Someone to Love

Someone to Love

Constantly in the spotlight thanks to her politician father's rising star, Olivia Blakely feels the pressure to be perfect. As the youngest girl in her class, she tries hard to keep up and to seem mature to the older boy she's crushing on, even as she catches his eye. But the need to look good on camera and at school soon grows into an all-consuming struggle with bulimia....

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Title:Someone to Love
Author:Melissa de la Cruz
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Someone to Love Reviews

  • Alaina Meserole

    I absolutely love Melissa de la Cruz and her writing. So when I saw this book was new this year (and month) AND it was available at my library.. well you don't have to tell me twice. I clicked the "reserve" button way too quickly.

    's cover is freaking beautiful that I just wanted to kiss the book when I picked it up. I didn't actually do that because I probably would've freaked out the librarians who were watching me..

    Now this book is about Olivia, aka Liv, who is the daughter of

    I absolutely love Melissa de la Cruz and her writing. So when I saw this book was new this year (and month) AND it was available at my library.. well you don't have to tell me twice. I clicked the "reserve" button way too quickly.

    's cover is freaking beautiful that I just wanted to kiss the book when I picked it up. I didn't actually do that because I probably would've freaked out the librarians who were watching me..

    Now this book is about Olivia, aka Liv, who is the daughter of a Politician. However, she is not only that but she is just a teenager dealing with bulimia. Liv is dealing with a very common problem because most teens are dealing with bulimia, anorexia, etc. I like that she was dealing with something so realistic that teens who are/aren't dealing with the same situation can still relate to her. It doesn't have to be them going through what she is - no, it could be someone they know or just go to school with.

    Overall, I really liked Liv. I think it probably has to deal with the fact that when I was younger someone said something to me about my weight and I sort of stopped eating for two weeks. Once my sister found out she told my dad and I was sort of put on watch - where they would sit me down for every meal and watch me eat everything on my plate. Looking back it wasn't the smartest idea to just stop eating but it was like I had blinders on. After a day or two, I didn't even realize I wasn't eating anything. Of course now that never happens - I love food way too much to just stop eating.

    I completely related to Liv throughout the entire book and I was so happy that I finally got to read it. I loved everything about it and I'm kind of sad that it's over. I can't wait to read the next book written by Melissa.

  • Nancy The book junkie

    Rating: 3.5/5

    Review to come!

  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)

    Someone to Love by Melissa de la Cruz is a YA novel that digs deep into the issues surrounding bulimia. While there is some enlightening information contained in this book that will educate its readers about a serious and often ignored topic, there are too many other topics that this book also attempts to address, which seems to detract from the original theme. The main character is one that can be empathized with, but she is not one that I found to be particularly enjoyable. This book contains

    Someone to Love by Melissa de la Cruz is a YA novel that digs deep into the issues surrounding bulimia. While there is some enlightening information contained in this book that will educate its readers about a serious and often ignored topic, there are too many other topics that this book also attempts to address, which seems to detract from the original theme. The main character is one that can be empathized with, but she is not one that I found to be particularly enjoyable. This book contains scenes of self-harm, so I will caution anyone who is triggered by this topic.

    When I first came across this book, I was really intrigued by the fact that it address an eating disorder. This seems to be a topic that has gone by the wayside in YA to make room for other relevant issues of our times. It is a theme that, unfortunately, will always be important to learn about, as it affects so many individuals in our society. While I am not versed on all of the details and signs of bulimia, Melissa de la Cruz absolutely offers her readers lots of insight in recognizing someone who may be suffering from this disorder, and the inner and outer struggles they face. I found this aspect of Someone to Love to be very educational.

    As I was reading this book, it felt like there were too many other issues attempting to be addressed at the same time as the main theme of bulimia. The other topics seemed to make appearances, yet there was no resolution or any sort of deeper understanding brought into the story. Some examples of these other topics are immigration, slut-shaming, alcoholism, and coming out. I feel as though the novel would have progressed a lot smoother and felt less jumbled if it had stuck to the main issue at hand. Yes, these other topics are important, however they just seemed thrown into the story and were not really resolved or dealt with at all.

    Olivia is a character who is absolutely under a great deal of pressure. This aspect of her personality is one that the reader can understand and even empathize with. However, the whiny nature of this character just becomes a bit too much. Creating a character, such as Olivia, is difficult for sure, as there have to be some qualities that the reader doesn’t like or approve of. I have had experience reading other books that have a main character who is dislikable, however as the story unfolds, it becomes apparent that the character has some redeeming qualities and as the issues are worked out, the character becomes one that is admirable. I did not find myself feeling this way about Olivia at all.

