Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz

Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz

“Only staying active will make you want to live a hundred years.” —Japanese proverb According to the Japanese, everyone has an ikigai—a reason for living. And according to the residents of the Japanese village with the world’s longest-living people, finding it is the key to a happier and longer life. Having a strong sense of ikigai—the place where passion, mission, vocatio...

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Title:Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz
Author:Hector Garcia Puigcerver
Rating:
Edition Language:Spanish

Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz Reviews

  • Nadia King

    I literally inhaled this book. Ikigai is a beautiful book about Japanese culture and discusses the secret to a long and happy life. If you're interested in Japanese culture and self-development this gorgeous book is for you. Just reading this had a calm and centering effect on me. "Happiness is always determined by your heart." 💙

  • Didem Gürpınar

    İlgi çekici ve hızlı okunabilen bir kitap. Çoğumuzun bildiği fakat her zaman uygulayamadığı güzel bir yaşam felsefesini açıklıyor. Bu konudaki kitapları hiç okumamış ve başlangıç seviyesinde olanlara tavsiye ederim. Fakat bu konuda kafa yormuş kişiler için biraz basit kalabiir.

    Uzun yaşayan insanlarla yapılan röportajlar ve bu konuda yapılan yorumlar kitabın en ilgi çekici yeriydi bence. Son olarak dikkatimi çeken ve beni düşünüren birkaç cümleyi paylaşmak istiyorum.

    "Güzelliği mükemmellikte değ

    İlgi çekici ve hızlı okunabilen bir kitap. Çoğumuzun bildiği fakat her zaman uygulayamadığı güzel bir yaşam felsefesini açıklıyor. Bu konudaki kitapları hiç okumamış ve başlangıç seviyesinde olanlara tavsiye ederim. Fakat bu konuda kafa yormuş kişiler için biraz basit kalabiir.

    Uzun yaşayan insanlarla yapılan röportajlar ve bu konuda yapılan yorumlar kitabın en ilgi çekici yeriydi bence. Son olarak dikkatimi çeken ve beni düşünüren birkaç cümleyi paylaşmak istiyorum.

    "Güzelliği mükemmellikte değil, kusurlu ve eksik şeylerde aramalıyız." (s160)

    "Hayat kusurludur. Zamanın akıp geçmesi, her şeyin geçici olduğunu gösterir."(s166)

  • Kyriakos S Kyriakou

    Όποιος είναι έτοιμος να κερδίσει κάτι από ένα βιβλίο θα βγει σίγουρα κερδισμένος και με αυτό το βιβλίο! Η επανάληψη δεν έβλαψε κανένα!

  • Irmak

    Beklentimi hiçbir açıdan karşılamayan bir kitap oldu Ikigai. İçerisinde birçoğumuzun bilmediği çok az şey barındırıyordu ki onlarda Japonlara has şeylerdi zaten. Diğer anlatılan her şey bir şekilde kulağımıza gelmiş olan, okuduğumuz ya da büyüklerimiz tarafından bize söylenen şeylerdi. Bu açıdan bana bir şeyler katan bir kitap olmadı.

    Kitap boyunca devamlı başka kitaplardan alıntılama, o kitaplardan verilen örnekler üzerinden ilerleme vardı. Ve bu beni bi yerden sonra rahatsız etti çünkü başka ki

    Beklentimi hiçbir açıdan karşılamayan bir kitap oldu Ikigai. İçerisinde birçoğumuzun bilmediği çok az şey barındırıyordu ki onlarda Japonlara has şeylerdi zaten. Diğer anlatılan her şey bir şekilde kulağımıza gelmiş olan, okuduğumuz ya da büyüklerimiz tarafından bize söylenen şeylerdi. Bu açıdan bana bir şeyler katan bir kitap olmadı.

    Kitap boyunca devamlı başka kitaplardan alıntılama, o kitaplardan verilen örnekler üzerinden ilerleme vardı. Ve bu beni bi yerden sonra rahatsız etti çünkü başka kitaplardan kırpılan bilgilerin derlemesini okuyor gibi hissetmeme sebep oldu.

    Üstelik kitap Japonların uzun yaşam sırrını bir şekilde bize aktarmaya çalışsa da mutlu yaşam sırrını aktaramamıştı. Bu tarz bir şeyi okuduğum zaman hayatıma nasıl uygulayacağımı da bana örneklendirmesini isterim, bu kitapta bunu bulamadım ben.

