Pacifica

Pacifica

Marin is corsario royalty, a pirate like her father and his father before him. Sailing the ocean to chase adventure is in her blood. But these days no one cares that the island town her people call home is named after her grandfather. They have a new leader, one who promises an end to their hunger – and one who thinks that girls are meant for the kitchen or the brothel. Ma...

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Title:Pacifica
Author:Kristen Simmons
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Pacifica Reviews

  • Mindee Arnett

    Kristen Simmons has a gift for cultivating the sweetest of loves from the darkest of places. In Pacifica, she's created a bleak, futuristic world that's utterly believable and terrifying, and yet from out of it springs the greatest of hope, carried on the back of its fierce main characters. I was swept away.

  • Katie McGarry

    I read an early copy of this manuscript and loved it!

  • C.G. Drews

    I don't even know where to begin with this review?! Peoples, I absolutely freaking adored this one. I actually wasn't sure it'd work for me, as I'm not super keen on dystopian anymore. But it was

    . It absolutely swallowed my feels whole and I just (!!!)

    My emotions are all: !!!!!

    • pirates; badass epic conniving pirates

    • one of the best most wholesome friendships ever

    • shipping (rel

    I don't even know where to begin with this review?! Peoples, I absolutely freaking adored this one. I actually wasn't sure it'd work for me, as I'm not super keen on dystopian anymore. But it was

    . It absolutely swallowed my feels whole and I just (!!!)

    My emotions are all: !!!!!

    • pirates; badass epic conniving pirates

    • one of the best most wholesome friendships ever

    • shipping (relationships) on shipping (sea)

    • a dystopian with influences from the Japanese internment camps in WWII

    • PAIN AND BEAUTY

    The author has a note in the front (I also think she just did a twitter thread?) on how personal a story this is for her, because she based it on what her grandmother went through in WWII, losing everything after being imprisoned in a Japanese interment camp. And just reading her grandma's comeback and epicness and how she valued family above everything she suffered...I JUST AM SO GRATEFUL THE AUTHOR WROTE THIS. It's powerful and you can feel the emotion on every. single. page. omg.

    The friendships. 10/10. I think the reason I generally go "eh" to dystopians is it's all world building and blah blah...but this actually put the characters FIRST and they were so complex and dimensional!! (The world building is also epic lmao do not think anything is bad here. I'm just going to gush the whole time. Hold onto your sailing hats.)

    He's the president's son (+ has an

    ) and he's really privileged and clueless to what is REALLY happening in their wreck of a world. But he's like so sweet?? He is SO PURE and he is so loyal and loving towards his BFF, Adam, and Ross is just amazing.

    He's the vice-president's son and used to be one of the super power/shunned people, but his family's risen up. But he's all neat and put together and pleasant, although a lot more *knowing* of the world. And I LOVE ADAM. I love his and Ross' friendship. <3

    She is the epic pirate oF ALL OUR DREAMS. (Basically if Lila Bard x Kell had a daughter; it would be Marin.) She's like super conniving but her absolute dream is to just be loved/have a family. SHE'S SO BADASS BUT SWEET and the combo just made her leap off the page! Get this woman some knives. Also she built a boat and has a secretly dark pirate past and just...MARIN. I love Marin.

    I LOVE THEM ALL.

    Like obviously Marin/Ross is the romantic ship here, but Ross/Adam were just so pure and epic. I

    like how people kept insinuating Ross was in love with Adam and he reacted with disgust. Like mate, do not. But I also get that it's really frustrating that romance seems to always trump relationships here. I am for queer relationships, obviously. But I am

    for epic friendships so so much.

    How on earth does this book build such amazing characters AND such a complex and detailed world??! Like it's a frikkin' standalone and it DOES IT ALL. It's basically this dystopian world were everything is trash and falling apart and gross. They're trying to send the poor people off to this "utopia island" but...does it even exist? Marin says no. The president says yes. EVERYONE MIGHT DIE WHO CAN TELL. I just could totally

    the whole world, with the islands of trash, and the broken down slums, and the contrasted virtual palace of the rich. Afjdskald it was incredible.

    I mean I never got totally shocked (except for that ONE REVEAL about Marin's family) but it was perfect!! Pacing = amazing. I wAs never bored. The only thing that was tired was my eyeballs from the tiny font (omg look out the way while I change my name to Paper Granny). But it was so compelling, with the riots and kidnappings, the boating and eating radioactive fish (that seems...bad for you BUT OK) and the vicious pirates and beatings.

    And that bit at the end WHERE ALL THE FEELS HAPPENED.

