Love, Hate & Other Filters

Love, Hate & Other Filters

A searing #OwnVoices coming-of-age debut in which an Indian-American Muslim teen confronts Islamophobia and a reality she can neither explain nor escape--perfect for fans of Angie Thomas, Jacqueline Woodson, and Adam Silvera.American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending...

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Title:Love, Hate & Other Filters
Author:Samira Ahmed
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Love, Hate & Other Filters Reviews

  • Korrina  (OwlCrate)

    Gosh, I don’t know where to begin. I already know this book will be on my top books of 2018. I feel like this is one of those books that has changed how I see the world a little bit. That taught me things.

    I fell in love with Maya’s character immediately. I wanted to be her best friend. I wanted to stand by her side through everything she went through. The writing was perfect and in every sentence I could feel that this was the story of Samira Ahmed’s heart. I’m so grateful that she shared this s

    Gosh, I don’t know where to begin. I already know this book will be on my top books of 2018. I feel like this is one of those books that has changed how I see the world a little bit. That taught me things.

    I fell in love with Maya’s character immediately. I wanted to be her best friend. I wanted to stand by her side through everything she went through. The writing was perfect and in every sentence I could feel that this was the story of Samira Ahmed’s heart. I’m so grateful that she shared this story with the world. I will buy any work this author publishes in the future - she’s fantastic!

    This is such an important book, and I hope it gets the love it deserves. Similar in importance to The Hate U Give, I hope this book stays on the NYT list for as long as it can, and that people continue to pick it up. I can’t recommend it enough.

  • Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

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    LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS seems to be being billed as the Muslim version of Angie Thomas's THE HATE U GIVE. Superficially, they have similar plots: both feature young women of color who, while firmly entrenched within their respective culture, struggle with balancing the "American" part of their heritage when faced with so many contradictions. Also in both books, the girls must reconcile their identities with a racially-geared tragedy,

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    LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS seems to be being billed as the Muslim version of Angie Thomas's THE HATE U GIVE. Superficially, they have similar plots: both feature young women of color who, while firmly entrenched within their respective culture, struggle with balancing the "American" part of their heritage when faced with so many contradictions. Also in both books, the girls must reconcile their identities with a racially-geared tragedy, and deal with the ensuing onslaught of hate and bigotry that ensues.

    The problem with this comparison is that THE HATE U GIVE is a much better book. It's raw, angry, passionate, and politically charged - daring in a way that LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS is not. That isn't to say that LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS is a bad book - it isn't - but it isn't as moving or as powerful as THE HATE U GIVE. To say it bluntly: I can easily see THE HATE U GIVE being taught in schools as a modern classic, like Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK, or Sandra Cisnero's THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET. I can't say the same for LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS.

    Setting such unfair comparisons aside, though, this is a very good book - and it's an #OwnVoices book to boot. The story is about seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz, a Muslim Indian born to immigrant parents who resides in Batavia, Illinois. She has dreams of dating and kissing boys, and wants to pursue her interest in photography and movies by studying film in New York. Her parents are very strict, however, and want her to stay closer to home, in a more traditional profession, like being a lawyer.

    Maya has friends, and has crushes on two very different boys over the course of the novel. She loves her parents, but also chafes at their more traditional outlook. It seems like it's going to be a typical coming-of-age story, as viewed through and Indian and a Muslim lens, but then tragedy strikes, and Maya and her family find themselves thrown into the spotlight when a building in Chicago is bombed by a terrorist, and one of the 'suspects' has the same last name as Maya and her family.

    There are many wonderful aspects to this book. I really enjoyed how central Maya's culture is to the book, and how much of a focus her burgeoning identity as not just a young woman but also an artist and a Musliam American-Indian plays in the story. There are the expected references to Bollywood and

    , but the book also covers tradition, dating, arranged marriage, education, family, love, and disappointment. The book also deals with bigotry and Islamophobia, and interwoven with Maya's narrative is that of the bomber himself.

    I honestly thought this latter portion was the most interesting, because of what wasn't said. It's very subtle, but if you watch the news, you'll pick up on it quickly. All too often, crimes committed by people of color, particularly those of Middle Eastern decent, are labeled as acts of terrorism - and yet, when the perpetrator is white, some news outlets are far more likely to drop the "terrorist" label and instead lament about what must have happened to turn the person down the path of destruction, replete with sad interviews and childhood portraits. It was painful to read these parts, because they are a sad reflection of what happens in every day life, and this was the part that, to me, felt most similar to THE HATE U GIVE because it forces the reader to confront uncomfortable truths.

