Hermes: Tales of the Trickster

Hermes: Tales of the Trickster

The New York Times bestselling series continues as author/artist George O’Connor focuses on Hermes, the trickster god in Olympians: Hermes: Tales of the Trickster.In volume ten of Olympians, George O’Connor delves into the myth of Hermes, the trickster god. From his infancy, when he bewitches animals and bends them to his will (stealing a herd of Apollo’s prize cattle in t...

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Title:Hermes: Tales of the Trickster
Author:George O'Connor
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Hermes: Tales of the Trickster Reviews

  • Tom McDonald

    There are obviously several factors that make George O'Connor's Olympian series such a relish, among these the stellar design of each protagonist, the characterization, the narrative technique, its near universality in accessibility -- and all of these continue through this tenth entry, Hermes: Tales of the Trickster.

    To this point in the greater story, Hermes has been nearly everywhere yet absolutely nowher

    There are obviously several factors that make George O'Connor's Olympian series such a relish, among these the stellar design of each protagonist, the characterization, the narrative technique, its near universality in accessibility -- and all of these continue through this tenth entry, Hermes: Tales of the Trickster.

    To this point in the greater story, Hermes has been nearly everywhere yet absolutely nowhere. He's been the most prominent cursory character this entire time, dipping into each narrative with a now signature fast-talking, fast-paced style… as well as with a touch mystery. So when we see Hermes zipping through the night as an infant vandal, or executing a dizzying number of functions, the latter which O'Connor deftly illustrates, suddenly what we've glimpsed before begins to make some sense. We begin to get an understanding of just who this wise guy is, someone who's cleverly always in the mix of everything.

    O'Connor states that Hermes is his favorite, and his sheer enthusiasm for portraying the character is palpable. He's having as much fun telling this tale as Hermes himself appears to be in all his sly high jinks. Even though Typhon with his monstrous grandeur attempts to steal the story, Hermes is by far the capital thief here of our attention.

    O'Connor's faithfulness to the classical myths along with his intuitive insight into these gods is probably the most compelling element of his series, as well as his ability to structure things in a greater, overreaching arc. Seeing that Argos the giant is finally the conclusion to what started seven books ago, or more profoundly, realizing that Hermes shares deep parallels with his father Zeus that not even mythological scholars of today will highlight, to say nothing of the twist in the ending, all make for a more satisfying read than simply taking this story at face value, especially as we slowly come to the conclusion of the series.

    The mystery is uncovered -- we finally see Hermes' face...! And he's handsome, too! Just to fully see Hermes, isn't that enough to warrant reading?

  • Stuart

    The latest volume in O'Connor's super hero treatment of Greek mythology does an excellent job of embodying the subject matter as O'Connor turns his whimsical style towards gods who wear it well: Hermes and Pan. There's even a nice little twist in the narrative that, as the god himself notes, is "very Hermes" and shows a bit of narrative maturity and growth on O'Connor's part as a storyteller. In his afterward he confesses to having loved Hermes since 3rd grade, and even dressing up like him as p

    The latest volume in O'Connor's super hero treatment of Greek mythology does an excellent job of embodying the subject matter as O'Connor turns his whimsical style towards gods who wear it well: Hermes and Pan. There's even a nice little twist in the narrative that, as the god himself notes, is "very Hermes" and shows a bit of narrative maturity and growth on O'Connor's part as a storyteller. In his afterward he confesses to having loved Hermes since 3rd grade, and even dressing up like him as part of a school project (for the record, I dressed up as Hermes for Halloween in fifth grade so... clearly I also have an affinity for the god). As the series continues it's hard to see how he's going to wrap it up in the next two volumes but it also wouldn't surprise me if he ends up just moving past the Olympians and creating focus texts around secondary gods. Regardless, O'Connor's love for his material shines through and makes this latest installment a worthy entry.

  • Ian

    The 2018 addition to George O'Connor's comic series about Olympian gods educating young and old alike brings us the trickster and ever busy Hermes. Told from from a traveling man who does not seem surprised or worried when he meets Argus Panoptes the all-seeing giant. Although the original version of the tale was a bit more bloody with a little artistic licensing George was able to make this tale a little more kid friendly and even bring in a famous writer into the story.

    Also included in this vo

    The 2018 addition to George O'Connor's comic series about Olympian gods educating young and old alike brings us the trickster and ever busy Hermes. Told from from a traveling man who does not seem surprised or worried when he meets Argus Panoptes the all-seeing giant. Although the original version of the tale was a bit more bloody with a little artistic licensing George was able to make this tale a little more kid friendly and even bring in a famous writer into the story.