    It totally took me by surprise ok?! I didn't expect to get this invested. The characters are the most precious light of my life and I'm sad that there's only one book!! A+ FOR EVERYTHING. I LOVED IT.

  • Alyssa

    I

    this book. So much. OMG.

    ***

    ***

    Pacifica by Kristen Simmons

    Publisher: Tor Teen

    Publication Date: March 6, 2018

    Rating: 5 stars

    Source: Review copy sent by the publisher

    Summary (from Goodreads):

    Marin is cosario royalty, a pirate like her father and his father before him. Sailing the ocean to chase adventure is in her blood. But these days no one cares that the island town her people call home is named after her grandfather. They h

    I

    this book. So much. OMG.

    ***

    ***

    Pacifica by Kristen Simmons

    Publisher: Tor Teen

    Publication Date: March 6, 2018

    Rating: 5 stars

    Source: Review copy sent by the publisher

    Summary (from Goodreads):

    Marin is cosario royalty, a pirate like her father and his father before him. Sailing the ocean to chase adventure is in her blood. But these days no one cares that the island town her people call home is named after her grandfather. They have a new leader, one who promises an end to their hunger – and one who thinks that girls are meant for the kitchen or the brothel. Marin knows she's meant for more than that, and with the sudden influx of weapons on the island, and rumors of a pending deal with the enemy oil nation in her wake, she knows a big score to gain the council's favor is the only way to save her people, and herself.

    Ross lives a life of privilege. As the president's son he wants for nothing, but he longs for a life of adventure. On a dare, he convinces his best friend Adam to sneak out to the Docks, the site of local race riots between the poor Shorlings and the upper class. But when Adam is arrested along with the other Shorlings, and not even the president is willing to find him, Ross finds himself taking matters into his own hands. He journeys back into the Docks, ready to make deals with anyone, even a beautiful pirate, if it means Adam's safe return.

    When Marin and Ross meet in dangerous Shoreling territory he sees a way to get his friend back and she sees her ticket home. The ransom a president’s son would command could feed her people for years and restore her family’s legacy. But somewhere in the middle of the ocean, Marin must decide if her heart can handle handing over the only person who has ever seen her as more than a pirate.

    What I Liked:

    I expected to enjoy this book, because I've read all except one of Simmons' books, and I've loved all of them. (I reaaaaaally need to read Three. Why am I so bad at finishing series.) I really trust Simmons and I honestly didn't even read the synopsis very closely, because I knew I had to have this book. Here's the thing: not only did I enjoy Pacifica, but I loved it. I fell into this story and I didn't want to stop reading until I was finished, which is exactly what happened. There are so many things about this book that absolutely worked for me, and I hope I can convince others to give this thought-provoking a novel a chance.

    This is the story of Marin, a corsario living on mainland, struggling to feed herself and live a semblance of a good life. It is also the story of Ross, the president's son who has everything at his fingertips. Everything, that is, until one bad decision costs him, and he finds himself caught up in the madness of Pacifica. What exactly is Pacifica - is it the green paradise in the middle of a clear blue ocean that the government wants everyone to believe? Why is the government "choosing" five hundred Shorelings to go? What's really out there? Marin and Ross meet in uncertain circumstances but must work together to stay alive, and discover the truth about Pacifica.

    This book is told from third-person dual POV, with each chapter being told by either Marin or Ross. Their mutual story converges fairly quickly and they meet when Ross and his friend Adam decide to leave the fancy government party celebrating Pacifica and the pending lottery to go out and watch the riots. Marin isn't trying to be in the riots, but she needs to make a deal with someone, and that someone is where the riots are. The riots throw Marin, Ross, and Adam together, but only Marin and Ross make it out. Ross is determined to find Adam no matter the cost, and Marin knows that Adam is going to be taken to Pacifica. This is how Marin and Ross find themselves in a predicament - find Pacifica, find Adam. Marin needs the money, Ross needs his friend back... but they both get much more danger and shocking discoveries than they expected.

    Once Marin and Ross set out to find Adam, I was completely hooked. I mean, I was hooked before then, but I was totally dialed in and anxious to read more, by the time Marin and Ross take to the seas. By then you must know that Pacifica isn't what it is made out to be, the government isn't being truthful, and the Shorelings are being taken somewhere to die - or worse. So many secrets! So much danger. This story was rife with high stakes, and an all-or-nothing type of adventure.

    I really felt for Marin, who is such a strong and capable young lady trying to live in emptiness and nothings. She isn't a Shoreling - she was born a corsario (pirate) - but she is just as trapped as the other Shorelings scraping by to eat and survive. Marin was brought up to be tough and a survivor, but she has a soft heart underneath the thorns. There is a lot of complexity and grey area when it comes to Marin, and my heart broke for her throughout the story.