    I really enjoyed LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS. It's so wonderful to see more #OwnVoices YA coming out - and so many of them are very good. This one is very good and I look forward to seeing what my friends make of it when it comes out next month.

    3.5 to 4 stars

  • Larry H

    "I guess I don't know how to live the life I want and still be a good daughter."

    Maya Aziz is a 17-year-old high school senior, the American-born daughter of Muslim Indians. Her mother expects her to be the perfectly obedient daughter, intelligent and demure, ready to head to college not far from her Illinois home and study medicine. Of course, that will do until her parents find the man she'll marry.

    Maya, however, has utterly different plans for her future. Ever since her father gave her a video

    "I guess I don't know how to live the life I want and still be a good daughter."

    Maya Aziz is a 17-year-old high school senior, the American-born daughter of Muslim Indians. Her mother expects her to be the perfectly obedient daughter, intelligent and demure, ready to head to college not far from her Illinois home and study medicine. Of course, that will do until her parents find the man she'll marry.

    Maya, however, has utterly different plans for her future. Ever since her father gave her a video camera when she was younger, she feels most comfortable observing life through a lens. She dreams of a filmmaking career, and secretly applied to NYU so she can study her craft. But how will her parents take the news that she's ready to move far away from home and live her own life?

    On the romantic front, Maya can't help but be intrigued by Kareem, a handsome college student and fellow film buff with whom her parents hope she'll make a match. He's everything her parents want for her, yet beyond being a suitable boy, he has a bit of an independent streak as well, and he clearly is attracted to Maya. So why is it that all she can really think about is Phil, a friend since childhood and the star quarterback of her high school football team, and one-half of the school's most popular couple?

    As Maya tries to navigate her life the best way she can, she learns that there is far more to Phil than meets the eye, but she can't let herself think about him romantically when he's dating someone else. Besides, his not being a Muslim would pretty much rule him out in her parents' eyes—if she ever had a chance with him anyway.

    When a terrorist attack happens in the state capitol, all of Maya's dreams are dashed. She once again realizes the prejudice she and her family and other Muslims face when something tragic happens. As violence and threats hit even closer to home, Maya wants to push past her fears and let her parents know that life—and her future—can't stop moving forward, but they are determined to protect her by clipping her wings. To what extent should she pursue her own path, and what will that mean for her relationship with her parents? And what about Phil?

    "I'm scared. I'm not just scared that somehow I'll be next; it's a quieter fear and more insidious. I'm scared of the next Muslim ban. I'm scared of my dad getting pulled into Secondary Security Screening at the airport for 'random' questioning. I'm scared some of the hijabi girls I know will get their scarves pulled off while they're walking down the sidewalk—or worse. I'm scared of being the object of fear and loathing and suspicion again. Always."

    is, in a lot of ways, two books in one. It's the story of an independent, creative girl determined to live life her own way, despite expectations and customs to the contrary, and it's a look at how all of her brashness is powerless in the face of love she doesn't feel entitled to. In that way, it feels like a typical YA book, and Samira Ahmed really lets you into Maya's heart and mind.

    At the same time, this is a book about the prejudice Muslims face in our country, especially since 9/11. It tells of the fears Muslims have when they hear of an incident, how they hope against hope the perpetrator wasn't a Muslim so it won't cause people to look differently or angrily at them, even though they have nothing to do with what happened. It's also a story about how hard it is to decide whether to give in to your fears, to let them control you, or to fight them head on.

    I really enjoyed this book, although at times it felt a little disjointed between the two storylines. But Ahmed created really engaging characters, many of whom transcended stereotypes, and she did throw a very unexpected twist in as well. I loved Maya and found Phil, Violet, Kareem, and Hina to be pretty fascinating. I wouldn't have minded if the book was longer, because I wanted more of their stories.

    definitely gives you something to think about, but it's not heavy-handed in its messaging. It's a worthwhile, enjoyable read, although it may skew a little younger than many recent YA books I've read.

    See all of my reviews at

    , or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at

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  • Warda

    When I initially heard about this book and the attention it was getting, I was excited. I mean, finally, we have books where a Muslim is our main character.

    I really did enjoy this book. I loved that Maya was adamant on pursuing her passion. I understood the suffocation she felt when it came to her parents, though they never mean her harm. As a 17 year old, you will not understand the irrational fear immigrant parents constantly feel. At that age, your concern aren’t your parents, it is yourself

    When I initially heard about this book and the attention it was getting, I was excited. I mean, finally, we have books where a Muslim is our main character.

