Weave a Circle Round

Weave a Circle Round

The unexpected can move in next doorFreddy wants desperately to not be noticed. She doesn't want to be seen as different or unusual, but her step-brother Roland gets attention because he's deaf, and her little sister Mel thinks she's a private detective. All Freddy wants to do is navigate high school with as little trouble as possible.Then someone moves into the house on G...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Weave a Circle Round
Author:Kari Maaren
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Weave a Circle Round Reviews

  • Jack Stark

    Check out this review on my blog -

    5.373339 stars

    If you take the wonderful wacky imagination of children, put it in a bucket, put a lid on it, shake it all up, take off the lid and stick in your head - this novel is what you would end up with.

    I went into this thinking it was going to be a gentle, contemporary, coming of age, YA story with maybe a magical realism aspect.

    Our protagonist is Freddy Duch

    Check out this review on my blog -

    5.373339 stars

    If you take the wonderful wacky imagination of children, put it in a bucket, put a lid on it, shake it all up, take off the lid and stick in your head - this novel is what you would end up with.

    I went into this thinking it was going to be a gentle, contemporary, coming of age, YA story with maybe a magical realism aspect.

    Our protagonist is Freddy Duchamp - a 14yr old (not 10!) traversing through life. Her parents have divorced and she is living with her mum, step-dad, younger sister (Mel) and same age step-brother (Roland). Everything is relatively normal in the life of Freddy. She is somewhat of an introvert that enjoys spending time reading in peace and quiet. She has a couple of friends at school, but isn’t part of the popular crowd. She is remarkably good at not being remarkable. It’s a completely boring normal life. That is, until Cuerva Lachance and Josiah abruptly move in next door.

    Do not be fooled - this novel is not a gentle walk in the park.

    Josiah is also 14 years old, and so he starts at the same school as Freddy and Roland attend. He’s cocky, unsociable, short tempered, and generally disinterested in anything the teachers have to teach. He claims this is because he’s seen it all before. Although Josiah seems a bit quirky at times, Cuerva Lachance dials this up to 11. Never able to hold her attention on anything longer than 3 minutes, she’s impulsive and bizarre. One minute she may be eating a pear, the next she is painting something blue, the next she is chasing a squirrel up a tree.

    One day, Freddy is round Josiah and Cuerva Lachance’s and when she walks out the back door, she and Josiah time travel. Yep, just like that. We then go on a series of mini adventures learning about Josiah and Cuerva Lachance, who they are, why they moved into the area, and who is this mysterious Three that Josiah mentions.

    There were several moments through this when I thought,

    Then I would go back and reread the last page or so, and think

    I think the whole mantra to have when reading this is

    I’m being a little vague here as I really don’t want to spoil too much. Things happen out of the blue, with no build up or foresight at all. This can create a feeling of complete chaos at times. It appears that things happen for no reason but stick with it, because everything comes together so well towards the end.

    As regular readers of my reviews will know, I enjoy a story with diverse characters.

    Some characters are white, some are black, some are mixed race, some are chinese, some are African, some are Norse. Roland is deaf. This is not the defining character trait of Roland. I feel it would have been easy to write a deaf character that is a little oblivious to the world around him, as well as being a little stupid and having communication as being a difficulty for other characters. This is not what we have here. Roland lip-reads (as well as signs), and speaks to people in the same way as any other character would. Yes, he is deaf, but he is also a fully formed character as well. I have a 16 year old brother that is deaf, and so I can not express how happy I am to see such a positive representation of a deaf character. On a slightly more light-hearted note, there is a moment in the novel when Roland turns away from someone so he can’t see what they are saying to him. It is described in the story as the equivalent of a hearing person sticking fingers in their ears and yelling ‘lalalalala’. It reminded me of a moment several years back when my brother was being told off for something. He very calmly, and without breaking eye contact with the person telling him off, raised his hand to his ear and switched off his hearing aid. I found the moment completely hilarious. Not everyone in the room did.

    Anyway, if I had to criticize something about this, it would be that there are some moments that felt a little rushed. The quote ‘Don’t tell us, show us.’ popped into my head at a few points. But I am being super picky with that. It would have to be a 600 page novel to accommodate everything.