    Despite Ross living a lavish, pampered life as the president's son, I connected with and liked him from the start. He is so noble and loyal, which we get to see over and over in the book. He listens and observes and has an open mind. He has a soft heart, like Marin. Ross is a paradox, but aren't we all?

    The world of this story is a brutal world, a world set in the somewhat far future, but a world that is quite possible and could very well happen. There is very little clean water in this world, and absolutely no ice/icebergs/polar icecaps. There is little food, little shelter, little oil, little of everything. The world is in ruin, for many reasons, and there are few options for many people. This is how Pacifica came into works by politicians. You'll have to read more to find out what Pacifica really is...

    I really, really appreciated the harsh environmental themes of this book. Climate change is at the forefront, with the melted ice, rising sea levels, disappearing coasts, acidic water. I'm an environmental engineer and climate change is something we studied very heavily in school, as well as water quality and the future of the environment. The author did not shy away from the details and nuances of a world ravaged by climate change, and I appreciated this. This could be the future, fam.

    Another thing I appreciated (though it made me so sad) was how much the story of Pacifica reminded me of some good old US history. Doesn't it sound familiar? Sending five hundred of X type of people to what is basically a prison, telling them it's for their own good and safety, that they'll be able to have a better life there? This happened not too long ago, in US history. I was thinking about this as I was reading the book, and how familiar the idea seemed, and how there was conflict on both sides of everything, and way too many innocent people that deserved better. Read the author's note at the end of the book when you get a chance. After reading the book, I read the author's note, and my heart broke. The author knew exactly what she was doing, and what type of story she was telling, and this... this made me appreciate the story even more. Props to you, Kristen Simmons. Pacifica is so important from an environmental point-of-view, but just as much or maybe even more so from a historical and social and political point-of-view.

    The author clearly did her research, not just on the environmental issues, or when it came to the mechanics of sailing a ship. She really captured history in this book, without writing a historical fiction novel.

    I adored was the romance, as subtle and slow-burning as it was. There is no love triangle (and I only make this statement because yes, while Adam might be considered a very important secondary character, he isn't a love interest or anything like that. Not even close.). There is no insta-love between Ross and Marin, but rather a slow building of feelings and closeness. I loved their relationship, from perfect strangers on the the extremes of the societal totem pole, to two people who need to trust each other and depend on each other to survive. Like I said, the romance is very slow-burn and not something I was really thinking about as the story was progressing, but it was something that crept up on me and I appreciated the subtlety. Yes, there is kissing in this book!

    The ending of this book is very hopeful, from all standpoints. Nothing is perfect and riding off into the sunset, but many political decisions were made about this and that, and so we know change has been happening. And on the romantic side of things, the ending is really sweet.

    I could probably gush about this book some more. I loved the story and I would reread it again in a heartbeat (and I think I will!). It's not a fluffy, fun story to read - it's an intense, sometimes dark story that sheds some light into the potential future of the world. It's honestly not so far off. This story is so important and I hope many people read it, especially teenagers, who are our future.

    What I Did Not Like:

    I really can't think of anything so I'll be skipping this section!

    Would I Recommend It:

    I really recommend this book. Yes, I'm an environmental engineer and former environmental engineering student and I'm super excited about a post-apocalyptic/dystopia novel focusing so heavily on the future of the environment and consequences and climate change. But I also loved the story of Ross and Marin, two people coming from very different backgrounds to change everything. I loved the message of the story and how it reflected on a dark time in US history. I can't recommend this book enough; it is fiction, but it is also reality.

    Rating:

    5 stars. Pacifica is a thought-provoking, moving novel that exposes a future that could very well be reality for the world. This book should be in classrooms, among students and teachers. Fiction is great for escape, but it can teach us so much. I am never disappointed by Simmons and I'm glad Pacifica was such a hit for me. I hope many readers share the same sentiment!

  • alice (arctic books)

    Once again, Kristen Simmons creates a vivid post-apocalyptic world view, this time focusing on climate change and the effect it has on the future. PACIFICA is filled with action-packed scenes, a tender romance, and a harrowing and intriguing setting.

    PACIFICA follows Marin, a cosario (think pirate), and Ross, the son of the President in this futuristic government. As their paths cross, they figure out the truth about Pacifica, the tropical island to which five hundred citizens are to be sent. I i

    Once again, Kristen Simmons creates a vivid post-apocalyptic world view, this time focusing on climate change and the effect it has on the future. PACIFICA is filled with action-packed scenes, a tender romance, and a harrowing and intriguing setting.

