Girls Burn Brighter

Girls Burn Brighter

A searing, electrifying debut novel set in India and America, about a once-in-a-lifetime friendship between two girls who are driven apart but never stop trying to find one another again.When Poornima first meets Savitha, she feels something she thought she lost for good when her mother died: hope. Poornima's father hires Savitha to work one of their sari looms, and the tw...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Girls Burn Brighter
Author:Shobha Rao
Rating:

Girls Burn Brighter Reviews

  • Michelle

    This is not your typical friendship story. This is friendship thriving in circumstances that most of us could barely imagine. This book is not for everyone. Ms. Rao holds nothing back to make the harsh realities of the world of slavery and abuse that far too many women face in our world. (I dislike using the sanitized phrase of human trafficking. It's slavery.) If you have triggers, you may safely assume they are in here.

    This is also incredibly well written. Poetic, sensual, and compelling. Even

    This is not your typical friendship story. This is friendship thriving in circumstances that most of us could barely imagine. This book is not for everyone. Ms. Rao holds nothing back to make the harsh realities of the world of slavery and abuse that far too many women face in our world. (I dislike using the sanitized phrase of human trafficking. It's slavery.) If you have triggers, you may safely assume they are in here.

    This is also incredibly well written. Poetic, sensual, and compelling. Even as you draw back in horror from what these women are facing, you race to turn the page to find out what happens next because Ms. Rao has made their hope your hope.

    As uncomfortable as it is to read some of what happens in this book, remember that these things are real. Real women and children are experiencing these things. Some young men are also experiencing these things. Remember that you can help. Start here if you'd like to learn more about how to help:

  • Marilyn

    I received a free copy of Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao in a Goodreads give away in exchange for an honest review. In the book, Girls Burn Brighter, the reader is transported to India where two young, poor girls Poornima and Savitha cross paths and form a bond that is tested but becomes stronger as the years continued. They grew up in a culture where girls were looked down upon as inferior to men. Poornima lost her mother when she was quite young. She now existed to serve her father's demand

    I received a free copy of Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao in a Goodreads give away in exchange for an honest review. In the book, Girls Burn Brighter, the reader is transported to India where two young, poor girls Poornima and Savitha cross paths and form a bond that is tested but becomes stronger as the years continued. They grew up in a culture where girls were looked down upon as inferior to men. Poornima lost her mother when she was quite young. She now existed to serve her father's demands, take care of her siblings and wait until a suitable match was made for her and her father could marry her off in an arranged marriage and end his responsibility to her. This was the way..she never questioned it. Then Savitha began working for her father. Savitha saw life differently from Poornima. Savitha was an independent minded girl and decided she had choices. The two girls became the best of friends and truly loved one another. Then because of a horrific incident Savitha was forced to leave her family, village and trusted friend. She was left with no other choice but to run away. Shortly after, Poornima was married off. She also experienced unimaginable acts of cruelty and she also ran away to escape her arranged marriage. Poornima, determined to find Savitha traveled into India's underworld and eventually to Seattle.

    This was a very moving book. My heart broke for these two girls and all that they had to endure. I highly recommend this book.

  • AnisaAnne

    Girls burn brighter is a compelling tale of love, friendship, and self-exploration. But mostly survival. It is the heart-wrenching story of being a girl in India and the possibilities beyond a fate.

    Her name, Poornima is a constant reminder of what she is not. She is not a source of income, an economic burden to her family. She is not a boy. At sixteen, with the loss of her mother, Poornima is relegated to domestic servitude to care about her four other siblings and father. She is destined to be

    Girls burn brighter is a compelling tale of love, friendship, and self-exploration. But mostly survival. It is the heart-wrenching story of being a girl in India and the possibilities beyond a fate.

    Her name, Poornima is a constant reminder of what she is not. She is not a source of income, an economic burden to her family. She is not a boy. At sixteen, with the loss of her mother, Poornima is relegated to domestic servitude to care about her four other siblings and father. She is destined to be married off at sixteen. But she yearns always to find a more significant meaning of life, beyond her gender. That is when she meets her. "She'd never known a hand could do that; contain so much purpose."

    Savitha, named after the eclipse carries a persistent fierce light in her spirit. The lack of food in the pots has forced this teenager to find work for her family. He father is a drunk and begs at the temple for food and money. Savitha has sat at a loom before; she knows how to weave threads, and this is where the start of a bright friendship begins.

    Poornima and her father have two looms, a place where saris and income for family life take place. Since her mother's death, the loom sits bare, until one-day Savitha appears. There is something different about Savitha. Is it her conviction? Or her purpose?