    The theme of chaos, order and the balance between the two is explored throughout. Complete chaos is… well, chaotic. But, order without a smattering of chaos is stale and boring. Through the balance between the two, we have creativity and human development. Another theme throughout is around destiny and free will. I am not a person that believes in luck or destiny. I believe things happen as a result of our actions. But this idea of whether we can change our destiny is explored really well.

    Other things I don’t have time to mention (or am I purposefully leaving them out? Who knows?):

    - DnD/Role Playing Games. NEEEEEERRRRRDDDDS. ;)

    - Everything adorable about Mel.

    - Characters from Mythology.

    - Literature references.

    - Poetry references.

    - Pizza.

    Kari Maaren has done an outstanding job of crafting a story that keeps you on the edge throughout. It feels whimsical on the surface, but with just a little consideration from the reader, it has so much depth and meaning. I will definitely be rereading this one. I’m sure there are little things throughout that I missed with my first read through.

    Anyway, I am off to play the organ badly. Peace and Love.

    Be my friend and chat with me on the

  • Cherry (_forevermint)

    AMAZING. I loved the time travel and the characters and the growth, ugh everything was just so enjoyable that I finished this in a day. Just thinking about it again makes me want to reread my favorite parts xD

  • Justine

    4.5 stars

    Wow, this was a really excellent and engaging book. It went so many unexpected places, and was very satisfying to read. Themes of family and self identity are nicely woven into a mystery adventure tale in the speculative fiction genre. The writing flows nicely, complimented by humorous dialogue and multi-dimensional characters. The kids are very much kids, and all the more interesting for it.

    There was a lot about this book that reminded me of

    by

    and a

    4.5 stars

    Wow, this was a really excellent and engaging book. It went so many unexpected places, and was very satisfying to read. Themes of family and self identity are nicely woven into a mystery adventure tale in the speculative fiction genre. The writing flows nicely, complimented by humorous dialogue and multi-dimensional characters. The kids are very much kids, and all the more interesting for it.

    There was a lot about this book that reminded me of

    by

    and also

    by

    , so if you liked either of those you should definitely check out Weave a Circle Round. This would be a great book for middle grade readers as well as older kids and adults who enjoy YA. A lovely and impressive debut novel that was worth the time it took to come to publication.

  • Lata

    Kind of weird and enjoyable take on time travel, friendships, step-siblings, and storytelling. Freddie is quietly angry about things at the start of this story: her parents’ divorce, her stepfather and her awkward and clumsy stepbrother Roland, her absent mother and stepfather. And there’s school and her concerted effort to not be noticeable, her minimal friends. Then two very odd people move in next door: Josiah and Cuerva Lachance. Strange things begin happening, with Roland attempting to warn

    Kind of weird and enjoyable take on time travel, friendships, step-siblings, and storytelling. Freddie is quietly angry about things at the start of this story: her parents’ divorce, her stepfather and her awkward and clumsy stepbrother Roland, her absent mother and stepfather. And there’s school and her concerted effort to not be noticeable, her minimal friends. Then two very odd people move in next door: Josiah and Cuerva Lachance. Strange things begin happening, with Roland attempting to warn her and her younger sister Mel away from the neighbours, while the neighbours behave strangely, including playing a pipe organ at odd hours. Things get progressively weirder, then, Freddie and Josiah go back in time.

    Freddie grows up a lot while figuring out what’s really happening with Josiah and Cuerva Lachance. I found the family tensions and Freddie’s resentments believable, while also enjoying the utter weirdness of her interactions with Cuerva Lachance and Josiah. And I have no idea why, but I love the name Cuerva Lachance!

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)

    2.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Weave A Circle Round was a book I’d been really looking forward to, but I realized almost as soon as I picked it up that it was going to be very different from what I had in mind. As a result, I found it to be a difficult read, though to be fair, my struggle with it was not so much in a “this is a terrible book” kind of way, but rather more in the sense that “This isn’t what I signed up for, and I want off this ride.”

    And

    2.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Weave A Circle Round was a book I’d been really looking forward to, but I realized almost as soon as I picked it up that it was going to be very different from what I had in mind. As a result, I found it to be a difficult read, though to be fair, my struggle with it was not so much in a “this is a terrible book” kind of way, but rather more in the sense that “This isn’t what I signed up for, and I want off this ride.”

