purchase by any school or public library.

    This book was provided by the publisher for professional review by SWON Libraries.

  • Kirsteen

    This was an interesting book. It is a fact book about sharks in the style of a comic book- no photos all drawings. Personally as a teacher, I prefer the traditional fact-file style book as they are clear and useful when teaching children new genres. However, I can imagine certain children loving this style.

    It's colourful with lots of types of sharks in drawings. The information is 'bite-sized' because it is in windows of the comics. It is a little tricky to know where to read first as there is a

    This was an interesting book. It is a fact book about sharks in the style of a comic book- no photos all drawings. Personally as a teacher, I prefer the traditional fact-file style book as they are clear and useful when teaching children new genres. However, I can imagine certain children loving this style.

    It's colourful with lots of types of sharks in drawings. The information is 'bite-sized' because it is in windows of the comics. It is a little tricky to know where to read first as there is a lot on each page but I can imagine this will be a hit with ten year olds during silent reading. It's one you can dip in and out of again. Horrible science fans will probably enjoy this addition to their bookshelf

  • Ann

    Way better than I was expecting.

    super cute series - just the right balance of silly jokes and real science facts. Kids should really enjoy them and will actually learn something.

    Perfect for reading during commercials while watching Shark Week :)

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