P.S. I Miss You

P.S. I Miss You

In this epistolary middle-grade debut novel, a girl who's questioning her sexual orientation writes letters to her sister, who was sent away from their strict Catholic home after becoming pregnant.Eleven-year-old Evie is heartbroken when her strict Catholic parents send her pregnant sister away to stay with a distant great-aunt. All Evie wants is for her older sister to co...

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Title:P.S. I Miss You
Author:Jen Petro-Roy
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P.S. I Miss You Reviews

  • Jena

    This book, the first from Jen Petro-Roy, is a captivating and authentic story of a young girl as she writes letters to her sister about the issues of their lives. Evie's voice drives the action in a way that feels real and true, with the urgency and intensity of a young woman opening her heart to her older sister and confidante. I highly recommend this book and look forward to its formal publication so that I can share copies of it with the young adults - and not-so-young adults - in my life.

  • Kelly Hager

    This book is AMAZING. I beta read two early versions and cannot wait to read the final. It's sweet and funny and wonderful.

    ETA review of final, published version:

    Jen told me that the final product was different and better from the two versions I'd read. (The second version was different and better from the first, but I was still very skeptical. How could this book be any better? Well. Somehow it is. (Witchcraft?)

    This novel touches on almost everything in its 310 pages---friendship, family, faith

    This book is AMAZING. I beta read two early versions and cannot wait to read the final. It's sweet and funny and wonderful.

    ETA review of final, published version:

    Jen told me that the final product was different and better from the two versions I'd read. (The second version was different and better from the first, but I was still very skeptical. How could this book be any better? Well. Somehow it is. (Witchcraft?)

    This novel touches on almost everything in its 310 pages---friendship, family, faith, crushes, teenage pregnancy...and it's all handled with dignity and respect. Nothing is gratuitous and nothing feels added for shock value. Evie grapples with her faith and spends time trying to figure out what she believes (as opposed to what she's been raised to believe) and ultimately continues to find comfort in the church, even when she's mad at God (and her parents). 

    This is a story that trusts kids to draw their own conclusions. Who's right in this? Who's wrong? If the wrong things are done, can they still be done for the right reasons? Are some things unforgivable? (These questions will make more sense in the context of the story when you read it, but they're things to think about anyway, right?)

    This would be a good book to read with your kids or as part of a book club. Great discussions are sure to follow. Highly, highly recommended.

  • A. Ledger

    This gorgeous book will wreck you! But in a good way? I found Evie so relatable (and sweet). It's going to be life-changing for young LGB+ kids that have never seen themselves in a book before. The ending had me all teary, and I loved seeing a story that didn't come to a tidy little conclusion. This is a heartbreaking but hopeful (and true to life) story about a lesbian growing up in a strict, conservative household. Evie's character growth was perfect. I loved watching her come into her own!

  • Carin

    This book wrecked me. At fist, I just thought it was a sweet story, albeit around some deeper topics, but the end had me sobbing (and I am not an easy book crier.) Literally, I was reading in bed after my husband had gone to sleep and while I was able to be quiet, I had to get out of bed because I was sobbing so hard I was shaking the bed and I was afraid I would wake him up.

    Cilla got pregnant in high school, and her parents sent her away to live with an aunt in Virginia, as they are super-Catho

    This book wrecked me. At fist, I just thought it was a sweet story, albeit around some deeper topics, but the end had me sobbing (and I am not an easy book crier.) Literally, I was reading in bed after my husband had gone to sleep and while I was able to be quiet, I had to get out of bed because I was sobbing so hard I was shaking the bed and I was afraid I would wake him up.

    Cilla got pregnant in high school, and her parents sent her away to live with an aunt in Virginia, as they are super-Catholics (I say, having been raised as a liberal Catholic), and it's embarrassing and shameful to her parents. Her little sister Evie, finds her parents' reaction to Cilla's pregnancy, embarrassing and shameful. Who send their child away in her moment of need? Who denies that they have a daughter just because she made a mistake? If this is what their religion tells them to do, maybe Evie doesn't need their religion. And given how they treated Cilla, Evie can only imagine how her parents would behave if they found out about the feelings she's been having for her new friend, June. So instead, she writes to Cilla, first at their aunt's, and then later at the Catholic boarding school where she's going to finish up school after the birth and adoption. Cilla doesn't answer, but Evie persists nonetheless.

