Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast

Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast

From the creators of the #1 podcast Limetown, an explosive prequel about a teenager who learns of a mysterious research facility where over three hundred people have disappeared—including her uncle—with clues that become the key to discovering the secrets of this strange town.On a seemingly ordinary day, seventeen-year-old Lia Haddock hears news that will change her life f...

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Title:Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast
Author:Cote Smith
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Limetown: The Prequel to the #1 Podcast Reviews

  • Mariah

    APR Investigative Journalist Lia Haddock delves into the mystery of what happened to the entire population of Limetown that disappeared without a clue.

    Season 1 was sooooo good! I hope there is a second season.

  • Erikka

    I absolutely adore the Limetown podcast. In fact, after reading this, I'm going to give it a second listen, something I never do with podcasts. I jumped at the chance to read this prequel novel, told in alternating POVs of Lia and her uncle, Emile. I was enthralled with the plot and how it all set up the podcast so beautifully without really giving anything away. Some of the major reveals were actually helpful in connecting dots in the audio narrative. I think everyone would love this podcast, e

    I absolutely adore the Limetown podcast. In fact, after reading this, I'm going to give it a second listen, something I never do with podcasts. I jumped at the chance to read this prequel novel, told in alternating POVs of Lia and her uncle, Emile. I was enthralled with the plot and how it all set up the podcast so beautifully without really giving anything away. Some of the major reveals were actually helpful in connecting dots in the audio narrative. I think everyone would love this podcast, even people who don't traditionally like the medium. It is absolutely engrossing and leaves you itching for the next season. I did take one star off, however, because I truly liked the audio format much better. The podcast is like a puzzle you slowly piece together, whereas a novel just tells you the plot. I much prefer the puzzle. I wish some parts of the novel had been left to the imagination like in the podcast.

  • Meghan

    I received a copy of an uncorrected proof at NYCC this year - thank you to Simon and Schuster for the opportunity to read this book!

    Overall, I enjoyed this book. The first few chapters had me a bit concerned - I don't know why I didn't expect the alternating narratives, and both Lia and Emile's high school days were a bit slow to get through. That being said, around 100 pages, this book really got interesting. I definitely preferred Emile's story, and kind of wish it had just been Emile for the

    I received a copy of an uncorrected proof at NYCC this year - thank you to Simon and Schuster for the opportunity to read this book!

    Overall, I enjoyed this book. The first few chapters had me a bit concerned - I don't know why I didn't expect the alternating narratives, and both Lia and Emile's high school days were a bit slow to get through. That being said, around 100 pages, this book really got interesting. I definitely preferred Emile's story, and kind of wish it had just been Emile for the most part - the Lia in the book didn't line up with the Lia in the podcast so much. She felt too cold and distant?

    I haven't gone back through Limetown since I finished the book (I did it before starting, but I'll be binging it again tomorrow) to see how the entire book colors the listening, but I know it will. There are characters mentioned in the show that definitely appear in the book, as well as understanding how we actually got to Limetown.

    I will be curious to pick up a copy of the finished book to see if it's cleaner. Some of my biggest problems with the book do lie with the inconsistencies of it maybe being an uncorrected proof. For instance one character - Robyn- changes pronouns three times. And not in a "this is part of the character" way, but more in a "we hadn't quite figured out what gender we want to make this character" kind of way (because really, the character is minor.) The ending is also a bit weird - as in the last three or four pages - because it switches to second person, almost within a sentence. I had to read it twice to understand what exactly was happening, and it was incredibly rushed. Honestly, if the ending of the book doesn't show back up in the podcast given how rushed it was, I will be a bit disappointed.

    I'm wavering between 3.5 and 4 stars, but overall, if you are a fan of the podcast, check out the book. If you haven't listened to the podcast....I'm not 100% sure the book stands on its own as interesting, but it is a good place to start!

  • Diane Hernandez

    Fans of the Limetown podcast rejoice! Many of your lingering questions are answered within these pages. Plus there are no spoilers for future podcasts.

    Lia wants to be a reporter. Her first investigation is of the missing residents of nearby Limetown. She discovers that her Uncle Emile is somehow involved, which makes it personal. Her father and uncle’s origin stories are told in flashbacks. What type of experiments were done at Limetown? Who were the people behind the experiments? What were thei

    Fans of the Limetown podcast rejoice! Many of your lingering questions are answered within these pages. Plus there are no spoilers for future podcasts.

    Lia wants to be a reporter. Her first investigation is of the missing residents of nearby Limetown. She discovers that her Uncle Emile is somehow involved, which makes it personal. Her father and uncle’s origin stories are told in flashbacks. What type of experiments were done at Limetown? Who were the people behind the experiments? What were their motivations? Why was Lia’s family so intimately involved?

