Between the Lines

Between the Lines

Darrian dreams of writing for the New York Times. To hone his skills and learn more about the power of words, he enrolls in Mr. Ward's class, known for its open-mic poetry readings and boys vs. girls poetry slam. Everyone in class has something important to say, and in sharing their poetry, they learn that they all face challenges and have a story to tell--whether it's abo...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Between the Lines
Author:Nikki Grimes
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Between the Lines Reviews

  • Carla

    Always love reading anything by Nikki Grimes. Meeting these kids and hearing their stories, especially Jenesis, will really touch you.

  • Kate Olson

    @kidlitexchange #partner ~ I loved Bronx Masquerade and I loved this one EVEN MORE! Although it can stand alone, I definitely think that these titles are best read in sequence so that readers can see Tyrone's evolution and how the popularity of the slam poetry class grows. The characters in BETWEEN THE LINES address topics of family, race, immigration, racial profiling, foster care and many other hard-hitting topics in heartbreaking and insightful ways.

    Told through accessible prose and exceptio

    @kidlitexchange #partner ~ I loved Bronx Masquerade and I loved this one EVEN MORE! Although it can stand alone, I definitely think that these titles are best read in sequence so that readers can see Tyrone's evolution and how the popularity of the slam poetry class grows. The characters in BETWEEN THE LINES address topics of family, race, immigration, racial profiling, foster care and many other hard-hitting topics in heartbreaking and insightful ways.

    Told through accessible prose and exceptional verse, this title is a required purchase for high schools ~ there are drug references and some cursing, so individual librarians and teachers will need to make the call on whether this is a good fit for their middle school. I will be including it in my combined middle/high library and will have no issues with middle school students reading it.

  • Laura Gardner

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for Between the Lines & Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes.

    Between the Lines is a companion novel to the Coretta Scott King award winning Bronx Masquerade, a book about a group of students who find the power of poetry together in their English class. Now Mr. Ward has a new group of students in his English class in Between the Lines and yet again they're finding that poetry has the ability to bring diverse groups together.

    First things first, those covers! I love the new look; I have t

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for Between the Lines & Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes.

    Between the Lines is a companion novel to the Coretta Scott King award winning Bronx Masquerade, a book about a group of students who find the power of poetry together in their English class. Now Mr. Ward has a new group of students in his English class in Between the Lines and yet again they're finding that poetry has the ability to bring diverse groups together.

    First things first, those covers! I love the new look; I have the original cover of Bronx Masquerade in my library and the student on the cover looks a bit young. I love the juxtaposition of the words with the young teens on the updated covers; Bronx Masquerade looks like it has graffiti on it and Between the Lines is covered with newspaper headlines. I can't wait to see these in hardcover!

    Bronx Masquerade was published 16 years ago, but in rereading it this week it still felt as relevant and raw as the first time I read it.

    Between the Lines is no less powerful.

    In its pages we meet Darrian, an aspiring reporter who is convinced that learning to write poetry will hone his writing skills. Darrian narrates through Between the Lines, sharing his headline for each of his peers. We also meet Li, a Chinese American student who wants to prove she is more than just academics. We also meet Jenesis, who has lived in thirteen different foster homes and has walls built up to protect her heart; Freddie, a young girl who cares for her drug-addicted sister's young child, as well as her alcoholic mother; Marcel, who carries his anger like a shield, among others. Each student opens up through their verse and begins to connect with their peers, ultimately coming together to do a girls vs. boys poetry slam at the conclusion of the book.

    These types of books may be difficult for some readers who either struggle to keep the different students straight or wish there was more of a plot. Nevertheless, characters in both books are growing and changing, connecting with each other and their poetry is deeply affecting in many cases. Issues addressed include race, police brutality, immigration, foster care and other important issues in sensitive ways

  • Laura (bbliophile)

    This was a wonderful and very powerful read.

  • Donalyn

    Fabulous stand-alone companion to Bronx Masquerade.

  • Diayll

    4.5 out of 5 Controllers

    ARC from Publisher/Blog Tour

    Me

    This is my first novel by Nikki Grimes and I have to admit, anytime I read a book from a new author I’m concerned I either won’t enjoy it or I won’t be able to relate to it on a personal level. However, with its easygoing prose and relevant, deeply compelling storytelling, Between the Lines not only made me feel an array of emotions, it left me with a newfound love of

    4.5 out of 5 Controllers

    ARC from Publisher/Blog Tour

    Me

    This is my first novel by Nikki Grimes and I have to admit, anytime I read a book from a new author I’m concerned I either won’t enjoy it or I won’t be able to relate to it on a personal level. However, with its easygoing prose and relevant, deeply compelling storytelling, Between the Lines not only made me feel an array of emotions, it left me with a newfound love of myself.