    Cilla seems like she was a good big sister, and even without her responses, it's nice to see how Evie uses their one-sided communication to help her work out some questions about religion, faith, doubt, trust, love, and grief. And then there's a big twist. And it's the aftermath of that twist that left me so touched that even weeks later, when talking about that point in the book, I still get teary-eyed. It's a powerful and moving book, perfect for older preteens and younger teens, covering some serious topics with a believable main character, written with a deft hand.

  • Rachel Solomon

    I LOVED this book. I'd been eager for it since the deal announcement, and wow -- it blew me away. Evie's connection to her sister is so beautifully, authentically rendered, and I loved the epistolary format. This is a middle-grade novel that explores religion, sexual orientation, teen pregnancy, and so much more. I can't wait for kids who need it to discover it; I truly think it will hugely and positively impact so many young lives. P.S. I MISS YOU is an important, heartbreaking, boundary-pushin

    I LOVED this book. I'd been eager for it since the deal announcement, and wow -- it blew me away. Evie's connection to her sister is so beautifully, authentically rendered, and I loved the epistolary format. This is a middle-grade novel that explores religion, sexual orientation, teen pregnancy, and so much more. I can't wait for kids who need it to discover it; I truly think it will hugely and positively impact so many young lives. P.S. I MISS YOU is an important, heartbreaking, boundary-pushing MG you won't soon forget.

  • Pam

    I have been sitting on this review for a while because I am not entirely sure that my words will do the book justice. There are also a lot of feelings involved in this darling book and I will attempt to keep it together as I navigate those.

    As a disclaimer, Jen Petro-Roy is a dear, dear friend and I have been waiting for this novel since she began the journey of bringing it to life. That aside, I can not imagine that my review would be any less sparkling if it were for a complete stranger.

    What I

    I have been sitting on this review for a while because I am not entirely sure that my words will do the book justice. There are also a lot of feelings involved in this darling book and I will attempt to keep it together as I navigate those.

    As a disclaimer, Jen Petro-Roy is a dear, dear friend and I have been waiting for this novel since she began the journey of bringing it to life. That aside, I can not imagine that my review would be any less sparkling if it were for a complete stranger.

    What I can tell you is that you will need to make sure your heartstrings are securely fastened before you start reading.

    Evie, the young protagonist, is the expertly written voice that drives this narrative in the form of letters to her older sister, Cilla. We are not immediately clued in to where the sisters are but it soon becomes apparent that Evie is still at home with overly strict parents, while Cilla has been ushered away to deal with a more delicate matter.

    The sisters' parents are a picture-perfect illustration of adults trying to do the right thing but missing the mark, terribly. If you grew up in a Catholic town, like I did, you will find familiar faces in their feelings, both frustratingly and empathetically.  They are easy to hate but Jen does such an incredible job of painting them in a light that allows the reader to understand that they are just as lost as their daughters.

    As far as the sisters, I found myself pausing to reflect on my own sibling relationship in a heavy way. Without unloading my entire history, let me just say that the longing and desperation in Evie's reaching for her missing companion rang true in both directions, for me. There is nothing quite like the arresting tug of a younger sister in need of guidance. Perhaps it hit a little close to home for me, as the older sister who lives entirely too far away from her tiny sister.

    Ok, see, this is why I have been hesitant to put my thoughts into words. I promise I'm going to collect myself off the floor, here.

    It is so hard for me to refrain from gushing like a middle schooler in writing this but I need to explain, in no uncertain terms, that the thing that P. S. I Miss You just absolutely nails is the emotional voice of each piece of this puzzle. Jen manages to get right into Evie's head, capturing the young voice in a way that is completely authentic to her age but one hundred percent relatable to an older audience.