    I had heard of the Limetown podcast but hadn’t listened to any episodes before acquiring this book. I had only read about 20% when I decided I couldn’t wait any longer and binge listened to season 1. The podcast is formatted as interviews with survivors of the Limetown disaster. This book starts before Lia is a reporter or Emile has joined the Limetown project. By looking back, the podcast is inherently more mysterious and shocking than the book that is more linear. However, they complement each other well regardless of the order they are imbibed.

    If you like mysteries with a creepy scientific setting, both the Limetown book and podcast are highly recommended. 4 stars! If you are already a podcast fan, you have to read this book!

    Thanks to the publisher, Simon & Schuster, and NetGalley for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  • Anna Denney

    Unrealistic, however I was still compelled to finish it

  • Matina

    I am a podcast fan, and a fan of fiction, so it should come as no surprise that the moment I got access to Limetown’s prequel novel also titled Limetown I dug right in. Because it is a novel connected to a podcast I’ve chosen to break this into two parts: a book review, and a review of how they connect.

    I’m going to warn potential readers and listeners that the book does spoil major portions of the podcast. I've attempted to keep my review as spoiler free (for the book) as possible.

    The book

    Limet

    I am a podcast fan, and a fan of fiction, so it should come as no surprise that the moment I got access to Limetown’s prequel novel also titled Limetown I dug right in. Because it is a novel connected to a podcast I’ve chosen to break this into two parts: a book review, and a review of how they connect.

    I’m going to warn potential readers and listeners that the book does spoil major portions of the podcast. I've attempted to keep my review as spoiler free (for the book) as possible.

    The book

    Limetown is broken into two stories that alternate between chapters. Those stories are that of Lia, and her uncle Emile. Lia is a 17-year-old budding journalist who is searching for answers about her family and their possible connection to Limetown. Emile’s story starts 25 years before the panic at Limetown and revolves around his search for his family, and freedom.

    I found Emile’s story the more interesting of the two, he is different, special, and desperate. These were all factors that drove me to keep turning the pages of his story to see what kind of ending he got, did he find happiness? Did he find love? Did he find a place to belong? How would all that change to drive the next part of the story forward?

    Lia’s story was less engaging. The writing feels distant and worked so that her story lines up with the events in Emile’s life we gradually learn about. It is very structured to show us the after to Emile’s before. Much of the resolution to her story feels contrived and put together in an unbelievable way.

    As for the overall story, Limetown has a way of tying its characters together. It is not subtle about letting readers know just how parallel things are, and unfortunately this takes some of the surprise away from later ‘big reveals’. After one I actually put the book down and rolled my eyes. It relies on this again, at the end as the explanation for why many things happen. This makes the ending feel flat and unsatisfactory to a fan of the podcast searching for connecting threads.

    Limetown suffers from a problem that a lot of prequels deal with: It must tell its own story and feel special but also tie it into later narration. Because of this Emile’s story is very condensed, with huge time jumps and not enough breathing room, (which is surprising when you consider the fact that the book is 304 pages long), and Lia’s feels like filler that gets more and more confusing and coincidental as it goes.

    I would have liked this book more if it had been two books. Lia’s and Emile’s. If we were given more time to get to know the characters and walk with them as they grew and changed Lia might feel more approachable and Emile’s story could have been further expanded. As it stands it feels like we get highlights from their lives, leaving us little time to process major events or reveals.

    It doesn’t help that the writing often feels choppy itself. Lia’s chapters tend to have short sentences and odd tense choices. It can be said that this style was chosen specifically to emulate Lia’s distance or Emile’s oddness but it doesn’t hit home. I will add that the reading does get smoother as you progress through the book, but I can’t say if that was my brain accepting the style of writing or an actual improvement.

    The book and podcast together

    I did a re-listen of the podcast as soon as I finished the book in order to see just how connected the two are and determine how much a fan of the podcast might get out of the book.

    It was a rollercoaster of emotions as I listened to the podcast again, because this time my brain was trying its very best to connect all the new pieces I had to the old ones. There wasn’t a lot to put together with Emile, but his portion of the novel did actually make my listening experience better. I felt like I knew a lot of the characters better and knew his motivations deeper.

    Lia is where the trouble seems to be. For the sake of not spoiling anything I’m not going to name certain events in the book, but Lia knows much more than she lets on in the podcast. In the book she meets people who show up in it and she does things that I think should have at least been mentioned in the podcast. Her introductory episode could have easily been structured to have her mention these things, but it does not.

    This leads me to believe that the prequel was not planned. This book was not a part of the creators’ original story they wanted to tell, but is instead an afterthought or tool used to boost the podcast. Which isn’t a problem, I love the idea of mixed media storytelling. I think it’s incredible, but I think it needs to be done well. And having a character explicitly go out and look for a person in the book and then never mention that they had been looking for them when they’ve found them in the podcast does not work. I tried to come up with a reason Lia might not have said anything about her book adventure in the podcast, but the only thing I could imagine was her losing her memory of those events and not knowing it happened.