    I really did enjoy this book. I loved that Maya was adamant on pursuing her passion. I understood the suffocation she felt when it came to her parents, though they never mean her harm. As a 17 year old, you will not understand the irrational fear immigrant parents constantly feel. At that age, your concern aren’t your parents, it is yourself.

    Now, I have to address the relationship since it played a major role. (Honestly, I rather have read more about Maya and her film documentaries.)

    The reality is that as a Muslim, dating/marrying a non-Muslim is just not happening. (We all know how our parents have raised us. Boys are just a no-no! 😅) Especially when you consider how much of our lives is influenced by our faith, though that didn’t necessarily play a role in Maya’s life.

    Another reality is that even though our faith teaches this, Muslims still do it.

    And there’s a lesson in this; in that being a Muslim and what Islam teaches are two different things. What people choose to do and what our faith commands, can be on two opposite sides of the spectrum, and regardless of whether this is right or wrong, it so happens to be a reality of our world.

    More books with Muslim characters should be released and I’m glad this is happening as our stories are vast and diverse in itself. Islamaphobia is real and rampant and as a Muslim, especially as a woman who wears a hijab, you automatically have a constant target on your back.

    So I appreciate books with Muslim main characters that shed light on different cultures and upbringing and showcase that our faith does play a significant role in our lives, irrespective of whether it is practised or not.

    Humans are humans at the end of the day.

    Overall, the story was quite weak to me, though enjoyable. There could’ve been so much more exploration with Maya and her dreams as well as her relationship with her family and friends that were touched upon but not expanded. For that reason, the story felt flimsy and not satisfying.

    ——————————-

    In need of a light read, because my brain feels fried.

    And I’m excited about the Muslim rep! Let’s see how Muzlamic this book is going to get! 😆

  • C.G. Drews

    I think it was a great balance because it full on tackles some heavy topics, plus it's an #ownvoices author and I think it's amazing and needed! My

    problem was honestly the romance...it just didn't work for me on any level lmao but remember I am basically an unfeeling bucket.

    I know this book is super important to a lot of people!! I'm really happy it exists!!

    I think it was a great balance because it full on tackles some heavy topics, plus it's an #ownvoices author and I think it's amazing and needed! My

    problem was honestly the romance...it just didn't work for me on any level lmao but remember I am basically an unfeeling bucket.

    I know this book is super important to a lot of people!! I'm really happy it exists!!

    On one hand she's really into filming and being independent and following her dreams (GO WOMAN) and references a ton of movies that I recognise about 0%. A lot of them were old?? I mean, I recognised Casablanca but only the title. I READ, OK??? ALL I DO IS READ. But Maya was also very rude to her parents. I get it. They were smothering her with old ideals and wanting her to be a traditional Good Indian Daughter and Get Married To a Sensible Man and Become A Doctor Or Lawyer ASAP. I get Maya's struggle, but I guess that it's just when they

    being super loving/caring of her, she was still always angry at them.

    I loved reading this and the writing really utilised the five senses and all the foodie scenes? NICE. I

    surprised that this book is pitched heavily as being about a

    Indian teen, but honestly Maya doesn't talk/act on her religion much.

    Ah hahhaa. I mean, it's just VERY romance focused so if you love that!! Then this!! is for you!! But I struggled with how much Maya's happiness depended on her boy(s) and I literally have no idea what she and Phil even had in common. But they had a cRUSH. And that is all that matters when you are 17. There's also a bit of a love-triangle for a while.

    Maya's life is massively threaten after a terrorist attack, with just the hate of white supremists. So even if the attack didn't

    touch her, it had a huge affect on her life and how she was treated, and that's definitely something that should be written about.

  • Heather 'Bookables'

    3.75

    We follow Maya who is an aspiring filmmaker who dreams of attending NYU fall short because her parents are afraid of her being away from home.

    Maya is a Indian American Muslim teen and loves her country. Then one day an attack happens in another state and the person responsible shares the last name as Maya, only it wasn't her family.

    This book touches on so many important subjects. On what it's like to be a Indian American Muslim teen living in a country that is full of people that hate her an

    3.75

    We follow Maya who is an aspiring filmmaker who dreams of attending NYU fall short because her parents are afraid of her being away from home.

    Maya is a Indian American Muslim teen and loves her country. Then one day an attack happens in another state and the person responsible shares the last name as Maya, only it wasn't her family.