    Yani işin özü biraz şişirilmiş bir kitap olduğunu düşünüyorum.

    Güzel reklamı yapıldı, helal olsun.

  • Helen

    Meh. It's really just a recap of The Blue Zones of Happiness with emphasis on the Okinawa aspect. The quote I find most disconcerting, after reading the entire book, is "There is no perfect strategy to connecting with our ikigai"....but (what we learn from the Okinawans) is "don't worry too much about finding it." But then, in the next and final page, they say, "if you don't know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it."

    So which is it? And aside from exerci

    Meh. It's really just a recap of The Blue Zones of Happiness with emphasis on the Okinawa aspect. The quote I find most disconcerting, after reading the entire book, is "There is no perfect strategy to connecting with our ikigai"....but (what we learn from the Okinawans) is "don't worry too much about finding it." But then, in the next and final page, they say, "if you don't know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it."

    So which is it? And aside from exercising and eating vegetables, how do we find this elusive purpose? "Do stuff that gives you Flow"...I don't believe ikigai/purpose necessarily provide an inclination toward Flow. But if that is the case, read Csikszentmihalyi's book rather than this one.

  • Jasmin Martin

    I expected more but this book disappoints. It doesnt seem to follow a clear thread but rather jumps randomly around from one fact to another (which the authors thought relevant) such as stress and what it does to the body, and then short profiles on some of the longest lived persons on the planet. These don't have much to do with the Ogimi folk of Okinawa that the researchers were going to visit and interview. I though they were going to write about them and their entire time spent with them, bu

    I expected more but this book disappoints. It doesnt seem to follow a clear thread but rather jumps randomly around from one fact to another (which the authors thought relevant) such as stress and what it does to the body, and then short profiles on some of the longest lived persons on the planet. These don't have much to do with the Ogimi folk of Okinawa that the researchers were going to visit and interview. I though they were going to write about them and their entire time spent with them, but this is only a small feature in the book. The other thing that annoys me is when scientists try to interpret something abstract and philosophical using an outsider's point of view and quantitative methods. Already when they wrote in the beginning chapter that they couldn't believe that only the Okinawan diet and some other 'lesser' important activities could help the population live long, I thought, ok, here we go. Basically what this book told me was that they hadn't understood anything. And were coming quite late to the party with facts about health, holism and nature, that can be read and explored much better in other books. Not worth the read.

  • BookishDubai

    This book has nothing to do with

    . Honestly it should've been titled

    .

  • Chris Chester

    I kind of feel bad panning this book, because I think helping people find their ikigai -- or their purpose in life -- is a worthwhile goal.

    The problem is, I have to think that the author and his publisher know that this book doesn't come anywhere close to achieving that goal.

    Instead, this book is a jumbled mess. It borrows heavily from the work of others, from Victor Frankl to the guys studying flow states, slaps on a thin veneer of received wisdom from Japanese octogenarians and attempts to pas

    I kind of feel bad panning this book, because I think helping people find their ikigai -- or their purpose in life -- is a worthwhile goal.

    The problem is, I have to think that the author and his publisher know that this book doesn't come anywhere close to achieving that goal.

    Instead, this book is a jumbled mess. It borrows heavily from the work of others, from Victor Frankl to the guys studying flow states, slaps on a thin veneer of received wisdom from Japanese octogenarians and attempts to pass the whole thing off as a guide for living.

    And when I say the veneer of Japanese culture is thin, I mean it is THIN. The author took a trip to Okinawa at some point and has some quotes from old folks there. He makes references to big cultural figures like Miyazaki and Murakami, does some hand-waving at tai-chi and green tea and calls it a day.

    And the whole package isn't even put together well. It repeats itself several times (did you know old people on Okinawa tend vegetable gardens? because you will hear about it!) and the structure is just a jumbled mess.

    Stay away.

  • Gabriela

    I could live with the fact that every idea about the Western approach to finding a purpose in life is taken from Frankl, Taleb and a few others. With no personal contribution from the authors. But to claim that you interviewed 100 people from Okinawa and to present your readers with no more than 5 pages of random (and in no way revealing, profound or even interesting) quotes from these interviews...that is just disrespectful. To the reader and to the interviewees.

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