Love, Hate & Other Filters

Love, Hate & Other Filters

A searing #OwnVoices coming-of-age debut in which an Indian-American Muslim teen confronts Islamophobia and a reality she can neither explain nor escape--perfect for fans of Angie Thomas, Jacqueline Woodson, and Adam Silvera.American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending...

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Title:Love, Hate & Other Filters
Author:Samira Ahmed
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Love, Hate & Other Filters Reviews

  • kat ♡
  • ✨    jamieson   ✨

    2017 is the year for it, so many authors are killing this. LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS was one of my most highly anticipated releases of this year

    Love

    2017 is the year for it, so many authors are killing this. LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS was one of my most highly anticipated releases of this year

    Love, Hate & Other Filters follows Maya Aziz, an Indian/American muslim teen who dreams of going to film school and has a big ass crush on a boy at her school. It's mostly a coming of age novel, with cute romcom elements, but it's also a serious exploration of being a brown muslim girl in modern America and how people react to that. What I loved this book is it found such a perfect balance between fun and serious.

    For the

    . This book kind of reads like a romantic comedy. There's a love triangle (briefly, but it's killed off so don't worry if you hate them), there's funny banter and cute fluffy moments and lots of descriptions of incredible eyes and dimples and the usual ..

    . I really liked that, the romance made me happy, not uncomfortable which was NICE.

    And I think why the romance was so good was because the male characters were my favourite kind of male character. Aka, soft, sweet boys who care about feelings and are NICE. NICE BOYS. They are my favourite kind and I was so here for Phil, the love interest, and Kareem, a love interest/brother kinda figure to Maya.

    One more light aspect of this book I LOVED was that Maya had a hobby she was passionate about and wanted to take further. For some reason hobbies in YA are rare and I loved that Maya was pursuing her film passions so heavily. One downside of this was that the heavy use of film references was hard for me because I didn't understand most of them.

    . Islamophobia, racism, and current events such as terrorism and "the muslim ban" in America were all addressed, in a way that was eloquent and important and relevant.

    Maya, the main character, was an incredible character through whom most these discussions were facilitated. I think the author perfectly captured Maya as a character caught in a complex situation, and allowed her to express

    Love, Hate & Other Filters also explores the dynamic first generation Indian teens have with their parents and cultural challenges they face. I'm not a first generation teen or an immigrant so I can't comment on if this was well done, but I did find the exploration interesting to read and I definitely enjoyed reading that perspective. I recommend

    review on this aspect though, because she talks from a more informed standpoint about how she felt on the representation of Maya's parents.

    Want to slot in I think you should read

    and

    review of this book as they are ownvoices reviewers. This book is OwnVoices for the Indian/American & Muslim rep btw!

    Honestly, I highly recommend this book. I think a lot of people could really love it. It's doing what YA is great at right now - producing fun, relatable, cute content that also taps into the social political climate and makes a meaningful commentary. In this day and age I don't think you can afford to be tone deaf and this book perfectly finds a balance between serious and "non serious" issues. Ultimately, this book just looks at what it is like being someone like Maya in America - both the regular tv stuff we always see - crushes, school and friends, as well as the more serious, racist rhetoric that some teens have to endure everyday.

    I really loved this, and I woud of given it five stars if it weren't for the ending that I just .. didn't love.

    I haven't read When Dimple Met Rishi but I'm hearing from quite a few people if you think liked the representation in WDMR, but thought that Dimple was annoying and wanted something a little more serious, this is your perfect book!

    Overall I really hope this one gets more hype and that everyone reads it on Jan 16 when it comes out. It was incredibly cute and fun, whilst also being relevant and informed. Also, it's so short and packed such a massive punch. Love love love

  • Nina (Every Word A Doorway)

    . It is because of its comparison with the latter that I've decided to bump up the rating from 3.5 to 4 stars. The two books, both written by authors of Indian origin (one Hindu, one Muslim), cannot but be compared due to the way they are written and the themes they touch upon.

    . It is because of its comparison with the latter that I've decided to bump up the rating from 3.5 to 4 stars. The two books, both written by authors of Indian origin (one Hindu, one Muslim), cannot but be compared due to the way they are written and the themes they touch upon.

    I am not a Muslim and thus cannot judge this book from a point of authenticity. I review diverse books to my best knowledge and as a human being who

    . However, I suggest you also check for reviews by minority readers.