    And to be honest, this story did feel a little like a roller coaster—albeit a nauseatingly chaotic one which would get bogged down and stuck at times. It follows fourteen-year-old Freddy, an awkward freshman who just wants to get through the next four years of high school without drawing too much attention. At home, she also prefers spending time by herself, making little effort to get to know her stepbrother Roland, who is deaf, or to get involved in her little sister Mel’s interests. Their parents are never around, so the kids are mostly left on their own to take care of themselves.

    Then one day, a woman and a teenage boy move into that peculiar house down on Grosvenor Street. There’s only one word that can describe Cuerva Lachance and Josiah: Strange. Impossible things seem to happen whenever they’re around, and nothing they say ever seems to make any sense. True to form, Freddy wants nothing to do with her new neighbors, but to her horror, Josiah turns up at her school the next day, and he’s in all her classes. Suddenly, all her efforts to stay under the radar are going out the window as Josiah seems bent on making a spectacle of himself in front of all the students and teachers while dragging a mortified Freddy along with him. Very soon, it becomes clear that Cuerva Lachance and Josiah are more than just a couple of your typical run-of-the-mill weirdos—they might not even be completely mortal. And for some reason, they seem way too interested in Freddy, Mel, and Roland.

    Beyond this, it’s really hard to describe the story without giving away some serious spoilers, so I’ll just leave one more little tiny nugget of detail here: Weave A Circle Round involves time travel. And yet, it’s not really a time travel book—at least in not in any conventional sense. Although we get to travel through a time portal, visiting such places and time periods such as Prehistoric China or Medieval Sweden, at its heart this book is a coming-of-age tale about growing up, accepting yourself, becoming a better person. As such, it wasn’t too surprising to find a lot of YA themes.

    That said, my main issue with Weave A Circle Round was the overall juvenile tone of the story, specifically the adolescent voice of the protagonist making this book feel more Middle Grade than Young Adult. By itself, this wouldn’t have been an insurmountable problem, as I actually quite enjoyed the mystery of the earlier chapters. Unfortunately, the childishness combined with the hot mess that was the time traveling sections eventually crushed my interest in the book’s second half. Moreover, the dialogue and antics of Cuerva Lachance and Josiah were so absurd that the characters came across more idiotic than endearing, making them both extremely unlikeable.

    Granted, I don’t always do well with “weird” books, and this one really tested my limits in that regard. There was just too much going on, with all these topics ranging from classic English poetry to Norse mythology simply thrown together without much coherence. The book’s themes of chaos vs. order also meant that the plot itself involved a fair bit of confusion, and at times I found it sluggish and hard to follow.

    All told, while Weave A Circle Round had a few high points, ultimately it failed to draw me in. I struggled to connect with the story or any of the characters, who either felt way too young or way too weird. Quite honestly, this was just not a book for me, but if you enjoy bizarre or uncanny stories with a lot of imagination and quirk, then you might want to take a look, and hopefully you’ll enjoy it more than I did.

  • MB (What she read)

    Sounds intriguing:

    After reading:

    I don't know about you, but I like my time-travel reading to contain lots of interesting historical details, along with anthropological, cultural, and sociological details and speculations about what life was actually like for our ancestors. (Like Gabaldon, Turtledove, Jodi Taylor, L'engle, Suzanne Frank, etc.)

    While I enjoyed the first part of this book (the set up), once the time traveling actually began, I was pretty mu

    Sounds intriguing:

    After reading:

    I don't know about you, but I like my time-travel reading to contain lots of interesting historical details, along with anthropological, cultural, and sociological details and speculations about what life was actually like for our ancestors. (Like Gabaldon, Turtledove, Jodi Taylor, L'engle, Suzanne Frank, etc.)

    While I enjoyed the first part of this book (the set up), once the time traveling actually began, I was pretty much bored stiff. In this book, time travel is only a plot device and the over a year of hopping around in time is just left almost entirely undescribed and vaguely hinted at. The big ending left me pretty much unexcited, so I was left with a pretty meh reading reaction.

    First part of book, 4 stars. Last part, 2.

    I'm interested in other readers opinions, as I feel guiltily like I'm being hard on a first-published author, for what for me was a book I was really excited about initially. Feel free to comment. I'd like to know what others think.