    Someone to Love is a book that addresses an issue that is not seen very often in YA and de la Cruz has provided her readers with a great wealth of information on the issues surrounding bulimia. It would have been more enjoyable to read this book if it had stuck to its main purpose and not go off in tangents to add in other hot topics. There may have been more opportunities to give the character of Olivia some redemption for the reader as well.

  • Sarah

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.

    I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along.

    The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm,

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HQ and NetGalley.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a politician’s daughter with bulimia.

    I felt quite sorry for Liv in this as she seemed to have so much going on, and seemed to be completely self-destructing as the book went along.

    The storyline in this was about Liv’s life struggling with her eating disorder, and trying to live up to her parent’s expectations of her. She struggled with her bulimia, she struggled with self-harm, and she struggled with her relationships with her family, friends, and love interest. I did think that the author did a good job of representing someone with an eating disorder, but I also found it quite difficult to get into the story.

    The ending to this was okay, and I was pleased that Liv was finally getting some help.

    ★★★★★★☆☆☆☆

    6 out of 10

  • Erin

    Trigger Warning for scenes involving self-harm, underage drinking, and the topic of eating disorders, specifically bulimia.

    My previous experience with Melissa De la Cruz was reading "The Witches of East End" and this book is certainly not dealing in magic. Rather, Cruz's character, Liv is a high school student with a talent for art, but a very low self esteem. Her parents are distracted by her father's political race for

    Trigger Warning for scenes involving self-harm, underage drinking, and the topic of eating disorders, specifically bulimia.

    My previous experience with Melissa De la Cruz was reading "The Witches of East End" and this book is certainly not dealing in magic. Rather, Cruz's character, Liv is a high school student with a talent for art, but a very low self esteem. Her parents are distracted by her father's political race for governor and her older brothers have their own adult worries. Neither they nor her best friends, Sam and Antonia notice Liv's descent into an eating disorder. Determined to make it with the "in crowd" and snag one of the hot teen actors that attends her school, Liv will do anything to finally be pretty.

    I noticed at the end of her book, Cruz dedicates the story to those who she knows that have suffered from this disorder. Although as a reader, it was sometimes hard to connect with Liv and in the beginning of the story, I just felt she was so very shallow. But then I came to understand that because of her self perception, Liv truly was unable to stop herself from continuing to purge her body. On the other hand, I felt the end was rather rushed to resolution and while there were glimmers of emotion from Liv's family members, I find it hard to believe that a young woman would only spend a few days in hospital after battling bulimia for almost two years. Mind you, I do love the last sentence of the story about how Liv needs to love herself before dating again .

  • Resch Reads

    *Book Received in Exchange for Honest Opinion/Review*

    I wanted to fall madly in love with this book...but alas I couldn't. I have been reading Melissa de la Cruz since she published her Blue Blood Series, way back in the day. So I thought this book would be a slam dunk but the topic of an eating disorder is dangerous water to tread in. The reason is, as someone who once struggled with one, I find authors have a hard time accurately portraying the internal struggles and it usually ends quickly wit

    *Book Received in Exchange for Honest Opinion/Review*

    I wanted to fall madly in love with this book...but alas I couldn't. I have been reading Melissa de la Cruz since she published her Blue Blood Series, way back in the day. So I thought this book would be a slam dunk but the topic of an eating disorder is dangerous water to tread in. The reason is, as someone who once struggled with one, I find authors have a hard time accurately portraying the internal struggles and it usually ends quickly with things wrapped up in a nice little bow.

    That same thing happened here, Liv is struggling with her bulimia and the story constantly discusses how she counts calories, but then she frequently drinks to take the edge off her hunger. In my disorder and recovery, we count those as empty calories, alcohol isn't calorie free. Liv just didn't go there for me as a character, while she seemed to go through the motions and struggles in her eating disorder, she isn't there emotionally. I wanted to be in her mind and feel the melt down, the disappoint, and the guilt but she never reaches that emotional level where we connected.

    I feel that this might largely be in part to the fact that if you have never had an eating disorder, you simply don't understand it. But also the fact that there were so many micro-stories and characters in the plot line that it over shadowed Liv's story. Liv is in high school in all AP classes but she hardly ever does homework. Liv is struggling to get to her goal weight, but I don't even know how tall she is until the end of the story...honestly, how can I know if a weight is extreme or not, 100 pounds on someone who is 5' tall versus 6' tall is very different.