    Before discovering this debut on NetGalley, I had never even heard of this title. I cannot fathom why this title hasn't been talked about, considering how much Ahmed had her finger on the pulse of time with her debut. Though I had few expectations, I did hope that the author would make a strong statement.

    Let me be frank: I am

    of people generalizing the behaviour of individuals. I am tired of narrow-minded people projecting the actions of a handful onto billions. In my native tongue, we call this mindset "putting people in the same drawer", which means we categorise humans like objects – based on what they have in common. When radicalised individuals run vehicles into human crowds, people seem to instantly forget that killing innocents is a sin in Islamic doctrine, that a majority of Muslims lead peaceful lives, and that just as many condemn these actions as harshly as non-Muslims do.

    Last year, I was out with a Muslim friend of mine when a mosque was attacked nearby, and I realized that hate crimes weren't just "on the news", but right around the corner. We cannot tolerate this poison's spreading.

    Which is why I'm glad Samira Ahmed decided to write

    .

    Samira Ahmed uses a different term for prejudice, and that is "filter". She cleverly combines the main character's passion – film-making – with how vision works. Our vision, our judgement, can be clouded with strong emotions, be it love or hate or something else entirely. Maya Aziz lives a quiet life in the US, one of her biggest issues being badgered by her parents about law school, when she really wants to pursue film-making – and an unrequited crush. Until a terrorist attack renders her and her family a target of hatred.

    To be frank, I had expected the terrorist attack to occur sooner in the book, because I had read half the book before the turning point came. This allowed for more elaborate introduction of the characters and a development of the romance, which is positive in the sense that the hate Maya encounters is not what defines her, it is not how we get to know her. However, it also let the romance steer this car.

    Not only does Ahmed highlight racist reactions to the attack, but also Maya's immediate response of fear, which is one of the most eye-opening things you might ever read. Ahmed's words exquisitely capture the thoughts Maya, as a Muslim, develops because a handful of terrorists claim to believe in the same god she does.

    The rest of the story reads like your average YA romantic contemporary. To my own fascination, the book managed to take a romance I would've normally hated and turn it into something I liked. I also have to admit that, in spite of my complaints, the premise is very open and non-deceptive about its focus on romance. It begins with a love triangle, but quickly dissolves into a clear choice, with Maya making a healthy and respectful decision – role-model love triangle here, folks.

    But most importantly, I thought that

    was going to feature another sappy romance with a unicorns & rainbows ending, and I was surprised.

    She has, in a way, somewhat restored my faith in YA contemporary.

    The "Indian parents" theme encountered in

    is dominant in Ahmed's debut as well. As with everything, this daughter-parent relationship took on a more serious note than in the aforementioned book. Ahmed questions the line between a good daughter and an obedient one, between protective parents and overbearing ones.

    I also liked the important role of Maya's aunt Hina, and how this side character is instrumentalized to call attention to the courage it must take for an Indian woman to defy traditions and stereotypes.

    –––

    This book hasn't stirred a lot of a fuss yet, and I'm not sure why? The book's topic – prejudice, hatred, Islamophobia – is of utmost relevance right now. We use Insta filters voluntarily, but there are other filters, subtle and barely noticeable ones, clouding our judgement every day. I sincerely hope Samira Ahmed can deliver a powerful blow to prejudice with her debut novel.

  • Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

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    LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS seems to be being billed as the Muslim version of Angie Thomas's THE HATE U GIVE. Superficially, they have similar plots: both feature young women of color who, while firmly entrenched within their respective culture, struggle with balancing the "American" part of their heritage when faced with so many contradictions. Also in both books, the girls must reconcile their identities with a racially-geared tragedy,

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    LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS seems to be being billed as the Muslim version of Angie Thomas's THE HATE U GIVE. Superficially, they have similar plots: both feature young women of color who, while firmly entrenched within their respective culture, struggle with balancing the "American" part of their heritage when faced with so many contradictions. Also in both books, the girls must reconcile their identities with a racially-geared tragedy, and deal with the ensuing onslaught of hate and bigotry that ensues.

    The problem with this comparison is that THE HATE U GIVE is a much better book. It's raw, angry, passionate, and politically charged - daring in a way that LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS is not. That isn't to say that LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS is a bad book - it isn't - but it isn't as moving or as powerful as THE HATE U GIVE. To say it bluntly: I can easily see THE HATE U GIVE being taught in schools as a modern classic, like Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK, or Sandra Cisnero's THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET. I can't say the same for LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS.