    Two more different teenagers will forge an unbreakable bond, even when life casts them unthinkable sorrow.

    The setting is Indravalli, near Andhra Pradesh in India. Rao takes us on a journey of lush mountains graced with sacred temples. An experience rich in Hindu traditions such as burning lights on holy mountains, ceremonial garlands of marigolds, and sagely sadhus performing pujas. As these images are stunning, there is another side to India that is less romantic. Poverty, huts clung together by cow dung, landscaped by old scraps of food, hands tiring from begging, caste systems, and dark history of exploitation. Such poverty lines the vibrant greens of rice fields and mountains.

    Beautifully written novel. Analogies are eloquently described providing rich prose. Poornima and Savith are skillfully developed characters with their personalities unfolding with grace. Poornima's mother, a recent memory is so vividly, and you can feel her presence, her love, her embrace. And you can see also taste the pain and humiliation that only comes by being born female in a country that discards women with a simple push.

    Girls Burn Brighter book is my first reading experience with the author Shobha Rao. My travels to South India has undoubtedly played a role in my enjoyment of the story and setting, but it is not essential. I am excited to discover more of Rao's writing.

    Thank you, Flatiron Books for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  • Jenny Lee

    I won this via a giveaway on good reads, and I could not be happier!

    MY HEART!!

    I did not want to put this book down, I wanted to get to the end and I wanted everything to be okay. I have never read a book where I wanted a happy ending SO BADLY!!

    This book... this book!! It will drag you down into the darkest parts of the world and how it treats women, and it will remind you how important it is to have hope, and to have strength.

  • Amy Morgan

    Thank you Edelweiss for my review copy of this book.

    Girls Burn Brighter was a captivating tale of 2 friends who are cruelly ripped apart but continue to spend their lives attempting to be reunited.

    Poornima and Savitha are unlikely friends but found one another when they were both in need of something that they weren't even aware of. After an unspeakable act Savitha is driven from their village and Poornima is forced into an arranged marriage by her father the two girls find themselves in place

    Thank you Edelweiss for my review copy of this book.

    Girls Burn Brighter was a captivating tale of 2 friends who are cruelly ripped apart but continue to spend their lives attempting to be reunited.

    Poornima and Savitha are unlikely friends but found one another when they were both in need of something that they weren't even aware of. After an unspeakable act Savitha is driven from their village and Poornima is forced into an arranged marriage by her father the two girls find themselves in places where there is no love or happiness. They long for one another and the simple joys they shared being in each other's company. 

    Told from the alternating perspective of each girl this story is one that shows the value of true love and friendship and how it can drive us to do things we would never think possible.

    While facing horrors such as abuse and human trafficking these two brave girls continue to fight for themselves and each other never allowing those who try to extinguish their hope  that there is more waiting for them somewhere in this world.

    Beautifully told this is a story you can't put down! 

  • Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog:

    “But what about love?”

    “What is love, Poori?” Savitha said. “What is love if not a hunger?”

    When Poornima’s mother dies, her father hires a young girl named Savitha to work the sari loom her mother once toiled at. Though far more poverty-striken than Poori, her passion for life burns brighter than seems possible in such drudgery. Poornima is stunned by the conditions Savitha lives in, piles of trash near the huts, stray dogs sniffing around, cow d

    via my blog:

    “But what about love?”

    “What is love, Poori?” Savitha said. “What is love if not a hunger?”

    When Poornima’s mother dies, her father hires a young girl named Savitha to work the sari loom her mother once toiled at. Though far more poverty-striken than Poori, her passion for life burns brighter than seems possible in such drudgery. Poornima is stunned by the conditions Savitha lives in, piles of trash near the huts, stray dogs sniffing around, cow dung walls, discarded tin for roof, by comparison she and her father live in a palace. That despite these conditions Savitha has a loving bond with her father surprises her. Love isn’t enough, though, in this world that rages against girls and poverty robs families of any hope for the security of their daughter’s future. A deep bond forms between the girls, who become like beloved sisters more than friends. Savitha’s full of wisdom, never one to let her circumstances tarnish her soul until one ill-fated moment, while making a beautiful sari for her beloved friend’s upcoming arranged marriage, a cruel act destroys all hope and causes her to flee. Poornima is left behind, with no other choice than to be a good wife and daughter-in-law too learns what it means to be swallowed by others expectations and cruel demands. She finds out being female is a price to pay, a punishment, a curse. She has never forgotten her dear Savitha, and goes to great extremes to find her.