    I know this review is a bit early and I will be talking about it a great deal more before it is released in March (so be prepared), however, it deserves to be read early and again and again.

    As a debut (and as a novel, in general) this is a total home run.

  • Jenn Bishop

    This beautiful, moving story celebrates the deep connection between sisters. Evie's letters to her older sister Cilla, sent away by conservative Catholic parents after becoming pregnant in high school, give such a detailed glimpse into the life and mind of the seventh grade protagonist. Evie's admiration for Cilla shines throughout, as well as the way she sees herself as akin to her sister -- is she a sinner in her parents' eyes, too, because she has a crush on her female friend, June? I loved f

    This beautiful, moving story celebrates the deep connection between sisters. Evie's letters to her older sister Cilla, sent away by conservative Catholic parents after becoming pregnant in high school, give such a detailed glimpse into the life and mind of the seventh grade protagonist. Evie's admiration for Cilla shines throughout, as well as the way she sees herself as akin to her sister -- is she a sinner in her parents' eyes, too, because she has a crush on her female friend, June? I loved following along as Evie turns over so many deep questions in her mind. I yearned for Cilla and Evie's parents to reconsider their strongly held beliefs and become more compassionate, yet their portrayal is unfortunately true to life in this very polarized historical moment we find ourselves in. This story will stick with me for a long time.

  • Laurie

    Interest Level 3-6

    5 out of 5 Stars!!!!!!

    I don't even know where to start with this one! This book is so full of raw emotion that it will have you laughing one minute and crying the next. This is the story of Evie, a 12-year-old girl growing up in a very strict Catholic home. When her sister is sent away to live with their distant aunt because she got pregnant at sixteen, all Evie can do is write her letters. As Evie writes to her sister, Cilla, she tells her everything that is going on in her li

    Interest Level 3-6

    5 out of 5 Stars!!!!!!

    I don't even know where to start with this one! This book is so full of raw emotion that it will have you laughing one minute and crying the next. This is the story of Evie, a 12-year-old girl growing up in a very strict Catholic home. When her sister is sent away to live with their distant aunt because she got pregnant at sixteen, all Evie can do is write her letters. As Evie writes to her sister, Cilla, she tells her everything that is going on in her life. Evie has two best friends but when she meets June, things begin to shift and Evie has to try to sort though these new feelings. This is a story of lies, deception, finding yourself and having the courage to be yourself, friendship, love and so much more! Will Evie have the courage to expose her family secrets, find her sister, and become the person she thinks she is becoming. Read this book to find out what happens to Evie, June, Cilla, and the rest of her family.

    I am giving you fair warning that when you get to about the last 100 pages of this book you will not be able to put it down. Jen Petro-Roy's debut book is a winner and I cannot wait to read future books!

    Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own.

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  • Jenn

    Heartbreaking and beautiful, this book is an epistolary narrative from a younger sister to her older sister, Cilla, who has, we learn, been sent away from home by their very Catholic parents because she became pregnant as a teen.

    However, we soon learn that there is more to the story, especially as our protagonist mixes her loneliness at losing her confidant and idol with her growing awareness of affection towards June, the new girl in school.

    I loved this book for how Evie evolves and becomes m

    Heartbreaking and beautiful, this book is an epistolary narrative from a younger sister to her older sister, Cilla, who has, we learn, been sent away from home by their very Catholic parents because she became pregnant as a teen.

    However, we soon learn that there is more to the story, especially as our protagonist mixes her loneliness at losing her confidant and idol with her growing awareness of affection towards June, the new girl in school.

    I loved this book for how Evie evolves and becomes more and more self-aware and confident through her letters to her sister, and how even the shocking news about her family allows her room to reflect and redefine who she wants to be.

    I know that the author has faced some difficulties with schools not wanting her to visit, and I think that's a shame. Any book that helps middle grade students to face their feelings and to recognize that strong emotions are not a bad thing, but rather a part of life and something that helps us to grow and redefine who we are is a gem and should be shared everywhere.

    Note: A copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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