Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick

Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick

In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how gender bias infects every level of medicine and healthcare today—leading to inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment that threatens women’s lives and well-being.Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and soci...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick
Author:Maya Dusenbery
Rating:

Doing Harm: The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick Reviews

  • Melissa

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women’s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Dusenbery gets into the actual published science behind all the bad science/medicine and how the tides are slowly beginning to turn.

    Book 2 of the three-Book trifecta coming out 3/6 about women’s health and chronic ill

    A deep dive into decades-long practices in science and medicine that disadvantage women from the word go. Bad science, prejudicial and paternalistic attitudes by physicians and other care providers, and a persistent belief that women’s self-reported symptoms are not to be trusted. Dusenbery gets into the actual published science behind all the bad science/medicine and how the tides are slowly beginning to turn.

    Book 2 of the three-Book trifecta coming out 3/6 about women’s health and chronic illness (other two titles are Invisible and Ask Me About My Uterus).

  • Shaina Robbins

    Would it be inappropriate for me to give a copy of this to every medical professional I meet? Or maybe just to a couple of terrible of doctors from my past?

  • Wendy

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously."

    If you are a woman, have a body and go to the doctor, read this book. You will recognise your experience in these pages. You will get enraged. And you will be joined by many other women.

    As a sufferer of CFS, I faced years of doctors telling me I was sufferi

    "Women's symptoms are not taken seriously because medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems. And medicine doesn't know as much about their bodies and health problems because it doesn't take their symptoms seriously."

    If you are a woman, have a body and go to the doctor, read this book. You will recognise your experience in these pages. You will get enraged. And you will be joined by many other women.

    As a sufferer of CFS, I faced years of doctors telling me I was suffering from stress and just needed to meditate, take it easy. The suspicion that it was "all in my head" never far away. My daughter with PCOS as a teenager was laughingly called a "hypochondriac " by our ex-doctor because she was missing her periods.

    This book meticulously details the gaps in medical treatment for women. Primarily the gaps are in two areas:

    Knowledge about women's bodies, issues, complexities and Trust in women's accounts of their symptoms. "Hysteria" and "psychosomatic" part of the regular lexicon.

    This book details a situation in women's health that is beyond alarming; one that leaves women suffering for years with no support or diagnosis. The rule of thumb is: "If we don't know what is causing your chronic pain, it must be all in your head, not a deficit in our knowledge."

    Well written. Infuriating. Empowering. Recommended.

  • Mickey

    I want to take this book to my next doctor's appointment, smack him upside the head with it, and then stand there and read the whole damn thing out loud to him! It was infuriating and maddening to read, but it helped me to feel better that I'm not the only woman who is fighting the medical system for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

  • Zia Okocha

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment systems. Until this book, however, I did not notice how sexist the medical system is as well. As the author notes, so many medical conditions that cause knee-jerk negative reactions are experienced mostly by women. She a

    This book is must read for all women, doctors who care for women, and anyone with girls and women in their lives (so, yes everyone). As a female physician of color, I know I have come to have antennas up for inherent systemic racism built into our medical education and treatment systems. Until this book, however, I did not notice how sexist the medical system is as well. As the author notes, so many medical conditions that cause knee-jerk negative reactions are experienced mostly by women. She also takes us through the history of a number of medical conditions that until recently have not had biological or "organic" explanations and have largely been considered "psychogenic", completely made up, or part of the the normal crappy experience of being a woman (see endometriosis or dysmenorrhea).

    She also notes the lack of funding for many female-predominant conditions, and likely most shocking the fact that most of medical research is based on men, male animals and male cell lines. We are not taught about differences between males and females in medical school other than the reproductive health system and when we have our OB/Gyn and urology rotations. It wasn't until residency that I learned about how medications are metabolized differently by men and women. So, I shudder to think about how many conditions we fail to optimize by not evaluating outcomes in women.

    Because of this book, I know I will make more of a conscious effort to check myself when dealing with female patients, knowing that I live in a society and was educated in a system that instills bias against believing women or their symptoms. Moreover, I am interested in using this knowledge to help push for more research including women (especially pregnant women) and evaluating more closely studies that I read for outcomes separated by sex.

    So thankful for this book and I hope more folks read this and feel empowered to demand more from their physicians and the medical system.

  • Alex Linschoten

    Important and timely. Dusenbery has hit the nail on the head with this book. I highlighted so many passages. She reveals how -- at almost every turn -- women are rendered dismissed, ignored and invisible by the medical system.

  • Alyssa Foll

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and for the healthcare they deserved.

    I can't say that this is a "pop" science read-- there was an impressive amount of data, acronyms, and medical jargon. However, it is well worth the read to explore how women in pain

    This was an eye-opening read about how poorly women are treated in the medical system. Maya Dusenbery examines multiple factors for why medicine tends to be sexist and paternalistic in its care of women, but she also shares countless stories of women who advocated for themselves and for the healthcare they deserved.