    Its the little things like this that leave me feeling disconnected. While the story wasn't bad, it was simply meh. The ending was way too quick, I wanted to hear her therapy session, I wanted to see her eating, and there was not a single mention of purging after people find out about her bulimia. This was extremely disappointing, Melissa could have been the movement to normalize these sorts of things but she glides over them. In the end, I finished the read but its not something I will ever pick up again...and I can't say I would recommend it either.

  • Kate (beautifulbookland)

    First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.

    Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just

    . I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really eas

    First of all, I just want to put a trigger warning on this book for anyone who suffers with an eating disorder or self harms. You might want to proceed with caution.

    Books about eating disorders are sort of like when you see a really disturbing image on the telly, and you don't want to look but you just

    . I've suffered from anorexia for around 5 years now, and spent 2 of those years in a psychiatric hospital, and while I'm better and eating now, I still get triggered really easily. So reading this book? Not my greatest idea.

    I just want to start off by saying that I think Melissa de la Cruz meant well. I think she tried her hardest to write a book about eating disorders (which are incredibly difficult to write about, by the way. Even I struggle to explain what it's like living with it on a daily basis), but it just...I don't think it worked, and I think I've come to the conclusion that books like this that detail the lives of eating disorder sufferers are dangerous in the wrong hands.

    I don't want to talk about me and my experiences a load (this is a book review, not a Kate review), but I just want to explain where I'm coming from. When I was at my worst, at the beginning of my hospital admission, I would do

    to get rid of a few calories. I hid food in every single place possible and constantly had food crumbs in my bra. I was always looking for new ways to lose weight, whether that be from the pro-ana websites, or from books like Wintergirls, which is possibly the most dangerous and triggering ED book ever written. So the detail in which Melissa goes into when describing how Olivia purges...it's not good. And it's something that vulnerable, anorexia-consumed Kate would have

    up.

    The above comment is also relevant to recent films like To The Bone. It's dangerous. Yes, awareness needs to be spread. But I think the better way to spread awareness is in the form of memoirs or autobiographies, from people who know what it's like and can offer wisdom and encouragement for coming through the other side; people whose job is to inform, and not just entertain people for a few hours in the form of a YA book.

    Another thing I didn't like about Someone to Love was how Olivia's bulimia was brushed off by nearly everyone. Nobody seemed to take it seriously. Olivia's mother knew that she had an eating disorder, but what did she do? Nothing. She let her daughter spiral out of control, not even

    to her daughter about it. When Olivia's dad finds out about her ED, he asks her mother if she knew what was going on and she said:

    "Yes, it's very common among teenage girls."

    ...

    ...

    I'm going to shout it so the people at the back can hear; EATING DISORDERS ARE NOT TEENAGE GIRL PHASES. They do not discriminate, they are SERIOUS, and should NOT be ignored and allowed to sort themselves out. They are fucking terrifying, and isolating, and they aren't taken seriously enough.

    There's one other thing that I want to bring to attention: when Olivia is getting help at the end of the book, her doctor confides to Olivia she herself used to cut herself. And you know what she said?She said that she was a much "more violent cutter" than Olivia.

    You what?

    HOW

    FUCKING

    TRIGGERING

    WOULD

    THAT

    BE

    ?!?!

    That is basically saying that Olivia's problem isn't as serious as hers was. Self harm can easily be turned into a competition, and you can also easily convince yourself that you don't have a self harm problem by telling yourself that others do it more severely than you. I know. Believe me.

    Deep breath, Kate. Deep breath.

    So, the writing? The characters? Yeah, they were decent. Olivia irritated me a lot in the end, but I could also relate to her a lot when she was comparing herself to other girls. That is something that was realistic; Olivia's fascination with other girls, and her struggle to not dislike them because they were skinnier than her. That is something that ED patients struggle with a lot; when I was first admitted to the ED ward, I was in a wheelchair, and nobody spoke to me because I was the skinniest person there. And that's not me or my illness blowing my own trumpet, that's literally what I was told by the other patients, and the nurses. Don't get me wrong, those girls are lovely and I still speak with them. But eating disorders are nasty, manipulative things.

    The other characters (minus Sam) really irritated me at one point or another, but not enough that I need to start another essay about them.

    I'm going to wrap this review up because it's ridiculously long, but I needed to vent. I appreciate Melissa taking on a really difficult subject, but there were a lot of things that just didn't ring true for me. I obviously don't speak for everyone; there will probably be some ED recovered patients who like this book. I personally, though, didn't.