    This book touches on so many important subjects. On what it's like to be a Indian American Muslim teen living in a country that is full of people that hate her and her religion. It touches on family life and the importance of family & so many more things.

    Overall I really enjoyed this book. Maya was a strong character and had strong beliefs and stood up for what was right. I loved reading about her dreams to become a filmmaker. There is also a super sweet romance in this book as well.

    Maya often feels like she doesn't belong in this book and it was amazing watching her progress throughout the book until the end when she felt like she finally was somewhere she was meant to be.

  • Lola

    I was anticipating this release. Islamophobia is so present in our society today that I find it important to have teen books with Muslim main characters that can give us their opinion on the issue and make us understand how they feel living in a world in which they are often seen as ‘‘other’’, ‘‘illegal’’ and even ‘‘terrorist’’.

    This is then a story that matters. Maya, the seventeen-year-old Muslim-American heroine of this book, matters. Her voice is strong and her feelings are true. She sheds l

    I was anticipating this release. Islamophobia is so present in our society today that I find it important to have teen books with Muslim main characters that can give us their opinion on the issue and make us understand how they feel living in a world in which they are often seen as ‘‘other’’, ‘‘illegal’’ and even ‘‘terrorist’’.

    This is then a story that matters. Maya, the seventeen-year-old Muslim-American heroine of this book, matters. Her voice is strong and her feelings are true. She sheds light where is needed and welcomes us, the reader, into her life with open arms. She is kind and patient, even when the world seems to be against her. She is important.

    Now I can praise the author for discussing Islamophobia in a non-aggressive and effective manner all day, but unfortunately, we must also discuss the romance since it takes a lot of space in the story. This is understandable, seeing that Maya is seventeen—and most of us were thinking about love at that age as well. However, her juggling two boys—going after a boy that already has a girlfriend, while leading another one on—turned me off.

    I can’t exactly blame Maya for letting herself fall in love with someone in a relationship, as she is young and the heart wants what it wants, but I was not charmed by the romance. Maya was, obviously, and I say good for her, but seeing her with the other boys really didn’t make me feel any particular way, except a tiny bit annoyed by the fact that she didn’t feel more remorseful about spending a considerate amount of time with a boy already in a relationship. The girl, who is in the dark about her boyfriend’s dates with Maya, deserves some respect, even if she’s not The One.

    Mixed thoughts, mixed emotions. Honest and relevant, but not without flaws.

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  • ilsa ➹

    IM PRETTY SURE YOU CAN HEAR MY SQUEALING ALL THE WAY OUT ON JUPITER for those who live there. Let's make this clear,

    And that's partly because there is actually

    and that's a problem!

    So when this sweet little book arrived from the publishers in the mail a few weeks ago I couldn't contain my excitement because 1) MY FIRST PHYSICAL

    IM PRETTY SURE YOU CAN HEAR MY SQUEALING ALL THE WAY OUT ON JUPITER for those who live there. Let's make this clear,

    And that's partly because there is actually

    and that's a problem!

    So when this sweet little book arrived from the publishers in the mail a few weeks ago I couldn't contain my excitement because 1) MY FIRST PHYSICAL ARC and 2) A MUSLIM MAIN CHARACTER. I REPEAT. A MUSLIM MAIN CHARACTER.

    And then from there, when I opened up this book, a lot of feelings came through. Some happy, and some gutted and some angry.

    On the one hand, Maya is honestly really sweet; she absolutely loves making movies and has this major crush on Phil, a guy in her class. And she's so rootable and likeable. I could connect with her over the course of the book, understanding her motives and sympathising with her a lot. She was real and very well developed!

    On the other hand,

    I mean the beginning, the insta love was making me sick. And the cute fluff. It's not the book, it's mostly me because I honestly can't stand cute texts and blushing. Not to mention, Maya is the queen of blushing. She's just crushing on Phil all the time and obsessing over him and it was

    Sorry. It was.

    Maya has an Indian background and while I am not Indian, a lot of the food mentioned like samosas and Tandoori Chicken were mouth-watering in a familiar way. YAS.

    I eat this food too. I want to eat this food right now. But I mean there's also a lot of cake sharing between Phil and Maya which warms my heart.

    And here comes the part WHERE I AM SO TORN. So we have Kareem and to me, that was total insta love. I did not ship it and I am glad Maya cut ties with him before anything really developed. And then we have Phil, who is Maya's all-time crush, and that is not insta love. It's developed and I admit, very fluffy.

    It was about the whole controversy of "Muslims girls dating". And In a contemporary with a Muslim MC, I was hoping this was going to be tackled in some way. But No. Maya just says "I know how to sneak out". But really?