    Setting such unfair comparisons aside, though, this is a very good book - and it's an #OwnVoices book to boot. The story is about seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz, a Muslim Indian born to immigrant parents who resides in Batavia, Illinois. She has dreams of dating and kissing boys, and wants to pursue her interest in photography and movies by studying film in New York. Her parents are very strict, however, and want her to stay closer to home, in a more traditional profession, like being a lawyer.

    Maya has friends, and has crushes on two very different boys over the course of the novel. She loves her parents, but also chafes at their more traditional outlook. It seems like it's going to be a typical coming-of-age story, as viewed through and Indian and a Muslim lens, but then tragedy strikes, and Maya and her family find themselves thrown into the spotlight when a building in Chicago is bombed by a terrorist, and one of the 'suspects' has the same last name as Maya and her family.

    There are many wonderful aspects to this book. I really enjoyed how central Maya's culture is to the book, and how much of a focus her burgeoning identity as not just a young woman but also an artist and a Musliam American-Indian plays in the story. There are the expected references to Bollywood and

    , but the book also covers tradition, dating, arranged marriage, education, family, love, and disappointment. The book also deals with bigotry and Islamophobia, and interwoven with Maya's narrative is that of the bomber himself.

    I honestly thought this latter portion was the most interesting, because of what wasn't said. It's very subtle, but if you watch the news, you'll pick up on it quickly. All too often, crimes committed by people of color, particularly those of Middle Eastern decent, are labeled as acts of terrorism - and yet, when the perpetrator is white, some news outlets are far more likely to drop the "terrorist" label and instead lament about what must have happened to turn the person down the path of destruction, replete with sad interviews and childhood portraits. It was painful to read these parts, because they are a sad reflection of what happens in every day life, and this was the part that, to me, felt most similar to THE HATE U GIVE because it forces the reader to confront uncomfortable truths.

    I really enjoyed LOVE, HATE & OTHER FILTERS. It's so wonderful to see more #OwnVoices YA coming out - and so many of them are very good. This one is very good and I look forward to seeing what my friends make of it when it comes out next month.

    3.5 to 4 stars

  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)

    This was the first book I started in 2018 that I wasn’t carrying over from 2017, and it was a great read to ease me into the year.

    is being marketed as a YA Contemporary about Islamophobia, and I was incredibly interested to dive into it considering I do not read many books about real-life issues and I have always wanted to rectify this.

    At it's core, LH&OF is a cha

    This was the first book I started in 2018 that I wasn’t carrying over from 2017, and it was a great read to ease me into the year.

    is being marketed as a YA Contemporary about Islamophobia, and I was incredibly interested to dive into it considering I do not read many books about real-life issues and I have always wanted to rectify this.

    At it's core, LH&OF is a charming, YA contemporary not only about what it means to be a teenager, but what it means to be an Indian-Muslim teenager in America. I personally found this book incredibly illuminating, and I'm so glad I read it. I also didn't find it difficult to understand at all; the challenges the protagonist faces are displayed in a very interactive, engaging way so that the message clearly comes across.

    Initially, LH&OF appears to be merely a YA contemporary romance, but then half-way through the narrative a terrorist attack occurs which dramatically changes Maya's life. At first I thought the event came a little late into the narrative, then I realised it very effectively portrayed how one's everyday life can be rocked by a sudden change that can come at any time and in any place. The narrative also flowed well and the book felt a suitable length despite it being on the shorter side.

    Maya was an enjoyable heroine and her passion for film was really sweet and well-built. I thought the desi culture was lovingly illustrated and it was incredibly enjoyable to read about a culture which has different traditions and familial bonds from my own.

  • Larry H

    "I guess I don't know how to live the life I want and still be a good daughter."

    Maya Aziz is a 17-year-old high school senior, the American-born daughter of Muslim Indians. Her mother expects her to be the perfectly obedient daughter, intelligent and demure, ready to head to college not far from her Illinois home and study medicine. Of course, that will do until her parents find the man she'll marry.

    Maya, however, has utterly different plans for her future. Ever since her father gave her a video

    "I guess I don't know how to live the life I want and still be a good daughter."

    Maya Aziz is a 17-year-old high school senior, the American-born daughter of Muslim Indians. Her mother expects her to be the perfectly obedient daughter, intelligent and demure, ready to head to college not far from her Illinois home and study medicine. Of course, that will do until her parents find the man she'll marry.