    *I received an e-arc via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

  • PinkAmy loves  💕 books📖, cats😻 and naps🛏

    GRADE: D

    1.5 STARS

    High school junior Olivia wilts under the pressure of her family’s high expectations and her father’s gubernatorial campaign. Bulimic, a heavy drinker and a cutter, finally dating her crush Zach isn’t the dream she had imagined. Liv is on the outs with her best friends and spiraling out of control.

    I very much enjoyed Melissa de la Cruz’s SOMETHING IN BETWEEN, but struggled through SOMEONE TO LOVE. The premise of a politician’s daughter striving for perfection sounded intriguin

    GRADE: D

    1.5 STARS

    High school junior Olivia wilts under the pressure of her family’s high expectations and her father’s gubernatorial campaign. Bulimic, a heavy drinker and a cutter, finally dating her crush Zach isn’t the dream she had imagined. Liv is on the outs with her best friends and spiraling out of control.

    I very much enjoyed Melissa de la Cruz’s SOMETHING IN BETWEEN, but struggled through SOMEONE TO LOVE. The premise of a politician’s daughter striving for perfection sounded intriguing, I was surprised at de la Cruz’s boring plot execution. Olivia wasn’t particularly likable. A social climber treated her real friends poorly while trying to achieve her relationship goals. Although Liv was hurting, I was well into the second half of the book before I felt much sympathy for her.

    The characters were one dimensional and the plot predictable. The best part of SOMEONE TO LOVE was that Olivia finally embraced recovery, although her linear recovery with perfect support from her previously unsupportive family was unrealistic for most sufferers of Liv’s problems.

  • Nasty Lady MJ

    To see review with gifs click

    Note, originally I two starred this, but upon reflection I can't justify the extra star. This book is just too much.

    Warning, this book is trigger inducing if you suffer from body dysmorphia, have an eating disorder, experienced sexual assault, and have committed self harm you might want to avoid this book. Because the book goes into in great detail, and God knows I could see it as trigger inducing. Even though I haven’t personally suffered from any of these th

    To see review with gifs click

    Note, originally I two starred this, but upon reflection I can't justify the extra star. This book is just too much.

    Warning, this book is trigger inducing if you suffer from body dysmorphia, have an eating disorder, experienced sexual assault, and have committed self harm you might want to avoid this book. Because the book goes into in great detail, and God knows I could see it as trigger inducing. Even though I haven’t personally suffered from any of these things, this book made me uncomfortable. True, it did not make me as uncomfortable as I was a 15 Year Old Blimp (which pretty much gave you even more detailed instructions than this book on how to binge and purge-yeah, I remember reading that as a 12 year old and being marginally freaked out) but it’s still bad.

    Going into this, I was more than a little weary. My more recent track record with de la Cruz’s books hasn’t been pleasant (to the point where I think my fondness for Bluebloods is merely driven by Nostalgia goggles) and honestly I was sort of relieved this one wasn’t worse than I expected (then again, you can’t get much lower than that sad Pride and Prejudice retelling).

    However, just not being that God awful, didn’t make me love this book by any means. In fact, it’s all kinds of awful. But it’s readable since it’s not name dropping some fashion designer every other pages. Because really Pride and Prejudice and Mistletoe really topped it with all of the Kate Spade pajamas the MC wore.

    I’ll start out with my biggest grievances with this book the multiple sexual assaults that the MC experiences. Several people make unwanted advances to Liv throughout the book, and she is slut slammed for it (one of those shamers being her asshole Paul Ryan Wannabe father, no less). Even after the overdramatic climax– of this book the being assaulted is never really addressed. It should’ve been. It was one of the many underlying causes Liv had that was causing her to binge and purge. The fact that this is never addressed left me feeling disgusted. It seemed like de la Cruz merely had Liv grabbed and groped as a plot point, and it just made me mad.

    Book Hulk mad.

    Honestly, the binging and purging, the binge drinking, and the random cutting were all plot points too you want me to get honest about it. The book shows that Liv’s under a lot of stress, but one meltdown and her life seemingly gets back together.

    That’s not how it works.

    An eating disorder, just like alcoholism, and self harm is something you’re going to deal with the rest of your life. You’re not going to get instantly better and be in a “good place” there’s lots of ups and downs and this book does not address it. We don’t get to see Liv struggle at the rehab center when she has to gain weight. We don’t see how she reacts to stress post rehab. She’s just fine and dandy, and that’s not how it is in real life. I get that de la Cruz might’ve wanted to end this on an uplifting note, but honestly it could’ve ended as uplifting with a little more realism.

    Though to be fair, the entire book lacked realism. Which brings me to my next issue the Paul Ryan Wannabe Dad.