    Also included in this volume of the Olympians we get to see stories of 1 day old Hermes, Stories of Hermes' son Pan, a tale about hospitality gone dangerously right, and also an epic battle with the great fiend Typhon who intimidated all but the fiercest of Olympians.

    Be sure to stick around after the comics to check out the notes about figures in the book as well as the Geek notes which give us an insight into George's personal notes about certain pages of the book and less vital information about things showing up in the book. :)

    I for one couldn't help but laugh at the tales of young Hermes as Apollo was fooled and easily tempted by the young godling while Artemis remained the straight woman of what seemed to be a comedy act. :)

  • Erin

    Full review to be posted in January 2018.

  • Rummanah (Books in the Spotlight)

    Another enjoyable volume to the Olympians graphic novel series. Unlike the other volumes, the stories included in this graphic novel were all new to me. I love learning new stuff! Since I read the ARC of this, a lot of the text was squished together and had issue of spacing which made it hard to read. I hope the publishers do fix this in the actual print edition. The illustrations were a bit grainy too, but that might be due to the electronic format? Here's hoping. Like always, O'Connor provides

    Another enjoyable volume to the Olympians graphic novel series. Unlike the other volumes, the stories included in this graphic novel were all new to me. I love learning new stuff! Since I read the ARC of this, a lot of the text was squished together and had issue of spacing which made it hard to read. I hope the publishers do fix this in the actual print edition. The illustrations were a bit grainy too, but that might be due to the electronic format? Here's hoping. Like always, O'Connor provides a great list of further reading recommendations and an author's note. This is a fun series for those who are already caught up with Rick Riordan's books and can't get enough of mythology.

  • Bea  Charmed

    Aah, the joys of reading an ARC. Many of the words and sentences lack spacing between them so theyruntgetherlikethis. Ack. Well over the half the text was like that, making for challenging reading. I do hope that's corrected in the final copy as it seriously interfered with the reading. The artwork was meh, kind of blurry at times and lacking in detail. The story, now, that was a good one. I'm reasonably familiar with Greek mythology but a lot of the stories and details were new to me, and they

    Aah, the joys of reading an ARC. Many of the words and sentences lack spacing between them so theyruntgetherlikethis. Ack. Well over the half the text was like that, making for challenging reading. I do hope that's corrected in the final copy as it seriously interfered with the reading. The artwork was meh, kind of blurry at times and lacking in detail. The story, now, that was a good one. I'm reasonably familiar with Greek mythology but a lot of the stories and details were new to me, and they were woven into a cohesive storyline with an ending that I didn't see coming. At the end of the book were biographies of some of the key figures in the story, a bibliography, footnotes, and some discussion questions.

  • Kristy K

    I've only read one other graphic novel by O'Connor and that was Zeus. I wasn't a big fan but I love Greek mythology and it has been 8 or so graphic novels since then so I decided to give him another try. While I did enjoy the story of Hermes more, I still felt something is missing. The drawings don't grab me and the narrative is very straight forward almost to the point of being dull, which I feel mythology is anything but.

  • Ron

    George O'Connor continues his series on the Olympians with Hermes. Hermes is a trickster among his many attributes as becomes clear in stories told to Argus by Aesop that reveal his origins, his relationship with other Olympians, and major life events. The book also sets up future tales. In all a very nice addition to this series.

    I want to thank Netgalley and First Second Books for the chance to review this title.

  • Mrs. Kenyon

    Hermes is the god of peacemakers, astronomy, calendars, and writing. He is also the god of thieves and liars, language, and politicians. He has many other categories that he is the god of, but he is most known for being a trickster. Hermes: Tales of the Trickster is a graphic novel depicting many of his exploits. O’Connor continues his Olympians series with this tenth volume. The graphics and format are the same as the other books, but since each book is about a different Olympian, readers do no

    Hermes is the god of peacemakers, astronomy, calendars, and writing. He is also the god of thieves and liars, language, and politicians. He has many other categories that he is the god of, but he is most known for being a trickster. Hermes: Tales of the Trickster is a graphic novel depicting many of his exploits. O’Connor continues his Olympians series with this tenth volume. The graphics and format are the same as the other books, but since each book is about a different Olympian, readers do not need to read them in any particular order. These stories of Hermes are quickly devoured and will please most readers of mythology and/or graphic novels.

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