    The story is told through multiple perspectives, high school students each with their own goals and aspirations who are battling emotional wounds because of their personal situations at home. Our main perspective comes from Darrian, a Puerto Rican student who lives with his father and dreams of writing for The New York Times. His goal is to tell a true narrative about people who seemingly get misrepresented in media, namely people from diverse backgrounds who are not the white majority. Through his eyes we get a glimpse of the other students in his class, how they view themselves versus how he views them. This was an interesting dynamic between the characters. Most of the time, people have a different perception of themselves despite what people on the outside may see.

    Darrian was an inquisitive young man who wanted to know and learn about the people around him and why they saw themselves a certain way. Interestingly enough, a lot of what the characters were dealing with are issues our youth deal with today: single parent family, parent’s goals for you verses your own, foster care system, parents in jail, just being a brown person at the wrong place at the wrong time. And how does one live with that? How does a person, despite the odds being stacked against them, peruse their dreams and become something better, something greater? I think this is the most profound question the novel asks and it is one worth asking again and again. Not everyone is given the same opportunities to succeed and until that disparity is challenged, we have to guide our youth to make the right decisions and help them discover who they are in this mixed-up world.

    Overall, I absolutely adore this novel. The rich poetry leaves the reader with an appreciation for the beauty of language and culture while managing to covey the hardships of life no matter a person’s ethnicity or background. There is something in here for everyone that I believe any young person (even some adults) can benefit from. Whether you’re looking for a novel to inspire your children or to give insight on cultural inequalities, or for just plain fun, please give Between the Lines a try. You won’t be disappointed.

  • Lauren

    3.5-4 stars. I loved the style of having a main narrator while also getting different POVs and poems from the other characters and learning about their diverse backgrounds and home situations. The headlines scattered throughout were a great touch, with one of my favorites being GIRL ATLAS BALANCES THE WORLD because it's so dang relatable.

  • Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus

    Darrian really wants to be a news reporter, and a teacher suggests that if he really wants to learn to write, he should investigate poetry. He signs up for a poetry class in high school where all of the students are working toward doing a poetry slam. They all have different issues (negligent parents, parents out of work, foster care, etc.) but use poetry to help understand their world and the other students. The chapters alternate between characters, and the poems writt

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus

    Darrian really wants to be a news reporter, and a teacher suggests that if he really wants to learn to write, he should investigate poetry. He signs up for a poetry class in high school where all of the students are working toward doing a poetry slam. They all have different issues (negligent parents, parents out of work, foster care, etc.) but use poetry to help understand their world and the other students. The chapters alternate between characters, and the poems written by the students for assignments are included.

    Strengths: I liked that this is set in a high school, but there isn't any inappropriate language or situations. There is some tentative romance, lots of problems with home life, and a lot of interest in writing. The cover is really nice.

    Weaknesses: I wish the poems had all been in different, distinctive voices the way that Frost did in Keesha's House. All the poems sounded the same to me.

    What I really think: This just didn't do much for me. This is most likely because I tried to write poetry in high school and college, and while I had some success, writing poetry or going in to journalism is a cruel thing to encourage a student to do for a career.

  • Lulu (the library leopard)

    Was this a perfect novel? No. There was a lot of summary and the combination of very short chapters + tons of POVs sometimes confused me.

    However, I loved reading about these characters finding their self-worth and voices through poetry. This book also tackles a lot of important issues like the foster care system, immigration, and the way the War on Drugs unfairly affects people of color in a way that felt naturally worked into the character's lives. The character's voices also felt more distingu

    Was this a perfect novel? No. There was a lot of summary and the combination of very short chapters + tons of POVs sometimes confused me.

    However, I loved reading about these characters finding their self-worth and voices through poetry. This book also tackles a lot of important issues like the foster care system, immigration, and the way the War on Drugs unfairly affects people of color in a way that felt naturally worked into the character's lives. The character's voices also felt more distinguishable than the first book, which I appreciated. I also think this book had some better emotional payoff at the final poetry slam than the first one did–there's several plot lines that all converge and pay off, rather than the novel just ending. (I would have like to see more of the actual poetry slam, though.) Overall, I would recommend!

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.