Go Home!

Go Home!

"Go home!" is always a slur, but often also an impossibility; this collection explores the words' personal and political dimensions.New, emerging, and established Asian diasporic writers touch on the personal and political dimensions of home in the 21st century. Both urgent and meditative, this literary anthology showcases fiction, memoir, and poetry from a diverse array o...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Go Home!
Author:Rowan Hisayo Buchanan
Rating:

Go Home! Reviews

  • Liana

    I was tempted to go 4 stars, but I loved certain stories so much, the anthology deserves the recognition. Enjoying this depends on how you connect with the narratives, how much you like modern poetry, how well you jive with the mix of fiction and non fiction and perspectives. This made me seek out other stories written by some of the authors, which is unusual. There is a poem written in devanagri (hindi maybe? I could read it but not understand the words because it wasn't Nepali) but the next po

    I was tempted to go 4 stars, but I loved certain stories so much, the anthology deserves the recognition. Enjoying this depends on how you connect with the narratives, how much you like modern poetry, how well you jive with the mix of fiction and non fiction and perspectives. This made me seek out other stories written by some of the authors, which is unusual. There is a poem written in devanagri (hindi maybe? I could read it but not understand the words because it wasn't Nepali) but the next poem is the same thing translated into English, I'm pretty sure.

  • Paris (Paperback Paris)

    ―Wo Chan, "what do i make of my face / except"

    Each eidetic view of home in this book ― be it the quest, the bounty or lack thereof ― is anchored with ebullition. The writers white-knuckling in GO HOME! are at first parted at relative crossroads, but eventually reunite ag

    ―Wo Chan, "what do i make of my face / except"

    Each eidetic view of home in this book ― be it the quest, the bounty or lack thereof ― is anchored with ebullition. The writers white-knuckling in GO HOME! are at first parted at relative crossroads, but eventually reunite again for the year's first incisive anthology.

    When I first blurbed this book at the beginning of the year, I knew it would be something sumptuous. I like trusting my gut feelings. Reading GO HOME! — the first anthology edited by Rowan Hisayo Buchanan — was, for lack of ampler words, an unbelievably overwhelming experience.

    Part domestic ritual, part uprising against cultural erasure, GO HOME! laughs in the face of the decorous and often too-white insignia of American acceptance. Unbeknownst to them, each writer's story is imbued with uncertainty, grace, and blood — but the humiliation of it all is purged by the final flick of the page.

    Alexander Chee's (too-close-to-home hitting) "Release"

    Sharlene Teo's "Sit Bones"

    Wo Chan's "what do i make of my face / except" ― this one crippled me.

    Rajiv Mohabir's "Costero," "Pygmy Right Whale," and (especially) "Kalapani"

    Esme Weijun Wang's (incredible) "Elegy"

    Karissa Chen's "Blue Tears"

    Jason Koo's "Bon Chul Koo and the Hall of Fame"

    Big thanks to Jisu at Feminist Press for allowing me to read ahead. I can't wait for everyone to read these stories, and to add a personal copy of GO HOME! on my mantel this March.

    (Full review to come @

    )

  • Georgia

    Some of these pieces I LOVED: Alexander Chee's Release, Alice Sola Kim's Mothers Lock Up Your Daughters, and Mia Alvar's Esmeralda. Some pieces felt less accessible to me, poetry being a perpetual obstacle (although Mohja Kahf and Jason Koo managed to write poems that spoke to me a little bit more). Honestly, there were two that I could not finish. But as a whole, I felt so blessed to be holding this powerful volume about stories about HOME from Asian diasporic voices, both established and emerg

    Some of these pieces I LOVED: Alexander Chee's Release, Alice Sola Kim's Mothers Lock Up Your Daughters, and Mia Alvar's Esmeralda. Some pieces felt less accessible to me, poetry being a perpetual obstacle (although Mohja Kahf and Jason Koo managed to write poems that spoke to me a little bit more). Honestly, there were two that I could not finish. But as a whole, I felt so blessed to be holding this powerful volume about stories about HOME from Asian diasporic voices, both established and emerging.

  • David Yoon

    Anthologies can be hit or miss and the overarching theme laid out is a bit of a stretch for some of the collected pieces. But certain selections really deliver. Alexander Chee makes it look easy and it was comforting to see Chang-Rae Lee again - he, my first introduction to a Korean writer in English. The heretofore unknown author Alice Sola Kim's "Mother's Lock Up Your Daughters Because They are Terrifying" was absolutely fantastic. I loved the rock and roll, Middle-East meets West poetry of Mo

    Anthologies can be hit or miss and the overarching theme laid out is a bit of a stretch for some of the collected pieces. But certain selections really deliver. Alexander Chee makes it look easy and it was comforting to see Chang-Rae Lee again - he, my first introduction to a Korean writer in English. The heretofore unknown author Alice Sola Kim's "Mother's Lock Up Your Daughters Because They are Terrifying" was absolutely fantastic. I loved the rock and roll, Middle-East meets West poetry of Mohja Kahf. Jason Koo's poem "Bon Chul Koo and the Hall of Fame" speaks to something very familiar.

    Sure some of the pieces were a bit inscrutable, not the least of which the poem written entirely in Arabic, but I appreciate the introduction to some new talent pulled from the Asian diaspora. This is the perfect roadmap to some great future reads.