    Maya, however, has utterly different plans for her future. Ever since her father gave her a video camera when she was younger, she feels most comfortable observing life through a lens. She dreams of a filmmaking career, and secretly applied to NYU so she can study her craft. But how will her parents take the news that she's ready to move far away from home and live her own life?

    On the romantic front, Maya can't help but be intrigued by Kareem, a handsome college student and fellow film buff with whom her parents hope she'll make a match. He's everything her parents want for her, yet beyond being a suitable boy, he has a bit of an independent streak as well, and he clearly is attracted to Maya. So why is it that all she can really think about is Phil, a friend since childhood and the star quarterback of her high school football team, and one-half of the school's most popular couple?

    As Maya tries to navigate her life the best way she can, she learns that there is far more to Phil than meets the eye, but she can't let herself think about him romantically when he's dating someone else. Besides, his not being a Muslim would pretty much rule him out in her parents' eyes—if she ever had a chance with him anyway.

    When a terrorist attack happens in the state capitol, all of Maya's dreams are dashed. She once again realizes the prejudice she and her family and other Muslims face when something tragic happens. As violence and threats hit even closer to home, Maya wants to push past her fears and let her parents know that life—and her future—can't stop moving forward, but they are determined to protect her by clipping her wings. To what extent should she pursue her own path, and what will that mean for her relationship with her parents? And what about Phil?

    "I'm scared. I'm not just scared that somehow I'll be next; it's a quieter fear and more insidious. I'm scared of the next Muslim ban. I'm scared of my dad getting pulled into Secondary Security Screening at the airport for 'random' questioning. I'm scared some of the hijabi girls I know will get their scarves pulled off while they're walking down the sidewalk—or worse. I'm scared of being the object of fear and loathing and suspicion again. Always."

    is, in a lot of ways, two books in one. It's the story of an independent, creative girl determined to live life her own way, despite expectations and customs to the contrary, and it's a look at how all of her brashness is powerless in the face of love she doesn't feel entitled to. In that way, it feels like a typical YA book, and Samira Ahmed really lets you into Maya's heart and mind.

    At the same time, this is a book about the prejudice Muslims face in our country, especially since 9/11. It tells of the fears Muslims have when they hear of an incident, how they hope against hope the perpetrator wasn't a Muslim so it won't cause people to look differently or angrily at them, even though they have nothing to do with what happened. It's also a story about how hard it is to decide whether to give in to your fears, to let them control you, or to fight them head on.

    I really enjoyed this book, although at times it felt a little disjointed between the two storylines. But Ahmed created really engaging characters, many of whom transcended stereotypes, and she did throw a very unexpected twist in as well. I loved Maya and found Phil, Violet, Kareem, and Hina to be pretty fascinating. I wouldn't have minded if the book was longer, because I wanted more of their stories.

    definitely gives you something to think about, but it's not heavy-handed in its messaging. It's a worthwhile, enjoyable read, although it may skew a little younger than many recent YA books I've read.

    See all of my reviews at

    , or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at

    .

  • Cait (Paper Fury)

    I think it was a great balance because it full on tackles some heavy topics, plus it's an #ownvoices author and I think it's amazing and needed! My

    problem was honestly the romance...it just didn't work for me on any level lmao but remember I am basically an unfeeling bucket.

    I know this book is super important to a lot of people!! I'm really happy it exists!!

    I think it was a great balance because it full on tackles some heavy topics, plus it's an #ownvoices author and I think it's amazing and needed! My

    problem was honestly the romance...it just didn't work for me on any level lmao but remember I am basically an unfeeling bucket.

    I know this book is super important to a lot of people!! I'm really happy it exists!!

    On one hand she's really into filming and being independent and following her dreams (GO WOMAN) and references a ton of movies that I recognise about 0%. A lot of them were old?? I mean, I recognised Casablanca but only the title. I READ, OK??? ALL I DO IS READ.

    I get it. They were smothering her with old ideals and wanting her to be a traditional Good Indian Daughter and Get Married To a Sensible Man and Become A Doctor Or Lawyer ASAP. But I felt they ended up turning into an antagonist narrative. Which is sad. :( :( :( Anyway it reminded me a lot of

    where the parents are basically always oppressive.

    Anyway I DON'T want to erase that it happens. But I just couldn't connect it with how loving her parents were (they were so happy and proud of her and they weren't abusive and they wanted her to be safe) with how much she seemed to loathe them.

