12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alon...

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Title:12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos
Author:Jordan B. Peterson
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Edition Language:English

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos Reviews

  • Marianne

    A book by Jordan Peterson, I won’t be able to do it justice.

    12 Rules for Life is a wonderful book. It is typical Peterson with large amounts of insightful information and wit. The book includes information that I knew, did not know, and information I knew but did not know I knew (like a Peterson lecture).

    There are three main points that I took away from this book:

    1. The world is a horrible place filled with suffering. If you personally don’t suffer, someone you know will.

    2. If you want the wo

    A book by Jordan Peterson, I won’t be able to do it justice.

    12 Rules for Life is a wonderful book. It is typical Peterson with large amounts of insightful information and wit. The book includes information that I knew, did not know, and information I knew but did not know I knew (like a Peterson lecture).

    There are three main points that I took away from this book:

    1. The world is a horrible place filled with suffering. If you personally don’t suffer, someone you know will.

    2. If you want the world to be better,start with yourself. The more individual people start bettering themselves the potential for the world to be just that little bit better increases.

    3. We should live on the line between order and chaos. We need both for a functioning society. We need to grow and adapt whilst not getting rid of traditions and traditional structures, they might be very important.

    This is a book I would recommend to everyone whether you’re familiar with Peterson or not.

    Clean your room and sort yourself out.

  • Martin V

    I wish this book had been around to read when I was 18.

  • Charles  Stampul

    Jordan Peterson may be the only clinical psychologist who believes that psychology is subordinate to philosophy and the one thing that psychology and philosophy both genuflect before is story. Story, or myth, predates religion and is, in fact, as old as language itself.

    In his earlier book, Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief, Peterson connects the stories we share with our earliest ancestors with modern knowledge of behavior and the mind. It’s a textbook for his popular University of To

    Jordan Peterson may be the only clinical psychologist who believes that psychology is subordinate to philosophy and the one thing that psychology and philosophy both genuflect before is story. Story, or myth, predates religion and is, in fact, as old as language itself.

    In his earlier book, Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief, Peterson connects the stories we share with our earliest ancestors with modern knowledge of behavior and the mind. It’s a textbook for his popular University of Toronto courses.

    The one-time dish washer and mill worker spent nearly 20 years at the University before garnering international attention. In September 2016, Peterson released a couple of videos opposing an amendment to the Canadian Human Rights Act which he contended could send someone to jail for refusing to use a made-up gender identity pronoun. Peterson went on to testify before the Canadian Senate, and has emerged as a foremost critic of postmodernism on North American campuses.

    Postmodernism is the “new skin of communism,” In Peterson’s view. The ideology has been so thoroughly discredited from an economic standpoint that those who still advocate for it, for either political or emotional reasons, have resorted to attacking the very process in which something can be discredited—reason and debate. At the same time they have worked to change the face of oppression away from those living in poverty toward individuals who don’t look or act like those who hold most of the positions of power and authority in Western society.

    Peterson’s classroom is now the entire globe. Millions are watching his lectures and other videos on YouTube. For this new and greater audience, a more accessible, more affordable compendium than Maps of Meaning was called for.

    12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos is more affordable for sure, but only slightly more accessible. Part self-help book, part memoir, part Maps for the masses, it’s organized sprawlingly.

    (Read full review at

    )

  • ☆♥☆Kotyonok♥☆♥

    ***********************************************

    Watch his latest interview with the idiotic feminist** Cathy Newman:

    Or if you don't want to watch it, the interview in a nutshell:

    In layman's terms:

    He has the patience of a saint XD

    He's a clinical psychologist, cultural critic, and an SJWs worst nightmare--because he uses history, he uses science, he uses FACTS and does not quell the truth for the sake of feelings and the idiocy that "some words hurt", boo-fucking-hoo, cry me a "hate-speech" (aka any opinions that SJWs disagree with, where anyone to right of Bernie Sanders is a Nazi) river.

    I WISH SO MUCH I had a professor like him!

    RTC

    ***********************************************

  • Douglas Wilson

    As I wrote on Twitter, this book contains pockets of silliness connected by long stretches of common grace on fire. Really worthwhile.

  • Ryan Boissonneault

    I see many five-star reviews here, so here is the contrarian position. I’m giving this one star for a couple of reasons.