    Maybe it’s because I REALLY hate Paul Ryan (dude, I and any other American with a somewhat functioning brain can through your shitty tax plan and we know you’re gunning for Medicaid and Social Security cuts, you pathetic Trump kissing asshole) but I kept associating him with the dad character throughout the book and in turn it made me hate him (the dad character not Ryan) even more than I probably should. Though to be fair, de la Cruz made him utterly despicable when he went off on his daughter for purposely getting herself an eating disorder because it was going to mess up his campaign for governor.

    Seriously, anyone who has an eating disorder is not going to get it on purpose. Personally, I would never vote for someone like Colin Blakey. It perplexes me how he’s even in fictional office-oh, wait…look who we have as POTUS in real life.

    Note, if you’re not that political and getting annoyed with these digressive rants about the currently controlled GOP congress and POTUS right now. Sorry, but not sorry. It’s relevant to the book and will be coming up a lot throughout the review. Here’s why. Maybe in 2012 I would’ve argued that Colin Blakey was a caricature at best. But I can’t now, because I totally could see a certain orange asshole writing a Tweet about how bulimia is a choice.

    I swear…

    Anyways, besides these things it bothered me how much in detail that de la Cruz went into how to purge. Look, I get that it’s easy to find out how to force yourself to purge but I really don’t like seeing it in such detail in a book when I know that there’s some impressionable 12 year old who’s probably going to read it and get as freaked out as I did when I read I was a 15 Year Old Blimp. To be sure, I don’t think this book was as bad as that one, but it did go into detail and while the side effects of the disorder were mentioned they didn’t go into such detail as they should’ve.

    Seriously, the most we hear about the MC’s side effects from binging is brief mention that read more or less like a Wikipedia article.

    The self harm bits were even more ridiculous and were more or less an after thought.

    I understand that de la Cruz was trying to write about a very sensitive and important issue, but it really did read like a melodrama after school special than anything else. It probably didn’t help that I didn’t connect to any of the characters.

    If I felt any emotion towards any of the characters it was hate. The Paul Ryan wannabe and the One Direction Wannabe/ Pervert boyfriend, and the pervert who randomly groped Liv I hated. I also hated Liv’s best friend, Antonia.

    We were told she was a good friend, but pretty much every time she and Liv hung out she’d ditch Liv and Liv was just suppose to be okay with it. That’s not how good friendships work, de la Cruz. Oh, and wait, said friend gets pissy at Liv when she’s assaulted because she didn’t stay to help her out with her date…

    Yeah, shitty friend.

    Healthy relationships were really something that this book failed at. The Paul Ryan wannabe dad is a prime example of this. All the characters in this book are doing everything to make HIM happy and not giving any consequences to anyone else. He has an aide that is outright mentally abusive towards his daughter, but Liv is suppose to deal because her dad needs to win the race.

    Note, the last thing I want for the state of California is a Paul Ryan Wannabe. Just saying…

    It doesn’t extend to just the father though. Liv’s mother forces her daughter to go to a shrink’s office, without telling her the therapy session is for her and literally ambushes her there when Liv was suppose to be there for the mother’s emotional support.

    I’m actually surprise that the shrink was okay with that. You don’t ambush someone like that in such a fragile mental state. Especially not like that, and then tell them that you’ll be disappointed in them if they don’t continue mommy daughter shrink time. That’s just asking for a dumpster fire.

    God, these people.

    The older brothers are shit douches too. One is a former addict and knows his sister is binging and let’s the behavior go on for months before telling the stupid mother. The other brother has relationship issues with his girlfriend (note the other brother was the LI in de la Cruz’s Something In Between).

    Oh, and there’s Liv’s other best friend/future love interest who is so bland that the only thing I know about him is he likes science, has a dead brother, and has surfer hair.

    I really can’t compute…

    Given the plot of this one, I thought this book would be very character driven. Eating disorders and self harm are complex issues and I felt like this book cheapened them to add “dramatics”. Like in all of de la Cruz’s books there is a ridiculous sense of privilege about the book. Though, in this particular book I think reality might’ve been suspended since I can’t see the cast of a CW show partying with high schoolers. I also can’t see the speaker of the house ditching his position to become governor, or that more attention and scrutiny will apply to the family for running for governor when they’re already the speaker’s kids.

    But whatever.

    Like I said this one is trigger inducing. I think something with this material could be gut wrenching. But I wasn’t bawling after reading this, instead it was one of those books I threw into the give away box. Only thing is, I sort of would feel guilty about donating this one to charity since I feel like there are a lot of things about this book that could cause potential harm.

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