Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures

Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures

Actress, director, entertainer Joely Fisher invites readers backstage, into the intimate world of her career and family with this touching, down-to-earth memoir filled with incredible, candid stories about her life, her famous parents, and how the loss of her unlikely hero, sister Carrie Fisher, ignited the writer in her.Growing up in an iconic Hollywood Dynasty, Joely Fis...

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Title:Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures
Author:Joely Fisher
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Edition Language:English

Growing Up Fisher: Musings, Memories, and Misadventures Reviews

  • Christina

    I adored this book! I read it simultaneously in audio and print, so that after every chapter I listened to I could go look at the fantastic full color photos in the hardcover copy to put faces to the names she talked about. I've been a fan of Joely's for years, as well as the rest of her famous family, so this was chock full of interesting family lore that I didn't know. She wrote it shortly after her half sister Carrie Fisher died, so some of it has a bittersweet tinge, as she talks about their

    I adored this book! I read it simultaneously in audio and print, so that after every chapter I listened to I could go look at the fantastic full color photos in the hardcover copy to put faces to the names she talked about. I've been a fan of Joely's for years, as well as the rest of her famous family, so this was chock full of interesting family lore that I didn't know. She wrote it shortly after her half sister Carrie Fisher died, so some of it has a bittersweet tinge, as she talks about their relationship and about how hard it was when Carrie passed away. She also deals with her mother Connie Stevens' stroke in 2016, and the loss of her father Eddie Fisher, with whom she had a complicated relationship, being an absent father for her while she was growing up, but with whom she reconnected when she went off to college in Boston and could visit him in New York City. This is a funny book, full of sweet stories and anecdotes, told in Joely's inimitable dry style, but also a very personal book, as she discusses her drug and alcohol use, her bisexuality (did not know that!), and her family's many foibles and tragedies. She devotes a full chapter each to the life story of Eddie and of Connie, which was cool; I enjoyed learning more about their lives. She also talks about her own marriage and being a mom of two biological daughters, an adopted daughter, and stepmom to two boys. It's a heartwarming book, a nice way to get to know a little more about one of my favorite actresses. I was also listening to this as I drove for long stretches of time to visit my mom in a nursing home as she recovered from an injury, and on the one hand that made the book really connect with me, especially all the daughter-of-an-aging parent stuff (Joely and I are only a year apart in age), but on the other hand gave it extra poignancy and made me cry quite a bit more than I probably would have had I read it at any other time! It was also awesome to have her narrate her own book; being an actress, she does it particularly well, and it was like having a conversation with a friend, one who also makes you cry from laughter!

  • Kayo

    Very interesting.

  • Kirk

    Fasinating. Somewhat disjointed, jumps back and forth in time, otherwise a fasinating look inside a world few of us will ever know.

  • Dawn Kaestner

    I have always liked Joely's work and this was a decent autobiography however, I almost wish I hadn't read it. I thought she came across as a whiny, narcissistic, over-spender whose goal is to live off the connection to her more famous relatives. The "poor me" vibe was annoying at best.

  • Mediaman

    Joely Fisher is not normal. But she claims to be. She's a drug addict who defends her continued use and an upbringing where drugs were just sitting out for the taking. She's an alcoholic who claims to have her drinking under control though she won't give it up. She's sexually fluid, saying the greatest love of her life was a women that she wishes she was with today yet she married a man with whom she admits to having threesomes and open relationships. Then throughout the book she tells the reade

    Joely Fisher is not normal. But she claims to be. She's a drug addict who defends her continued use and an upbringing where drugs were just sitting out for the taking. She's an alcoholic who claims to have her drinking under control though she won't give it up. She's sexually fluid, saying the greatest love of her life was a women that she wishes she was with today yet she married a man with whom she admits to having threesomes and open relationships. Then throughout the book she tells the reader how "normal" she is and that what she does is what anyone would do. Oh no it's not.

    Being the child of long-ago singer Eddie Fisher and B-list celebrity Connie Stevens is exaggerated by Joely into being that she was the child of one of the most famous couples in history. She goes way overboard hyping her mother as being a top celebrity when in truth Connie was a very cute 60s sidekick who few under the ago of 60 would recognize today. She demeans her dad because he only saw her four or five times in her childhood, forgot her birthday, mooched off his kids when they started making money, and even managed to misspell her sister's name in his autobiography. Yet Joely ties herself to these people and claims herself to be a "star," but she had a minor long-ago career and has a hard time getting work today.