    Savitha’s life takes shocking turns, beyond anything her once sunny disposition would lead her to imagine. Too, the appalling transgressions against women the world over becomes a nightmare Savitha will know too well. In order to escape cruelty, young women find themselves cornered, deceived and trapped. America is the place to start over, but this isn’t the usual immigrant’s tale of hope and freedom. Poornima will do everything she can to find out what happened to Savitha, but will she be able to save herself in the process?

    While a tale of friendship, and strength in the face of adversity it also encompasses terrible cruelties. Much as Poornima was protected when her mother was alive and told to ‘look away’ from the very places Savitha comes from, she quickly learns the world harbors far more horrifying fates. It’s not an easy read so if you are looking for a tale of happy fate, this isn’t for you. It’s at turns humbling and heartbreaking. Wonderfully written, a lot for any book club to chew on.

    Publication Date: March 6, 2018

    Flatiron Books

  • Elizabeth S

    By some miracle, I won this book in a goodreads giveaway!

    Frankly, I was not totally clear on the premise of it by the time it arrived at my doorstep and I got around to finishing the books I had lined up to read beforehand. Too much time had passed, and too many other books had taken over my focus.

    But now that I've read

    , I'm even more delighted I won the giveaway than I was when I received the email. Rao's story isn't just an entertaining one in which to lose yourself for a w

    By some miracle, I won this book in a goodreads giveaway!

    Frankly, I was not totally clear on the premise of it by the time it arrived at my doorstep and I got around to finishing the books I had lined up to read beforehand. Too much time had passed, and too many other books had taken over my focus.

    But now that I've read

    , I'm even more delighted I won the giveaway than I was when I received the email. Rao's story isn't just an entertaining one in which to lose yourself for a while. Instead, it's something much grander, which takes you on a journey while keeping its narration grounded enough to make sure some part of it always feels

    I'm pretty sure I skimmed the blurb three times without properly soaking in what this book was meant to depict. All I really got was that there were two girls, they were separated by an incident, and then they worked to find each other over time.

    On the base level, that's exactly what this book is. Yet at the same time,

    is a tale of self-exploration, understanding, love, friendship, and journeys with unexpected destinations. I connected to it in a way I didn't anticipate, and for that, even when I felt as though I was still only on the surface, I was still drawn in beyond a way I could explain with words.

    The two protagonists didn't look like I do, act like I do, or speak like I do. We have seemingly no shared experiences and they have encountered horrors I can only imagine. But the beauty of Poornima and Savitha is that their personalities are so rich, there seems to always be

    to which you connect without realizing you've done so.

    Simplicity drives the story when you take some time to inspect it. A lot happens, yet the focus of the narrative never wavers; Poornima and Savitha are not always by each other's sides or actively on each other's minds, but they're always with one another somehow. The depth of their bond seeps through the pages and winds its way around their every move. Whether they state as much explicitly or not, it's laid bare for the reader to see when a second glance is given at each scene.

    One of the reasons this story worked better for me than I had anticipated was because it was

    just a tale about two girls who were separated and went in search of one another. That focus on rediscovering a long-lost friend or family member by going on some grand adventure has been rising in popularity, and thus, in my mind, it's getting rather tired.

    chooses to focus more on the small steps that make up the greater journey.

    We see the mundane daily tasks, the frequent obstacles, the pain, the suffering, and the moments of peace. Most of all, we see the light inside both girls that grows rather than dims, carrying them through every page.

    As someone who likes books that move forward, but who also greatly enjoys how quiet moments can propel stories often better than dramatic change and crazy twists can, I thought Rao executed every part of this very well.

    Normally, I rate a book before I write a review. I come out from reading it with a conviction of how many stars I want to grant the book, and then I sort through my thoughts and write them down as an explanation. Only while writing this sentence have I finally decided how to rate

    Its style and story don't necessarily jump out as things I would choose on first glance, so part of me worried and wondered if I should put it at about a 3, maybe mentioning it really deserved 3.5 stars. But the thing is, I didn't just

    this book. I

    liked it.

    didn't make me laugh or cry as some books certainly manage, yet it did seem to take my stomach and twist it, just before reaching up to my heart and starting to do the same. The way this book affected me was just like the plot - not dramatic, sudden, or overdone, but instead haunting, thoughtful, and thorough.

    In the end, 3.5 stars can't be enough, especially not rounded down. After all, what I realized was that I needed time to let my feelings fully wash over me and permeate my mind to settle on where this book left me. Even now, some of the images keep creeping back into my thought and leaving me unsettled, which marks me as an indication of good writing.

