Dagger and Coin

Dagger and Coin

Soraya Gamo was meant to be queen of Qilara, until an Arnath slave rebellion destroyed the monarchy and the capital city. Now, improbably, she sits on the new Ruling Council beside her former enemies, finally holding the political power she always wanted - but over a nation in ruins. As she works to rebuild Qilara, she can, at last, use what everyone once told her to hide:...

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Title:Dagger and Coin
Author:Kathy MacMillan
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Edition Language:English

Dagger and Coin Reviews

  • Kathy MacMillan

    For those who have asked what book 2 will be about:

    -Dagger and Coin picks up about 30 days after the events of Sword and Verse. However, I prefer to think of it as a companion novel rather than a sequel, because it focuses on a different protagonist and can be enjoyed even if you haven’t read the first book.

    -The main character in Dagger and Coin is Soraya Gamo, the heiress who was engaged to Mati and was all set to become queen. We saw in Sword and Verse that Soraya was much more than just a pre

    For those who have asked what book 2 will be about:

    -Dagger and Coin picks up about 30 days after the events of Sword and Verse. However, I prefer to think of it as a companion novel rather than a sequel, because it focuses on a different protagonist and can be enjoyed even if you haven’t read the first book.

    -The main character in Dagger and Coin is Soraya Gamo, the heiress who was engaged to Mati and was all set to become queen. We saw in Sword and Verse that Soraya was much more than just a pretty rich girl, and in this book she has thrown her lot in with her former enemies in order to pursue her ambitions.

    -Many of the major players from Sword and Verse appear in this book, especially Raisa, Mati, and Jonis. We also get to know some minor characters from the first book better: Deshti (Raisa’s adversary in the Arnath Resistance), Alshara (Soraya’s younger sister), and Gelti Dimmin (that handsome guard captain).

    -Decisions made in Sword and Verse come back to haunt our characters in Dagger and Coin, particularly a big one made by Mati. Sword and Verse was about upending an unjust system; Dagger and Coin is about the messy, seemingly impossible task of constructing a better one in its place.

    -This book is unabashedly, fiercely feminist. In 2016, I thought, “Oh, I wish this book were out now! It’s so relevant!” In 2017, I thought the same thing. Sadly, I don’t think this story is going to get any less relevant in coming years.

    -I like to think of this book as a tale of a well-educated female policy wonk battling her misogynist foes. In case you are wondering about my politics. 😉

    -I’m just going to put this out there right now, because some people have mentioned it: Soraya and Jonis are NOT EVER going to be a couple. Just not going to happen. Soraya’s relationship with Jonis is arguably the most important one in the book, but don’t look for kissing there. Just don’t.

    -Look for kissing (and more) elsewhere, though. There is romance in this book, just not with Jonis.

    -Like Sword and Verse, Dagger and Coin can be read and enjoyed as a standalone. Of course, it also features lots of rewarding tidbits for readers of both books! And yes, if you read Dagger and Coin first, it will give you lots of spoilers for Sword and Verse, so be warned if that sort of thing bothers you. (Personally, I love spoilers, but I am weird that way.)

    -I’m seriously considering making myself a bingo card of all the things that Soraya will undoubtedly be called once the book is out in the world. I mean, she’s an ambitious woman, see, so of course that means she must be inviting the whole world to comment on what’s wrong with her. A few of my predictions: too proud, too strong, too passive, too emotional, too icy, too ambitious, too shrill, too slutty, too prudish, too petty, too demanding, too calculating…

    -The story of the gods comes into play in Dagger and Coin, but in a different way than it did in Sword and Verse, because Soraya’s relationship to the gods is completely different from Raisa’s.

    -I really, really love this book and I can’t wait to share it with you!

  • Meg Eden

    What I loved about Sword & Verse was how MacMillan constantly subverted my expectations and painted a complicated portrait of what it means to fight for freedom, and how to change the world around you. No perfect idealizations, but the tough complicated questions that really make us think.

    Dagger & Coin fails to disappoint in this way as well--especially towards the end, we as readers have to constantly check our expectations and assumptions. I don't want to spoil anything, but some reall

    What I loved about Sword & Verse was how MacMillan constantly subverted my expectations and painted a complicated portrait of what it means to fight for freedom, and how to change the world around you. No perfect idealizations, but the tough complicated questions that really make us think.