    I loved reading this and the writing really utilised the five senses and all the foodie scenes? NICE. I

    surprised that this book is pitched heavily as being about a

    Indian teen, but honestly Maya doesn't talk/act on her religion at all.

    Ah hahhaa. I mean, it's just VERY romance focused so if you love that!! Then this!! is for you!! But I struggled with how much Maya's happiness depended on her boy(s) and I literally have no idea what she and Phil even had in common. But they had a cRUSH. And that is all that matters when you are 17. There's also a bit of a love-triangle for a while.

    Maya's life is massively threaten after a terrorist attack, with just the hate of white supremists. So even if the attack didn't

    touch her, it had a huge affect on her life and how she was treated, and that's definitely something that should be written about.

  • Heather 'Bookables'

    3.75

    We follow Maya who is an aspiring filmmaker who dreams of attending NYU fall short because her parents are afraid of her being away from home.

    Maya is a Indian American Muslim teen and loves her country. Then one day an attack happens in another state and the person responsible shares the last name as Maya, only it wasn't her family.

    This book touches on so many important subjects. On what it's like to be a Indian American Muslim teen living in a country that is full of people that hate her an

    3.75

    We follow Maya who is an aspiring filmmaker who dreams of attending NYU fall short because her parents are afraid of her being away from home.

    Maya is a Indian American Muslim teen and loves her country. Then one day an attack happens in another state and the person responsible shares the last name as Maya, only it wasn't her family.

    This book touches on so many important subjects. On what it's like to be a Indian American Muslim teen living in a country that is full of people that hate her and her religion. It touches on family life and the importance of family & so many more things.

    Overall I really enjoyed this book. Maya was a strong character and had strong beliefs and stood up for what was right. I loved reading about her dreams to become a filmmaker. There is also a super sweet romance in this book as well.

    Maya often feels like she doesn't belong in this book and it was amazing watching her progress throughout the book until the end when she felt like she finally was somewhere she was meant to be.

  • ilsa ➹

    IM PRETTY SURE YOU CAN HEAR MY SQUEALING ALL THE WAY OUT ON JUPITER for those who live there. Let's make this clear,

    And that's partly because there is actually

    and that's a problem!

    So when this sweet little book arrived from the publishers in the mail a few weeks ago I couldn't contain my excitement because 1) MY FIRST PHYSICAL

    IM PRETTY SURE YOU CAN HEAR MY SQUEALING ALL THE WAY OUT ON JUPITER for those who live there. Let's make this clear,

    And that's partly because there is actually

    and that's a problem!

    So when this sweet little book arrived from the publishers in the mail a few weeks ago I couldn't contain my excitement because 1) MY FIRST PHYSICAL ARC and 2) A MUSLIM MAIN CHARACTER. I REPEAT. A MUSLIM MAIN CHARACTER.

    And then from there, when I opened up this book, a lot of feelings came through. Some happy, and some gutted and some angry.

    On the one hand, Maya is honestly really sweet; she absolutely loves making movies and has this major crush on Phil, a guy in her class. And she's so rootable and likeable. I could connect with her over the course of the book, understanding her motives and sympathising with her a lot. She was real and very well developed!

    On the other hand,

    I mean the beginning, the insta love was making me sick. And the cute fluff. It's not the book, it's mostly me because I honestly can't stand cute texts and blushing. Not to mention, Maya is the queen of blushing. She's just crushing on Phil all the time and obsessing over him and it was

    Sorry. It was.

    Maya has an Indian background and while I am not Indian, a lot of the food mentioned like samosas and Tandoori Chicken were mouth-watering in a familiar way. YAS.

    I eat this food too. I want to eat this food right now. But I mean there's also a lot of cake sharing between Phil and Maya which warms my heart.

    And here comes the part WHERE I AM SO TORN. So we have Kareem and to me, that was total insta love. I did not ship it and I am glad Maya cut ties with him before anything really developed. And then we have Phil, who is Maya's all-time crush, and that is not insta love. It's developed and I admit, very fluffy.

    It was about the whole controversy of "Muslims girls dating". And In a contemporary with a Muslim MC, I was hoping this was going to be tackled in some way. But No. Maya just says "I know how to sneak out". But really?

    I mean sure she jokes about her parents are not okay with it. But she never feels one ounce of guilt or regret about Phil, concerning her parents and her religion.