    I want to send this book back for revision, because I think it has the potential to be spectacular if it could just figure out what it wants to be when it grows up! Either dump the time travel entirely or flesh it out into something worthwhile, clean up all those loose ends and red herrings that don't go anywhere, and, please, for goodness sake, do something (flesh them out enough) to make us care more about these characters and the consequences of their supposedly epic choices!

    Entirely unsolicited reader advisory: If you'd like more of this kind of thing, you should look into the authors mentioned earlier. But for YA readers, please get your hands on some Diana Wynne-Jones! Try Eight Days of Luke or The Homeward Bounders, if you want something somewhat like this.

  • Claire (bookscoffeeandrepeat)

    This book was a chaotic mess.

    I don't even know where to start. I guess, the problem is that I'm not really interested in magical realism with a bit of science fiction combined into a fantasy type of story. Needless to say, I became confused and uninterested after a while. I enjoyed reading the story before reaching the 60% page mark. As I got closer to the end, I felt that the story just dragged on and on. It was almost pointless because I don't think I'm learning anything new about the characte

    This book was a chaotic mess.

    I don't even know where to start. I guess, the problem is that I'm not really interested in magical realism with a bit of science fiction combined into a fantasy type of story. Needless to say, I became confused and uninterested after a while. I enjoyed reading the story before reaching the 60% page mark. As I got closer to the end, I felt that the story just dragged on and on. It was almost pointless because I don't think I'm learning anything new about the characters nor the plot. I think the author was trying to explain an integral part of the story, but it wasn't executed in a way that I would've liked. Instead, it contributed to my confusion and I was bored. To even add to the mess, this book contains characters from Norse Mythology.

    There was very little (or in my case, ZERO) likable characters in the story. I don't dislike the protagonist but sometimes I don't like reading her POV. She was bullied a lot, her siblings don't care about her (except Mel, but there's something about her that irks me quite a bit), and her mother doesn't care about her. I mean, the parents are rarely at home! Mel irks me because she doesn't seem like a real person who has feelings. She's kind of like Sherlock, but Sherlock makes a lot more sense (as a character) to me than Mel. Then there's Roland, I don't really like him but I understand him more than Mel.

    I dislike how there is no conclusion to the story. In school, we don't know why Freddy is constantly being picked on and if it ever stopped. I don't understand where all the bullying comes from, why it's happening, and why it wasn't addressed. I also don't know what happens to the Norse mythology characters.

    Oh, and can I mention the parents again? They only care about their noise making neighbor but they never enquired about their children's affairs? This book is so weird and it doesn't even make any sense. Note that I like weird books but this book wasn't for me.

    If you like the complexities of time travel and the fact that Norse deities are a part of it, then I would recommend this book. If this isn't your cup of tea, I suggest picking another one.

  • Mel (Epic Reading)

    DNF @ 41%

    I love complex, weird, interesting fantasy/sci-fi books. Want me to believe in aliens, time travel, fantasy worlds, etc no problem BUT, you must give me a construct in which your world stands on. I don't need every detail or a complete explanation; but I do need a bit of a frame for the type of story I'm getting into and where it might be headed.

    I hate DNFing a book; but when I cannot come up with a single reason to keep reading and am dreading the book I know it's time to give up.

    DNF @ 41%

    I love complex, weird, interesting fantasy/sci-fi books. Want me to believe in aliens, time travel, fantasy worlds, etc no problem BUT, you must give me a construct in which your world stands on. I don't need every detail or a complete explanation; but I do need a bit of a frame for the type of story I'm getting into and where it might be headed.

    I hate DNFing a book; but when I cannot come up with a single reason to keep reading and am dreading the book I know it's time to give up.

    Weave a Circle Round fails at a fundamental story requirement; setting up some sort of existence for our characters that gives something to build from. If you aren't going to give a setting that helps give a logic to the story then at least make your characters really interesting. Unfortunately the characters are just as flat and uninteresting as the non-existent plot.

    I can follow a book for sometime that is failing at plot if I like the character(s) enough. Unfortunately Kari Maaren has not created any character that I cared about or was even intrigued by; including the crazy neighbours. They were all very generic, boring or otherwise unmemorable. Even our two weird neighbours, that seem to be the catalysts for everything that happens, weren't enough to keep me interested.