    The lights burning and growing within Poornima and Savitha continue to catch me off guard and give me a sense of hope. For what exactly, I don't know. Most likely for their bond and the possibility it can be found one way or another in all of our lives.

    Now all I can do is say that I definitely recommend you check out this book when it's released in March. In the meantime, I still need to soak in all of my sentiments upon finishing it, because

    has an uncanny ability to leave me feeling revealed to the world, despite not obviously provoking such a reaction.

  • Jessica Woodbury

    This book is about a deep and defining connection between two women. At first I wanted to call it romantic love, but as I did a little googling to figure out if that was really what I was looking for, I came upon the four different types of "love" according to ancient Greeks and realized that what I wanted was actually 3 of them: Eros (romantic), Agape (familial), and Philia (friendship). The relationship between Poornima, named for the moon, and Savitha, named for the sun, is a combination of a

    This book is about a deep and defining connection between two women. At first I wanted to call it romantic love, but as I did a little googling to figure out if that was really what I was looking for, I came upon the four different types of "love" according to ancient Greeks and realized that what I wanted was actually 3 of them: Eros (romantic), Agape (familial), and Philia (friendship). The relationship between Poornima, named for the moon, and Savitha, named for the sun, is a combination of all of these. They are, simply, everything to one another. The reason for existence. Friends, chosen family, and yet there is something even deeper than that, too, a connection that makes them each other's soulmate.

    Usually when I read a book where someone falls passionately in love and spends the rest of their life obsessed with this person, even when they are not together, I have a hard time buying in to it. And for GIRLS BURN BRIGHTER it is absolutely necessary that you accept the central relationship as one that cannot be extinguished. It is easier to do here than in some of those other books because the world Poornima and Savitha live in is such a difficult one, because their only love and solace is in each other. Somehow Rao made this easy for me to do, even though it is usually a difficult concept for me, here I could see that this was something I had to accept the way I accept magic in a Fantasy novel, and I was happy to do it.

    While love is the overriding theme and center of the book, its plot and its purpose, I should warn you that there is even more that is harrowing and brutal. This is not a book to be entered into lightly. Traumas abound, they are everywhere you look, and just when you think you've left one you find yourself in one that is even worse. As readers we cling to Poornima and Savitha's connection because it is literally the only thing we have to cling to as we watch unspeakable horrors visited upon them. Brace yourself. A few additional thoughts/quibbles on that behind spoiler tags:

    This is a book that follows a set of clear tropes, but it does it in a skillful way. Relying on worn tropes can turn me off entirely, but here it's so clear that Rao knows these tropes, that she uses them to guide you as a reader, to help you navigate through the story. It is necessary, since the difficulties these women face may be too much to manage otherwise. For the last third of the book I happily surrendered to where it was going and cared not one whit about the fact that I was pretty sure I knew our final destination.

    A very strong debut, a sure voice, and an unforgettable story.

  • Shannon

    I've been waiting for this new release since reading An Unrestored Woman. There was an obvious thoughtfulness in the way Shobha handled the issues that befell many of her characters in An Unrestored Woman - issues that were present for no other reason than because they are women. The challenges the women faced were authentic and the ways they handle them were varied. So when I realized she was writing about resilient women yet again, I was filled with expectations.

    The opening of this story suck

    I've been waiting for this new release since reading An Unrestored Woman. There was an obvious thoughtfulness in the way Shobha handled the issues that befell many of her characters in An Unrestored Woman - issues that were present for no other reason than because they are women. The challenges the women faced were authentic and the ways they handle them were varied. So when I realized she was writing about resilient women yet again, I was filled with expectations.

    The opening of this story sucked me right in. Pretty is the word that kept coming to mind as I was thinking of a way to describe the writing. What the girls go through in Girls Burn Brighter is brutal and, at times, nothing short of horrifying. But as I anticipated, Shobha handles their trials with a thoughtfulness that makes you wish you could reach into the story and save the characters yourself.

    The expected complicity from men in cultures that allow women and girls to be devalued is present in this novel. However, the irony is that once some girls become women they have the same expectations of the girls that come behind them. This novel presents an interesting juxtaposition by placing a family that values its daughter beside a family that follows the tradition of valuing girls less. But sadly, it is difficult to overcome the fact that girls are girls under this cultural paradigm. Girls Burn Brighter gives us two girls that ignore everything I just wrote in this paragraph. And that's what makes this book special.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.