    Also I was kinda uninvested in the romance. IT WAS SO FLUFFY. Me? Do I like fluff? HAHAHHA I HATE FLUFF. And while there were so many important serious issues discussed so much of it was ROMANCE and SQUISH at which I couldn't take it. Plus in the epilogue, SHE MENTIONS ANOTHER DUDE?!?!??! LIKE DUDE WHAT THE HECK. You develop a WHOLE romance with Phil and...ditch it? WTF?

    There was a lot of "culture" in this book but for me, religion is a struggle. There are ups and downs. But for Maya, there was none of that. She never mentions her beliefs in God like things like whether believes in Him or not.

    And this is an #ownvoices book so I'm not undermining anyone's experiences. But for me, religion plays a huge part in my life. I think about it.

    Look, everyone has their own relationships with their religion, and I'm not questioning that.

    That's because I never see Maya pray, or think of God, or think of the Qu'ran and struggle with her beliefs or do anything, to show she is a Muslim. And this is a hefty topic because belief is in the heart. But this was 1st person, i wanted to something to relate to. Anything. BUt really Maya only struggles with her Indian culture and not her religion.

    Where are those part fo her, those Muslim parts of her? I DONT SEE IT ANYWHERE.

    And i'm not expecting a perfect Muslim who prays 5 times a day but there was LITERALLY NOTHING to show she was Muslim. And for a Muslim reader, that's difficult.

    which is great but a massive seller of this to me was the Muslim representation.

    and Maya is dumbstruck. And he's just like "Yeah my parents know. NO BIGGIE" ANd see what I mean? Religion is totally discarded here. And then

    WHAT NO?? You are not allowed to eat pork, same with drinking Wine. One is not worse than the other. ANd the problem here is that if someone wanted to know whether Muslims were allowed to drink and read this book, they'd probably think the whole Wine being forbidden was a joke.

    She got a lot of hate from Brian which was horribly relatable. And people called her terrorist and things like that and again, shockingly familiar to me. It showed the horrors of hate crime and how "terrorism has no religion" as Maya's dad amazingly said.

    I want to freak tear something or punch something right now. Most of the book, we had an amazing portrayal of the parents but realistic as well. But there were parts that irked me.

    "You need to get married", "You need to find a sensible man". And I don't want people to see Muslim parents like that. Maybe that's Indian parents (i don't know) because that's literally what everyone thinks.

    And frick, that may be true in some cases.

    Like my mum cares ABOUT OTHER THINGS ABOUT ME. Like all Maya's mum cares about is if 1)Maya gets married and 2) if Maya seats properly. Now, the second one is relatable but the first?!!? Your mum should care about your hobbies, your interests not just if you are going to freaking get married. It annoyed me.

    I mean it sure was relatable when Maya's mum kept reminding Maya to "eat food" and when Maya says that you are "either too skinny or too chubby" BECAUSE YES I AM HERE WITH YOU MAYA. But

    I wanted Violet to have more of a part of the story but she was always there for Maya and she literally stood up for herself and Maya so many times. I love amazing female friendships like this

    is a pure sweet cinnamon roll and I love him. He had his own struggles and he suffered and he's literally the best romantic bean ever.And Kaleem? He backed off after a while and was such a great friend of Maya despite everything. THANK YOU.

    Hina is not married and she's a graphic designer and literally my favourite. OMG, WHY CAN WE NOT FOCUS ON HER MORE?! Please give me a whole book on Hina, thanks. She is marvellously great and breaks all stereotypes which are honestly so refreshing to see! AGH Hina supports Maya through

    and it honestly made me smile.

    +What I actually thought of the story?

    NOT COMPLETELY AND UTTERLy. It was an important story but in my ARC copy? It really wasn't something to marvel at. I had no idea what the terrorist POVs were talking about and they were so unnecessary and what the story itself is just filled with so much romance...I can't even anymore. I don't like romance books and that's literally what it was. I don't know I'm changing this because there's nothing memorable about this book, the characters aren't developed enough and while it's sweet and impacting it just didn't pack

    I just don't see why this is five stars for people? It really wasn't that good.

    I finished this in a matter of hours because the writing was quick so...that's something?

    See look, the Muslim struggles concerning society ARE THERE. But the actual belief and religions and teachings? ZILCH.

    Anyways, the Muslim rep is just me! Other Muslims may think it was great. I did not...really. Still a roller coaster of a book I guess

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