    1. The content does not justify the length of the book. When you strip away the pseudo-profundity and verbosity, you’re left with rather simple ideas you could find in any self-help book or discover on your own. Rule # 1, for instance, essentially states that females prefer males with confidence and that success breeds confidence and further success. This is rather obvious wit

    I see many five-star reviews here, so here is the contrarian position. I’m giving this one star for a couple of reasons.

    1. The content does not justify the length of the book. When you strip away the pseudo-profundity and verbosity, you’re left with rather simple ideas you could find in any self-help book or discover on your own. Rule # 1, for instance, essentially states that females prefer males with confidence and that success breeds confidence and further success. This is rather obvious without having to understand the evolutionary history of lobsters.

    2. The introduction of the book presents the author as an objective investigator of the truth, disillusioned by dogmatic ideology and prepared to demonstrate its dangers. He then proceeds to incessantly quote from the bible, perhaps the most dogmatic text ever written. I didn’t purchase the book to be preached at, and found it unexpected and highly obnoxious.

    I understand that the author is interested in story and “archetypes,” but the bible is quoted out of proportion. There are many ancient stories to choose from, each with endless interpretive possibilities, but the bible is, for some reason, the primary text. Now I’m sure this is fine with many people, but I was unpleasantly surprised that I had purchased a book on biblical criticism or theology.

    The stories the author has selected to focus on, his preferred interpretations, and the stories he ignores, says more about his psychology than anything else. It appears that he NEEDS religion to be true to prevent his own nihilistic tendencies, a viewpoint he foists on his readers.

    More than once he states in no unequivocal terms that Jesus is the “archetypal perfect man.” Perhaps, but without getting into it here, there are many reasons to think perhaps not. For those more philosophically inclined, or for those that appreciate the progress of humanism and science, Socrates, for example, would probably be a better fit for the archetypal perfect man. And if I want insight into morality and human nature from an ancient source, I’d turn to Plato and Aristotle before the Good Book.

    Again, this is all too subjective, which is the problem in general with using “ancient wisdom” to support a particular viewpoint. The author presents his interpretive schemes as objective truths about human nature and the only display of humility is found in the introduction.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So what is the antidote to Peterson's dark vision of the world, questionable epistemology, and over-reliance on a small sample of religious texts?

    Here's Bertrand Russell, from the concluding paragraph of his essay, Why I Am Not a Christian:

    - Bertrand Russell

  • Sebastian Hill

    If you've never read a book in your life, you'd think JP is super smart. That baroque style of writing, those sentences that never end, the constant references to science and philosophy - "how does the man do it!?" you ask yourself.

    It's simple. The book's actually rubbish but you have nothing to compare it with.

    This book's riddled with logical errors. Facts are ignored and substituted with analogies that simply don't work and don't make sense. Major philosophers are compl

    If you've never read a book in your life, you'd think JP is super smart. That baroque style of writing, those sentences that never end, the constant references to science and philosophy - "how does the man do it!?" you ask yourself.

    It's simple. The book's actually rubbish but you have nothing to compare it with.

    This book's riddled with logical errors. Facts are ignored and substituted with analogies that simply don't work and don't make sense. Major philosophers are completely misrepresented and molded to fit his ideas. Entire sub-chapters are filled with complicated and ultimately pointless mythological and philosophical references... And everything is peppered with common sense statements and citation marks to give it the illusion that it's factual, accurate and logical. It's not. Don't get me started on how bad the writing is. It's like he has a paid thesaurus subscription and wants to get his money's worth. Nobody cares about your rich vocabulary if you lose the point on the way.

    You could spend hours upon hours digging for problems with this book. Some actually have done that. There was a guy on YouTube who made a one hour video dissecting the problems with the citations alone. Yeah, it's that easy to poke holes in his ramblings. He blames "postmodernism" but he misrepresents it. He quotes Heidegger but has no clue what he's been talking about. It's boring and uninspired. But JP fans will love it. He's got his diehard fans who will continue to follow him no matter what, regardless of how bad his ideas are, especially since there's no other conservative smartass to get behind instead.

    So don't bother! He doesn't say anything new and what he does say is said poorly. Not too different from his videos. For the sake of your time and brain, just read something else. Anything from Chomsky, to Pinker, to Friedman or Zizek. Or just read the stoics and the existentialists instead. I mean

    Or Seneca. Or Sartre. Or Dr Seuss - even he has deeper life advice.

    ***

    Responses to replies I'll probably get:

    "Haha, suck it, you triggered SJW" - I'm not mad that JP is writing books, I'm mad that such a bad book is getting attention and is wasting people's time. And that's a stupid response from you.