  • Kaitlin

    The spring of 2013 was the first time I found myself on the east coast of the United States. A restless teenager from Hong Kong, I was intent on finding a place for myself outside what I considered, at the time, to be a small island. I clearly remember being in a rental car with my mother, windows down because we were eating in the car, when someone called out to me from the kerb, "go back to where you came from!" I had a copy of Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar in my lap.

    I have long awaited this ant

    The spring of 2013 was the first time I found myself on the east coast of the United States. A restless teenager from Hong Kong, I was intent on finding a place for myself outside what I considered, at the time, to be a small island. I clearly remember being in a rental car with my mother, windows down because we were eating in the car, when someone called out to me from the kerb, "go back to where you came from!" I had a copy of Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar in my lap.

    I have long awaited this anthology. It is ambitious in its scope, and collects a dynamic constellation of writers. I am impressed with how each text feels intentionally included, and how much of a whole this anthology is able to form (a rare feat.) The book's sequencing and pacing is commendable, given the varying styles and lengths of each text. Certain texts, including Chaya Babu's Cul-de-sac, Mia Alvar's Esmeralda, Alex Chee's Release and Chang-Rae Lee's The Faintest Echo of Our Language are particularly memorable for their masterful maneuvering between memories past and present hindsight. Lee's story in particular is so searing and delicate in its depiction of the author's ailing mother that I paused between every few pages to re-read and weep.

    This anthology makes me grateful to be alive today, living in the same moment as these writers and poets who so tirelessly work amidst what used to be, and sometimes still is, a reductive and racist literary world.

  • Lucy

    An anthology with a diverse collection of poetry, prose, and short stories. The works were not simply set in the U.S., but around the world. Although the book was a refreshing read that tackles intersectional identities and experience, some pieces definitely outshined the rest. Moreover, the overall theme, as established in the Foreword, is not always as present as it should be. (It may be best to read the anthology with a perspective broader than the established theme of "home" in order to bett

    An anthology with a diverse collection of poetry, prose, and short stories. The works were not simply set in the U.S., but around the world. Although the book was a refreshing read that tackles intersectional identities and experience, some pieces definitely outshined the rest. Moreover, the overall theme, as established in the Foreword, is not always as present as it should be. (It may be best to read the anthology with a perspective broader than the established theme of "home" in order to better enjoy each individual pieces.) Nonetheless, the collection in "Go Home!" deserves more recognition for its thought proving storytelling.

  • Lili Kim

    Chang-Rae Lee showcased my elementary Korean language best when he said:

    "To me [my mother] speaks in a child's Korean, and for her I speak that same child's English. We use only the simplest words. I think it strange that throughout this dire period we necessarily speak like this. Neither of us has ever grown up or out of this language. . . I love her, and I cannot grow up."

    Other notable quotes throughout this compilation of diverse voices:

    "Getting older has meant understanding that the limitati

    Chang-Rae Lee showcased my elementary Korean language best when he said:

    "To me [my mother] speaks in a child's Korean, and for her I speak that same child's English. We use only the simplest words. I think it strange that throughout this dire period we necessarily speak like this. Neither of us has ever grown up or out of this language. . . I love her, and I cannot grow up."

    Other notable quotes throughout this compilation of diverse voices:

    "Getting older has meant understanding that the limitations of my identity are abstract, and that faith is malleable, as is desire. Everything is complex."

    "The library was literally my second home and also the home of the books through which I found freedom and flight from a world that I found confining."

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Short works from Asian diaspora writers, about the experience of being Asian in places where they are not the majority, whether that is in the United States and the child of immigrant parents, to relocating back to home that doesn't feel like home. It's a bit uneven but I was delighted to come across it in Hoopla, happy to see names I recognized like Buchanan, Chang-Rae Lee, and Alexander Chee. I was also pleased to find some Muslim voices, since they are not always the first association with As

    Short works from Asian diaspora writers, about the experience of being Asian in places where they are not the majority, whether that is in the United States and the child of immigrant parents, to relocating back to home that doesn't feel like home. It's a bit uneven but I was delighted to come across it in Hoopla, happy to see names I recognized like Buchanan, Chang-Rae Lee, and Alexander Chee. I was also pleased to find some Muslim voices, since they are not always the first association with Asian writers that people tend to make. Probably a good palate cleanser, for people who are looking to read more diversely, and to read in between other things.

    (And I still haven't read Rowan Hisayo Buchanan's actual books, should I?)

  • Dominique

    This is a uniquely intimate anthology. Getting to explore what sentiments, food, imagery, people, places are evoked when these writers think of "home" was a treat.

    I especially loved reading these pieces:

    by Esmé W. Wang details the unfortunate development of her gluten allergy and how that affected her, after being raised on Taiwanese cooking. She shares her experience of traveling to Taiwan and it really moved me deeply.

    I loved Mohja Kahf's poem,

    This is a uniquely intimate anthology. Getting to explore what sentiments, food, imagery, people, places are evoked when these writers think of "home" was a treat.

    I especially loved reading these pieces:

    by Esmé W. Wang details the unfortunate development of her gluten allergy and how that affected her, after being raised on Taiwanese cooking. She shares her experience of traveling to Taiwan and it really moved me deeply.

    I loved Mohja Kahf's poem,

    ! As well as

    by Marilyn Chin, which is just so badass...

    Ugh,

    by Chang-Rae Lee...my goodness. Talk about our first home, our mothers. What a phenomenal ending to the anthology.

    by Fariha Róisín was absolutely superb. Her sister wanting to be home in her own skin, in the skin of her choosing...*chef's kiss.

    by Jennifer Tseng certifiably undid me.

    Really glad I could experience this anthology.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.