    The problem is that she was the half-sister of Carrie Fisher and the book is filled with her obvious insecurity of being in Princess Leia's shadow. She works overtime trying to convince us that the two were serious sisters cut from the same cloth (and that's good?). Debbie Reynolds was her ex-stepmom and ended up living next door, so Joely feels the need to make her own mother to be on an equal level of stardom with Debbie. But reality is that Debbie and Carrie were major Hollywood actresses, while Connie and Joely were minor performers that were trying to get a lot of mileage out of their last name. The title of the book is appropriate, because she wants to be known as a Fisher to tie herself to the more famous members of her family.

    The book itself has a lot of interesting stories but you have to wade through a disorganized mess in order to get to them. The first few chapters of the book skip and hop around to different subjects and eras. It almost made me put it down because she seemed to be hyped up on something (the drugs she loves to brag about taking?). By the middle of the book she is better organized, though begging for the reader to love her and accept her flaws. There are repetitive stories and places of contradiction--she claims to not be Jewish in one spot but her father's parents were Jewish and later she describes herself as having "Jewish Italian curls." The last portion of the book reveals her terrible shopping habits, which she blames on her mom and her genes, as well as major financial issues, which she wants to blame on a money manager that doesn't file her taxes. But she needs to ask herself why she wasn't paying attention to her money for seven years, and wasted tens of thousands of dollars on drugs and drinking, then wants us to feel sorry for her having to sell her mom's seven houses before moving into a rental.

    Her lack of self-awareness runs throughout the book. She constantly talks about how "inclusive" she is and how "inclusive" she teaches her children to be by accepting everyone--yet she uses the book to slam Trump, Republicans, and conservatives, telling her kids to stay away from them. So much for being inclusive. Her definition, which seems to match most of liberal Hollywood, is that inclusiveness means accepting drug addicts, alcoholics, sexual deviants, and those that want to use average taxpayers to pay for others failures and bad moral choices. If she truly were inclusive she would get her kids out of her Los Angeles area bubble and see how the rest of the world lives. Her problems are almost all of her own making and hard to empathize with. And while her charity work is admirable, it again is mostly L.A.-centric safe issues that will help her get jobs in the industry.

    There's nothing normal about her life, and while it can make for a sometimes entertaining life story it makes for frustrating reading when it reveals how out-of-touch celebrities are with the real world.

  • Robin

    Way too scattered for me. There was no rhyme or reason to the progression of chapters/section/musings and I ended up reading bits and pieces. And I'm really sorry as I've been looking forward to this since I heard about it last summer. Guess I prefer my memoirs to a little more linear.

  • Fifi

    The book was an ode to Carrie, but it told me nothing new. I was surprised at how Connie Stevens was portrayed. You know she loved her but....

  • Nicole

    I feel like this book was written for a variety of reasons and the style of this is not something to celebrate. As a fan of other Fisher writers, I was disappointed.

  • Jeanette

    No rating. The Introduction nearly did me in, but then the first parts of the book proper didn't seem quite as stupefying so I continued for awhile. Eddie Fisher's mentality has always rather fascinated me. I don't know why, really. Except for the fact, maybe but not only, that he could have thought that Liz would be a permanent thing in any measure of redefining permanent. So I wanted to read about his daughter. Connie Stevens was interesting too. Why did she settle?

    Regardless, this book in wri

    No rating. The Introduction nearly did me in, but then the first parts of the book proper didn't seem quite as stupefying so I continued for awhile. Eddie Fisher's mentality has always rather fascinated me. I don't know why, really. Except for the fact, maybe but not only, that he could have thought that Liz would be a permanent thing in any measure of redefining permanent. So I wanted to read about his daughter. Connie Stevens was interesting too. Why did she settle?

    Regardless, this book in writing style and language use and cognition, all three! I couldn't take any more after less than 100 pages. Don't bother. She certainly can't write despite being as screwed up as Carrie admitted she was. But Carrie could express it clearly without being a twit in doing so.

    Forgive me. I don't know why I bothered to pick this one up on impulse. My fault, I should have read the intro and at least a part of the middle before checking it out.

    DNF- dropped way before the 1/2.

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