    At 40%+ of a novel I expect to have an idea about why things are happening or at least what is happening. Instead Maaren takes our main gal and sets her up for bullying at school; then suddenly she ends up in a Viking timeline with one of the crazy neighbours. Say um... what?!?

    There is zero indication about why this has happened or what it even means. Meanwhile the boy/crazy neighbour is clearly a time traveler with some sort of psychic power and yet still nothing fits into anything. For me it felt like each piece of the puzzle was from a different puzzle entirely that would never fit together. And frankly even if they do by the end I just didn't care about our people, the time travel or even what made the neighbours so odd.

    It's okay to take me on a wild fantasy ride but give me characters I can care about and some sort of pieces that appear to go together.

    I believe this book needs some serious review by beta readers to work on capturing the attention of the reader and giving nuggets of information that might fit together or at least intrigue the reader into continuing to read.

    It also needs some character help to make at least our main gal more relatable if not actually likeable.

    It surprises me that TOR published this. They are usually a solid publishing house. Somehow this one slipped through the cracks and got published. They might do well to pull it back and try again.

    For this and more of my reviews please visit my blog at:

  • Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)

    This review can also be found at

    .

    I didn't like this book at all. I thought about abandoning the book pretty early on and those thoughts seemed to pop up over and over with increased frequency. I don't know why I just didn't give up on this book and move on to something that I would enjoy more but for some reason, I kept pushing myself to keep listening for just a little bit more. I do think that this is a book that some readers will really enjoy but it wasn't the bo

    This review can also be found at

    .

    I didn't like this book at all. I thought about abandoning the book pretty early on and those thoughts seemed to pop up over and over with increased frequency. I don't know why I just didn't give up on this book and move on to something that I would enjoy more but for some reason, I kept pushing myself to keep listening for just a little bit more. I do think that this is a book that some readers will really enjoy but it wasn't the book for me and I should have stopped as soon as I started considering it.

    I found this book to be rather confusing at times. As I was trying to get into the book, I often found myself having to back up the audio to listen to sections again in an attempt to make sense of the story. Things happen that really make little to no sense and the story shifts time and place without a lot of explanation. There were times that multiple versions of the same character were in a scene which just added to the confusion. I had a hard time following the storyline at times.

    I didn't feel a connection to any of the characters. Freddy, Mel, and Roland were the most likable characters in the book but I never really felt any kind of connection to them. Mel and Roland play large roles in parts of the book but are absent in a large portion of the story. Josiah and Cuerva Lachance were incredibly strange. Cuerva Lachance may win the prize for the strangest character that I have read in all of her various forms. Josiah was hard to trust and it always seemed that he was hiding important things from Freddy. Freddy was the main character of the story and while we spend a lot of time in her head I still didn't feel like I truly understood her at the close of the book.

    I did enjoy the narration. This was the first time that I have listened to Eileen Stevens and I thought she did a good job with the book. Honestly, her narration is probably the reason that I continued to listen to the book even when I realized it wasn't going to work for me. She did an excellent job with all of the character voices and her voice was very pleasant to listen to. I would not hesitate to listen to her narration again in the future.

    I will not be recommending this book to others. There were parts of the book that I did like a lot more than others. I thought that the opening scene was well done and I generally liked all of the scenes with Freddy, Mel, and Roland a lot more than the parts of the book where the characters were twisting around in time. I do think that other readers may have a very different reaction to this book and may really enjoy it. I would say to give it a try if you think the concept sounds like something you would enjoy.

    Let's just say that I didn't like the book. At all. The narrator was good and there were some parts that were more interesting that others but as a whole this was not an enjoyable experience. The book was confusing to the point that I had to keep going back over parts to try to make sense of them. I found sections of the book to be incredibly boring and I never cared about any of the characters. Pretty early on in the book, I did consider abandoning the book but pushed myself on. I think I thought about marking the book as one I couldn't finish about once every 15 minutes of listening but for some reason I forced myself to continue. (Note to self - if you are thinking about marking a book dnf just too it and save yourself some pain.) I am honestly just glad that I finished it right now so that I can move on to a book that I will actually enjoy.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.