    I mean sure she jokes about her parents are not okay with it. But she never feels one ounce of guilt or regret about Phil, concerning her parents and her religion.

    Also I was kinda uninvested in the romance. IT WAS SO FLUFFY. Me? Do I like fluff? HAHAHHA I HATE FLUFF. And while there were so many important serious issues discussed so much of it was ROMANCE and SQUISH at which I couldn't take it. Plus in the epilogue, SHE MENTIONS ANOTHER DUDE?!?!??! LIKE DUDE WHAT THE HECK. You develop a WHOLE romance with Phil and...ditch it? WTF?

    There was a lot of "culture" in this book but for me, religion is a struggle. There are ups and downs. But for Maya, there was none of that. She never mentions her beliefs in God like things like whether believes in Him or not.

    And this is an #ownvoices book so I'm not undermining anyone's experiences. But for me, religion plays a huge part in my life. I think about it.

    Look, everyone has their own relationships with their religion, and I'm not questioning that.

    That's because I never see Maya pray, or think of God, or think of the Qu'ran and struggle with her beliefs or do anything, to show she is a Muslim. And this is a hefty topic because belief is in the heart. But this was 1st person, i wanted to something to relate to. Anything. BUt really Maya only struggles with her Indian culture and not her religion.

    Where are those part fo her, those Muslim parts of her? I DONT SEE IT ANYWHERE.

    And i'm not expecting a perfect Muslim who prays 5 times a day but there was LITERALLY NOTHING to show she was Muslim. And for a Muslim reader, that's difficult.

    which is great but a massive seller of this to me was the Muslim representation.

    and Maya is dumbstruck. And he's just like "Yeah my parents know. NO BIGGIE" ANd see what I mean? Religion is totally discarded here. And then

    WHAT NO?? You are not allowed to eat pork, same with drinking Wine. One is not worse than the other. ANd the problem here is that if someone wanted to know whether Muslims were allowed to drink and read this book, they'd probably think the whole Wine being forbidden was a joke.

    She got a lot of hate from Brian which was horribly relatable. And people called her terrorist and things like that and again, shockingly familiar to me. It showed the horrors of hate crime and how "terrorism has no religion" as Maya's dad amazingly said.

    I want to freak tear something or punch something right now. Most of the book, we had an amazing portrayal of the parents but realistic as well. But there were parts that irked me.

    "You need to get married", "You need to find a sensible man". And I don't want people to see Muslim parents potrayed like that.

    And frick, that may be true in some cases.

    Like my mum cares ABOUT OTHER THINGS ABOUT ME. Like all Maya's mum cares about is if 1)Maya gets married and 2) if Maya seats properly. Now, the second one is relatable but the first?!!? Your mum should care about your hobbies, your interests not just if you are going to freaking get married. It annoyed me.

    I mean it sure was relatable when Maya's mum kept reminding Maya to "eat food" and when Maya says that you are "either too skinny or too chubby" BECAUSE YES I AM HERE WITH YOU MAYA. But

    I wanted Violet to have more of a part of the story but she was always there for Maya and she literally stood up for herself and Maya so many times. I love amazing female friendships like this

    is a pure sweet cinnamon roll and I love him. He had his own struggles and he suffered and he's literally the best romantic bean ever.And Kaleem? He backed off after a while and was such a great friend of Maya despite everything. THANK YOU.

    Hina is not married and she's a graphic designer and literally my favourite. OMG, WHY CAN WE NOT FOCUS ON HER MORE?! Please give me a whole book on Hina, thanks. She is marvellously great and breaks all stereotypes which are honestly so refreshing to see! AGH Hina supports Maya through

    and it honestly made me smile.

    +What I actually thought of the story?

    NOT COMPLETELY AND UTTERLy. It was an important story but in my ARC copy? It really wasn't something to marvel at. I had no idea what the terrorist POVs were talking about and they were so unnecessary and what the story itself is just filled with so much romance...I can't even anymore. I don't like romance books and that's literally what it was. I don't know I'm changing this because there's nothing memorable about this book, the characters aren't developed enough and while it's sweet and impacting it just didn't pack

    I just don't see why this is five stars for people? It really wasn't that good.

    I finished this in a matter of hours because the writing was quick so...that's something?

    See look, the Muslim struggles concerning society ARE THERE. But the actual belief and religions and teachings? ZILCH.