    PACIFICA follows Marin, a cosario (think pirate), and Ross, the son of the President in this futuristic government. As their paths cross, they figure out the truth about Pacifica, the tropical island to which five hundred citizens are to be sent. I immensely enjoyed the discussion of climate change, especially the timeline that depicted the effects of climate change and the disintegration of the world as we know it.

    Told in alternating perspectives of Marin and Ross, PACIFICA was incredibly unique and creative. The characters were lovely to read about, if a little dense (such as Ross and his unbelievable stupidity). The only reservation that I have is that the unfolding of the Pacifica scandal was a bit difficult and confusing to interpret when I read it.

    Overall, PACIFICA is a solid futuristic standalone that probes deeply into the effects and dangers of climate change. If you enjoy adventure, post-apocalyptic settings, and a kick-ass heroine like Marin, be sure to check this book out!

    Thank you to Tor for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  • Karen’s Library

    In Pacifica, Kristen Simmons gives us a scary realistic near future post apocalyptic world where the Melt has covered much of the landmasses with water.

    Kristen bases much of the story on an island of garbage (and this is based on reality! Look up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch which is twice the size of Texas!) where the Eighty-Sixers (pirates) live.

    I really enjoyed the characters of Ross, Marin, and Alex. Marin was a strong kickass female lead with a good heart.

    I thoroughly enjoined this book

    In Pacifica, Kristen Simmons gives us a scary realistic near future post apocalyptic world where the Melt has covered much of the landmasses with water.

    Kristen bases much of the story on an island of garbage (and this is based on reality! Look up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch which is twice the size of Texas!) where the Eighty-Sixers (pirates) live.

    I really enjoyed the characters of Ross, Marin, and Alex. Marin was a strong kickass female lead with a good heart.

    I thoroughly enjoined this book and found the ending exceptionally satisfying! I’m looking forward to reading more from Kristen.

  • Aimee ♥ | Aimee, Always

    This book shows a world of trash--literally. In this dystopian world, everything we

    done to save Mother Nature has taken its toll. Global warming went to an extreme; all the icebergs in the world melted; miles and miles of trash make the seas almost inhabitable.

    At first, Marin was just your typical, I-need-redemption-so-I-need-to-be-badass heroine. She grew

    throughout

    This book shows a world of trash--literally. In this dystopian world, everything we

    done to save Mother Nature has taken its toll. Global warming went to an extreme; all the icebergs in the world melted; miles and miles of trash make the seas almost inhabitable.

    At first, Marin was just your typical, I-need-redemption-so-I-need-to-be-badass heroine. She grew

    throughout the novel, proving to be loyal, compassionate, and resourceful. She always had the welfare of the common people in mind, and she always put them before herself. And she always stayed true to her word!

    See, there's a

    as to why the main dude, Ross, is this way--he's the President's son, so obviously, he grew up shielded from the harsh realities of the world. He didn't know how to sail a boat; he didn't know how to fight on the streets. But he tried his best!!! His desire to serve his people well was so obvious, and so genuine. He was such a pure, loving soul.

    The writing was alright, technically, but it made me feel a bit disconnected from the characters and from the story. It took me a while to finally get into the book, and it was mostly because of the lovely characters, and nothing to do with the zero-personality writing.

    It took me a while to finally tell myself, "Yup, this one has a romance!" I didn't think it would have, based on the first 50% of the book or so, which was okay. BUT!!! The romance actually made things a bit better. Okay, okay. It was a

    bit too fast-paced to be

    , but I did like the dynamics between the two characters. They were respectful towards each other, and never pushed the other too far.

    Ross has this best friend, Adam, who was a Shoreling--AKA he wasn't born wealthy. When he was bullied, or when other people looked down on him, Ross always stood up for him. And when Adam was kidnapped, Ross

    considered sitting back and letting someone else find him. He went out of his way, doing things he knew he couldn't really do, just to find his best friend.

    I'll try not to spoil anything, but this is one of those books where some things happen behind the scenes, so we don't really know how things

    to the ending, and we just know what the actual ending was. This wasn't really a big issue for me, though. This book was still a really solid, and relevant read.

    [Actual rating: 3.5 stars]

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    I had high hopes for Pacifica, even more so after I read the author’s foreword and realized the story was in part inspired by the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II—a topic that gets touched upon relatively rarely in this genre. And yet, despite the book’s poignant themes, I felt that much of their significance was lost amidst some plot, pacing, and characterization issues. I still had a good time with th

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    I had high hopes for Pacifica, even more so after I read the author’s foreword and realized the story was in part inspired by the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II—a topic that gets touched upon relatively rarely in this genre. And yet, despite the book’s poignant themes, I felt that much of their significance was lost amidst some plot, pacing, and characterization issues. I still had a good time with the novel overall, but ultimately it failed to reach the heights I expected.