    "JP is the man, you just can't appreciate his genius" - He's not, he is the very definition of a pseudo-intellectual. There are so many other public intellectuals that are smarter, better spoken and more more respected than JP.

    "You don't know squat, he taught at Harvard!" - He was an associate for a few years, a long time ago. So? Look at him now, when nobody in his university wants to be associated with him. What does that tell you? How can you call that a respected academic?

    "This isn't real criticism" - It's really not, I don't care enough about this to write a 1500 word essay on him. I'm reading some better books right now. But even my rambling makes more sense than his lobster analogy.

  • Mehrsa

    So there is a lot of wisdom in here about how to live your life: don't blame other people, listen and understand other people's perspectives, be honest even though it's uncomfortable, and don't demonize humanity.

    And then all the wisdom goes down the toilet in one particular chapter when he makes a farce of his whole argument. Men are being victimized by liberal academics. Not only does he start blaming everybody and anybody, but he completely mischaracterizes the progressive argument or makes a

    So there is a lot of wisdom in here about how to live your life: don't blame other people, listen and understand other people's perspectives, be honest even though it's uncomfortable, and don't demonize humanity.

    And then all the wisdom goes down the toilet in one particular chapter when he makes a farce of his whole argument. Men are being victimized by liberal academics. Not only does he start blaming everybody and anybody, but he completely mischaracterizes the progressive argument or makes a caricature of it (he had a friend who was liberal and blamed patriarchy for everything and then he killed himself--see? Point proven). He also goes on to demonize anyone pushing for change or gender equality etc. And his proof? Literally, disney movies and the communist revolution gone wrong. But why leave out the revolutions gone right? American? Civil Rights? And why, instead of looking to the little mermaid to draw out wisdom about the true nature of motherhood and women, chalk it up to a crazy sexist script--which it is. Remember how Ariel uses her body language to get the man? I read this book because I was open to hearing from Peterson. I like well-reasoned ideas no matter what their source. And I was ready to hear him and I did most of the way through the book. It was very good--especially his chapters on marriage, parenting, and self-analysis. very good. But then he goes too big and grows quite shrill in his argument. He loses reason to make a point. But I guess controversy creates a best-seller and he knows what he's doing.

    The other logical inconsistencies here were that he keeps using the animal kingdom (i.e. crabs and lobsters) to make a point about human nature--specifically on gender and sexuality, but then in his other more lucid arguments, he argues that we need to fight our nature (self-sacrifice and obedience). So why does it make sense for us to tolerate bullies (he says this) and male superiority because duh the animals do it, but not sloth and dominance because we're Godly dammit.

    I would recommend that the critical reader who wants to read this book also read the history of misogyny as well as the fall of adam and eve to get some perspective on why these ideas got to where they are. Peterson keeps talking about women being chaos and men being order. He never mentions pandora's box, but he does bring up Eve quite a bit. Those two narratives are relatively recent phenomena instead of fixed laws of the universe. He keeps making these essentialist claims that men aren't as emotional as women (which he undercuts by giving example after example of men losing their shit over nothing) and how women are all about nurture, but humans are much more complicated than this. Read the book for the good, but keep one eye good and open to spot the bullshit.

  • Sara

    A soothing and seductive balm for the butthurt. I am fascinated by the cult surrounding this man who, as a previous reviewer noted, relies far too much on simplistic interpretations of Biblical stories and the Disney versions of fairy tales to the expense of all else. (I guess Lilith and Athena might complicate that Easy Bake reimposition of a male-centered narrative.) Here's what I don't get: None of this is new. Joseph Campbell? Heard of him? Remember M. Scott Peck? That Christian head shrinke

    A soothing and seductive balm for the butthurt. I am fascinated by the cult surrounding this man who, as a previous reviewer noted, relies far too much on simplistic interpretations of Biblical stories and the Disney versions of fairy tales to the expense of all else. (I guess Lilith and Athena might complicate that Easy Bake reimposition of a male-centered narrative.) Here's what I don't get: None of this is new. Joseph Campbell? Heard of him? Remember M. Scott Peck? That Christian head shrinker who said, "Life is difficult. Get used to it and it will get better"? Peterson's popularity only reveals that an entire generation has been so robbed of the humanities that they're starving for anyone who will provide a few harsh words and some meaning in their lives. The guy can tell a story. Too bad it's a frighteningly regressive one for women.

    And no: Women's Studies departments are not propagating a myth that the world was once a glorious matriarchy.

    That was funny though.

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