    Anyways, the Muslim rep is just me! Other Muslims may think it was great. I did not...really. Still a roller coaster of a book I guess

  • Fuzaila ~ is on hiatus

    - I see many of you chanced upon this book looking for a good Muslim rep. I did too. But this book was far from it. I have added some recommendations at the end of the review for those who are looking for good Muslim reps.

    ●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●

    Hear that faint shriek in the distance? Yeah, that’s probably me screaming over this book.

    When I saw this book on my feed –

    Indian. Teen. In.

    - I see many of you chanced upon this book looking for a good Muslim rep. I did too. But this book was far from it. I have added some recommendations at the end of the review for those who are looking for good Muslim reps.

    ●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●◇●

    Hear that faint shriek in the distance? Yeah, that’s probably me screaming over this book.

    When I saw this book on my feed –

    Indian. Teen. In. America. I NEED I NEED I NEED IT

    OMG. (Yeah, there’s seriously too less of them. WE NEED DIVERSE YA)

    See,

    I might not have seen America, but still, I knew I had to get this book and read it asap. Plus the reviews were all 5-starred! BONUS!

    Only, when you’re expecting to see yourself represented in a book, the book has a way of unduly disappointing you.

    If you don’t know the plot yet, Maya Aziz is a 17 year old living in Illinois with her immigrant, conservative parents. She loves making movies and intends to make a career out of it. She has a crush on a long-time classmate Phil. Her parents try to set her up with Kareem, a boy they deem suitable. Maya’s dreams of going to NYU for studies are crushed by the aftermath of a terrorist attack she has no role in.

    Seems stuffy, doesn’t it?

    Well, be disappointed because –

    You’d think that with a Muslim MC, romance might be the last thing to expect. But no,

    They go on dates, swimming lessons IN A BIKINI, kiss, hold hands and spend a night together. This is a forbidden relationship in Islam, and the only thing Maya is worried about is her parents grounding her?! She couldn’t even acknowledge the fact that what she is doing is

    in her morals?

    Does she pray ever? NO. Does she even say ‘I’m a Muslim’? NO. Does she ever say or do anything on her own that remotely signifies a Muslim? NO.

    I have no idea, why this book was branded as Muslim rep.

    I wonder if that’s the reason why everybody thinks this book is diverse.

    See, at the end of each chapter, there’s a small narrative in third person, about the terrorist guy Ethan. It is basically about how his Dad was abusive, how he was deeply affected by an unhappy childhood,

    I could not see a reason why that had to be included?

    At first I was lost on these narratives. Then I realized that Samira Ahmed is trying to give us the terrorists’ view of why he did what he did.

    .

    Basically,

    Which is utterly FALSE.

    And why I was disappointed with the rep was because

    I can see why someone who was born and bought up in America might not be fond of Indian culture which is far off to her. But that doesn’t mean you can’t embrace your difference. That doesn’t make you any more American than it makes you any less Indian.

    - It was very relatable though.

    - Parents bugging you to settle down.

    - Those tasty yummy home food.

    - The colorful Indian wedding.

    - Sorry, but it all gets drowned in the fluff of the romance.

    .

    I was so glad to see this bought up in this book.

    Maya wants to go to Film School in New York City, and her parents allow only after a lot of prodding. But after the terrorist attack, they prohibit her from going, and DISOWN her for deciding to go on her own. Yeah, that stuff still happens, yeah that sucks.

    .

    . She has no love for her parents; she was just rude to them. Yeah, I know, her parents weren’t all that supportive, but they loved her.

    My parents are conservative and oppressive, but still I don’t raise my voice at them. Not just because of respect, because they’re my PARENTS.

    On a forward note,

    Go for the fluff, the romance. I know this is an #OwnVoices book, and Samira Ahmed shares her story, but when you put a label on yourself, at least try to do it some justice. That’s all I’ve got to say.

    I loved this review by Ilsa, she catches on some points I didn't. Read it

    In no particular order

    ▪~

    - Dwelves somewhat onto the philosophical side, but does a good job of doing what it was meant to.

    ▪~

    - A lovely representation of Muslim teen in YA. Light contemporary, but does ponder over grave issues.

    ▪~

    - My favorite for some personal reasons. It is a cute contemporary romance, might feel clichèd for some people but I loved it nonetheless.

    ▪~

    - This book is actually a lot like LH&OF, but S.K. Ali did a much better job on the representation and religious front.

    ▪~

    - Centered around two twin teens striving to make the most of the holy month of Ramadhan. Gives you a lot better perspective than this book.

    If you want to read a brief fictious account of Islamic history, I'd say

    is the right book.

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