    The future is bleak in Pacifica, which opens in the year 2193 featuring a world ravaged by natural disasters and epidemics. The North American continent has become unrecognizable after numerous changes to the land and flooding, and what used to be the state of California is now an archipelago. Noram City, the capital of what’s left of the country, is home to both the elites who live safely at high elevations and to the indigent Shoreling population who struggle to survive down near the coasts. With resources dwindling, the government has proposed a new bill called the Relocation Act which will resettle five hundred of Noram’s poorest citizens on a new island called Pacifica.

    Understandably, the announcement was met with mixed reactions. Some Shorelings were optimistic, hoping to be chosen for the voyage so that they would have a chance at a fresh start. Others, however, were more skeptical. After all, if Pacifica was such a wonderful paradise, why weren’t the wealthy citizens clamoring to be the ones to go there first?

    As the unease sweeps through the city in response to the Relocation Act, Ross Torres, the seventeen-year-old son of the president, gets it into his head to have a bit of fun. Along with his friend Adam Baker, the vice president’s son, the two young men decide to sneak past their security details to check out the riots, subsequently falling into a situation they can’t handle. In the chaos, they meet Marin, the exiled daughter of a pirate king who was in the wrong place at the wrong time, finding herself caught up in the protests. When Adam becomes separated and abducted in violence, Ross is forced to team up with Marin, taking to the seas with her in order to rescue his friend.

    This book took a long time to take off. Admittedly, before I knew more about the story, I was drawn to Pacifica because of the promise of pirates and seafaring adventures. Well, none of this good stuff came until much later, because first we had to sit through a long intro of politics and getting to know our protagonists—none of whom were very likeable, if I’m to be honest. Ross’s character was a study in stupidity and arrogance, who just couldn’t seem to take responsibility for his own mistakes or see beyond his own self-interests. It’s also terribly unoriginal, i.e. the rich politician’s son who doesn’t get enough freedom or attention because dad’s too busy with work and mom’s too doped up on prescription drugs. Marin herself fares no better, embodying the cliché of the pirate princess with a heart of gold, complete with a mandatory soft spot for orphaned children. The world-building isn’t very imaginative either; it’s the same old post-apocalyptic dystopian scenario with the earth all messed up because of climate change, and strained resources leading to a huge disparity between the rich and the poor.

    But as predictable as this story gets, things do pick up considerable around the halfway point when Ross and Marin finally set sail. Also, fans of YA romance will probably enjoy this book, since I found that aspect to be done very well. More authors should take a page from Pacifica when it comes to gradually exploring and establishing trust between characters before proceeding with the romance. Ross also makes leaps and bounds with regards to his personal growth and development—even if all those changes were to be expected. In spite of this, reading about his eventual epiphany and insight into the situation made the journey worth it in the end.

    In sum, more focus on the deeper and more important issues coupled with less reliance on well-trodden tropes would have probably made this one better. While nothing about Pacifica really blew me away or made it stand out from other YA books in the same genre, the story provided an entertaining diversion (especially once it gained momentum in the second half), making this a decent choice if you’re looking for a light, fluffy read.

  • Fafa's Book Corner

    Mini review:

    DNF

    GR Ultimate Summer Reading Challenge: Ocean Blue.

    Kristen Simmons is an author who I've known about for awhile. When I heard about Pacifica I decided to give it a go. Unfortunately it wasn't for me.

    Before deciding to buy Pacifica (not in my library) I read the sample. I was intrigued! The world was interesting, and the characters were good! I was really looking forward to reading it. I was just going to wait a few days before I bought. Those days passed and I completely forgot abo

    Mini review:

    DNF

    GR Ultimate Summer Reading Challenge: Ocean Blue.

    Kristen Simmons is an author who I've known about for awhile. When I heard about Pacifica I decided to give it a go. Unfortunately it wasn't for me.

    Before deciding to buy Pacifica (not in my library) I read the sample. I was intrigued! The world was interesting, and the characters were good! I was really looking forward to reading it. I was just going to wait a few days before I bought. Those days passed and I completely forgot about Pacifica.

    I came to realize while I enjoyed it, Pacifica just wasn't memorable for me. What I read just didn't have any real impact on me. After this realization I just couldn't bring myself to read the whole book. Why waste my time? And write a bad review in the end.

    I still recommend. This was a personal thing.

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