    The verdict

    The book and podcast do not line up. I can hope that season two changes that, but for now anyone listening and reading will find themselves frustrated by the fact that things don’t seem to make sense. Limetown: The Prequel was trying hard to be its own thing, and would have benefited from simply being Emile’s story, no Lia at all. Her story left me confused and going “But didn’t?” the whole time I read, and again as I re-listened.

    I’m giving this book a 3 out of 5, mostly for Emile’s engaging story and my hope that season 2 will fix some of these issues I’m seeing. The book is actually scheduled to come out after season 2 airs, so I may be missing a lot. My recommendation is listen to the podcast, wait for season two listen to that, and then read the book if you want to know more about Emile’s history.

    As always I received an advanced copy of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest opinion which I have stated above.

  • Molly

    I listened to all of Limetown Season 1 in a day and was immediately devastated to be finished with it, so when this popped up on NetGalley, I was thrilled! The book follows Lia Haddock and her uncle, Emile Haddock, on their alternate journeys to discovering Limetown.

    Unfortunately, I think the book is not nearly as good as the podcast. Each podcast episode ends on a slight cliffhanger, where the listener (or the reporter) is just discovering something deeply unsettling. The book tries to replica

    I listened to all of Limetown Season 1 in a day and was immediately devastated to be finished with it, so when this popped up on NetGalley, I was thrilled! The book follows Lia Haddock and her uncle, Emile Haddock, on their alternate journeys to discovering Limetown.

    Unfortunately, I think the book is not nearly as good as the podcast. Each podcast episode ends on a slight cliffhanger, where the listener (or the reporter) is just discovering something deeply unsettling. The book tries to replicate this, but instead of making the story more compelling, it just becomes more and more frustrating as new mysteries appear without resolution. It was definitely compelling - I read it in two days - but it wasn't nearly as good as listening to the podcast.

    (An aside: can we all agree that not every story needs to be told in *every* medium? Podcasts are being adapted to television shows, FFS. This is getting nonsensical.)

  • Lauren Stoolfire

    is one of my favorite podcasts and I was absolutely thrilled to be approved for this prequel novel on NetGalley. While I liked the premise of the this story, it never managed to quite live up to the premise or my expectations. It tries to copy the style of the podcast, but here it comes off as too choppy for my tastes and it doesn't quite pull off the sense of unease as the original podcast. Plus, there seemed to be some

    is one of my favorite podcasts and I was absolutely thrilled to be approved for this prequel novel on NetGalley. While I liked the premise of the this story, it never managed to quite live up to the premise or my expectations. It tries to copy the style of the podcast, but here it comes off as too choppy for my tastes and it doesn't quite pull off the sense of unease as the original podcast. Plus, there seemed to be some differences in the timelines between the formats as well which got kind of frustrating. All this being said, this prequel still manages to be a compelling read regardless of its flaws. Even if you aren't familiar with the podcast, I have a feeling you'll be after to along without too much trouble. Personally, though, I recommend giving the podcast a try first.

  • Calista Andrechek

    Thank you NetGalley, Cote Smith and Simon & Schuster Canada for the free e-book in exchange for an honest review.

    Seventeen-year old Lia’s life is rocked when she finds out that the entire populations of the small research facility in Limetown have disappeared without a trace. Among the missing is her uncle, Emile Haddock. It’s all everyone can talk about, except Lia’s family, the refuse to discuss anything that has to do with it. With Lia wanting to be a journalist, she delves into her own i

    Thank you NetGalley, Cote Smith and Simon & Schuster Canada for the free e-book in exchange for an honest review.

    Seventeen-year old Lia’s life is rocked when she finds out that the entire populations of the small research facility in Limetown have disappeared without a trace. Among the missing is her uncle, Emile Haddock. It’s all everyone can talk about, except Lia’s family, the refuse to discuss anything that has to do with it. With Lia wanting to be a journalist, she delves into her own investigation and discovers clues about Emile’s past that lead to a secret that you never imagined.

    I wasn’t sure what exactly to think as I have never heard the podcast, but the premise sounded interesting enough for me to want to give it a try. I found it interesting that the book was split up into chapters from Lia’s perspective now and Emile’s perspective from what was happening before Limetown. I was a bit surprised to find out that the book has “special” people in it that others want to study to find a way to open up the brains of the rest of us. I found Emile’s story line much more interesting to me because I liked seeing what was going on back then before Limetown started and the craziness he had to endure. Lia’s story is also interesting, but I found it more choppy and I didn’t enjoy the character very much overall.

    I found most of the timeline in the past a little far fetched for me, but it was still interesting and made me wonder what was going to happen in Lia’s timeline. This book to me was a bit of science fiction almost, but in a thriller way. I found that I had to continue to read on because it was getting intense and I needed to know what was going on and it was so cryptic that I didn’t even have a good guess about what was going to happen. I usually don’t like books that end with a cliffhanger, but it works for this book because now I just want to go and listen to the podcast and see what happens next.

    Pick it up November 13th!

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