    Dagger & Coin fails to disappoint in this way as well--especially towards the end, we as readers have to constantly check our expectations and assumptions. I don't want to spoil anything, but some really surprising turns happen towards the end that are SO EARNED, and made me literally gasp out loud!

    Dagger & Coin really interrogates how women are defined in their culture, and shows the portrait of a young woman subverting cultural expectations to pave her own path. It also interrogates the complicated, messy business of making a better society. The world and the struggles are so real and particularly relevant to contemporary concerns that I CAN'T OVEREMPHASIZE HOW MUCH I RECOMMEND THIS BOOK, particularly as a book club read or something to launch into discussions with other readers!!

    Soraya is a very different protagonist than Raisa. Both are feminists, but have different strengths and approaches to the world around them. It took me a while to get into Soraya's voice, but I realized that this was largely because of my own expectations and assumptions (again, I LOVE this about MacMillan's work--not only does it interrogate the world of the story, but made me interrogate myself--so much love!). I realized I was labelling Soraya based on bizarre cultural expectations I didn't even realize I had internalized. I initially found her "cold" and "unfeeling." Then I started thinking about all the other situations in which women are labelled "cold" and "unfeeling" just because they don't meet some cultural expectation of femininity, and I was like WOW. What am I doing????

    I also found it funny that I jumped to these expectations because I RELATE TO SORAYA SO MUCH. I'm very business minded. Efficiency minded. I like doing my work and doing it well. I don't like anyone getting in the way of my plan or system. I'm not a "Gamo" but I'm an "Eden" and I have pride in what I perceive as my family's traits and values. I don't have accounting scrolls but I do have Excel :) And I LOVE that there's representation of this type of character as a female MC, especially in YA!

    And over time, I fell more and more in love with Soraya. She internally challenges how others call her "cold" (like I did at the beginning!), and has some really raw and real self-doubt. I didn't always agree with her choices, but I related to them 110% and felt just as shocked as she did to some twists toward the end. I really loved seeing her strength--which again, was different than Raisa's strength--but I love that together, these books paint two different portraits of what strength can look like.

    I'm going to be super honest though--it took me a while to get into this book. That's less because of Dagger & Coin itself and more because I'm not super into politically driven stories. That said, if you're like me and start reading and are like, "Eh I'm not sure I'm invested in the politics," KEEP READING. If you're not like me and are super into politics, then well, you'll just be hooked from the start! There are a lot of characters and a lot of threads to follow (which I'm not very good at), but don't miss the forest for the trees. Dagger & Coin is an important feminist story, and no matter where your interests lie as a reader, I'm confident you'll find a string that pulls you in and won't let you go until you're done. :)

  • Janet

    I could not put this book down. I was reading late into the night, and leaving all the things I should have been doing for another time. Dagger and Coin takes place shortly after then end of Sword and Verse, but this story is from the point of view of Soraya, one of the antagonists from Book 1.

    Soraya was fascinating. She knew how to wield power, and she was smart and capable. Yet as a woman, she is constantly being underestimated and looked down on. This book is about bringing two groups who wer

    I could not put this book down. I was reading late into the night, and leaving all the things I should have been doing for another time. Dagger and Coin takes place shortly after then end of Sword and Verse, but this story is from the point of view of Soraya, one of the antagonists from Book 1.

    Soraya was fascinating. She knew how to wield power, and she was smart and capable. Yet as a woman, she is constantly being underestimated and looked down on. This book is about bringing two groups who were once enemies together. About finding peace after war, about rebuilding after the upheaval. It can be so hard to trust those who were once on the opposite side, but without that, you have no foundation to build on.

    I thought MacMillan did a brilliant job of portraying the aftermath. I couldn't look away, and I was astonished at how fearlessly she threw intrigue after intrigue, complication after complication at her characters. She could definitely teach a class about how to put your characters through the refining fire.

    I should have probably re-read the first book before diving in, but I just couldn't wait. And while you can read this second book as a stand-alone, there are references that will make a lot more sense if you read book 1 first.

    I highly recommend this one!

  • Tati

    Soooo, what's this going to be about?

    (I didn't think there was room left for a sequel, to be honest)

  • Jamie Coudeville

    2018?!

  • Catarina (TravelerBetweenWorlds)

    2018?? I was wondering if I would read this one or not but well I have plenty of time to think, though I would like to continue the series.

  • Clare

    I didn't realise that there was going to be sequel to

    . I have another book coming out this year to look forward to now!

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