    I can't say that this is a "pop" science read-- there was an impressive amount of data, acronyms, and medical jargon. However, it is well worth the read to explore how women in pain are treated by our medical system in the US. My hope is that this book will serve as a clarion call for better healthcare and better treatment for all women.

  • ❤

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the same way. Because of that, I also didn't find the writing to be entirely engaging as I expected such a topic to be for me. In fact, it was rather dry. In this case, that doesn't mean I didn't like the book - I though

    I hate to say it, but I found this book pretty repetitive in a lot of spots. Each section, regardless of what part of history or which medical issue was being discussed, felt like I was re-reading entire paragraphs at some point because so much was constantly being reiterated in the same way. Because of that, I also didn't find the writing to be entirely engaging as I expected such a topic to be for me. In fact, it was rather dry. In this case, that doesn't mean I didn't like the book - I thought it was informative and succeeded at tying history into present day medicine for the most part, I just thought it could do with a bit more editing in certain areas.

    That said, I've rounded my rating up to 3 from 2.5 stars simply because this topic is so, so important and regardless of writing style, the more effort that's put into bringing women's health and how often our symptoms are overlooked, downplayed or straight up misdiagnosed (and why historically this has been so prevalent) to the forefront, the better.

    Luckily, there are a couple more books on this very topic that have or will be coming out this year that can/will help Doing Harm in the fight to bring awareness and share the stories of some of the women who have struggled directly with sexist medicine.

  • Julie Barrett

    I learned a lot of infuriating information from this book that will hopefully improve future interactions I have with doctors. I wish, though, that the information had been presented better. It was quite a slog, getting through this book. Lots and lots of facts, many repetitive and written in a dry, dull style. Reading non fiction books like these make me appreciate it when I do come across a piece of non fiction that is well written.

    What did this book teach me? A lot. There are two overriding p

    I learned a lot of infuriating information from this book that will hopefully improve future interactions I have with doctors. I wish, though, that the information had been presented better. It was quite a slog, getting through this book. Lots and lots of facts, many repetitive and written in a dry, dull style. Reading non fiction books like these make me appreciate it when I do come across a piece of non fiction that is well written.

    What did this book teach me? A lot. There are two overriding problems facing women today when it comes to health care. The knowledge gap - there is dramatically less research and information about women's health - and the trust gap - basically that it's all in our heads when women get sick. There is a strong unconscious bias embedded in the medical community that I hope will lessen with time as more women become doctors & medical researchers.

    Women's health is often conflated with reproductive health. That is a part of it, our reproductive system, but for many in the health field the terms are synonymous. It's known as the bikini health approach to women's healthcare. Only body parts covered by a bikini are focused on.

    Fun facts in this book:

    Of the FDA approved drugs pulled between 1997-2001 because of health risks, 80% of them were pulled off the shelves because it turned out they were more dangerous for women.

    There are no laws forcing either private companies or government funded studies to include women in trial studies or research. And most do not for two reasons that are diametrically opposed. One: it's because the sexes are totally alike - other than our reproductive systems - so there is no point in including women. We can just extrapolate the findings to women. Strangely, if that is the case, there are never any instances when only women are studied and the findings extrapolated to men. Hmmm. The opposite argument is that women aren't included because they are soooo different. Including women would "confuse" the test results and introduce too much "noise" so it's harder to get "clean" results. Also, the most important reason of all, it would increase the cost of research.

    Women are 75% more likely to have a negative drug reaction because - surprise - there are no studies to see if and how a woman might react to a drug. It's just extrapolated from studies of men's reactions.

    More than half of all American women have at least one chronic health condition.

    Women delay seeking care more than men do but that is not the commonly held perception in the medical field.

    Women who seek care tend to fall under two categories. Either they are neurotic attention seekers - this is when the women is middle/upper class and white or Asian - or they are malingering drug seekers out to scam the system & get drugs & disability check. Obviously the latter are black & hispanic women & working class/poor. Rarely is the woman seen who does not fall under one of these two types.

    I learned that you should always bring a man with you to a doctor appointment when you are trying to get a diagnosis. Especially at the emergency room. Staff will believe the man if he says what your symptoms are.

    Doctors think men have heart attacks and women have stress.

    My favorite quote from a 1971 medical textbook - "Many women exaggerate the severity of their complaints to gratify neurotic desires." Seriously, that was what was taught.

    There are 50 million Americans with autoimmune disorders. 28 million with hear disease. 21 million with cancer. Then why are autoimmune disorders not funded better? 75% of people with autoimmune disorders are women. And you know how neurotic and whiny women are. They are probably exaggerating those symptoms.

    If you wear makeup & are traditionally attractive then doctors will see your pain as being less. Why you are too pretty to feel bad!

    If you are fat, then it is because of your weight that you are having problems. Many doctors won't even look for a cause and just automatically assume it's because of weight.

    If you are young and seeking help for unexplained symptoms, doctors will jump to the conclusion that you are partying too much, or maybe you have an eating disorder.

    Honestly, this was quite a depressing litany of facts throughout the book. I am glad I now know these things but it certainly wasn't a book I was rushing to pick up and finish. Took a long time to read.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.