The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life

In this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people.For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live w...

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Title:The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
Author:Mark Manson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life Reviews

  • Khadidja

    Masterpiece, incredibly funny. i don't usally go for

    but this one was the exception. Anything with curse words on the cover picks my interest :P The first half of it was my favorite, the aim of this book is to help the reader to think a little bit more clearly about what they’re choosing to find important in life and what they’re choosi

    Masterpiece, incredibly funny. i don't usally go for

    but this one was the exception. Anything with curse words on the cover picks my interest :P The first half of it was my favorite, the aim of this book is to help the reader to think a little bit more clearly about what they’re choosing to find important in life and what they’re choosing to find unimportant.

    These are few of my favrite quotes in this book:

    The desire for more positive experience is itself a negative experience. And, paradoxically, the acceptance of one’s negative experience is itself a positive experience.

    Self-improvement and success often occur together. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the same thing.

    Our culture today is obsessively focused on unrealistically positive expectations: Be happier. Be healthier. Be the best, better than the rest. Be smarter, faster, richer, sexier, more popular, more productive, more envied, and more admired. Be perfect and amazing and crap out twelve-karat-gold nuggets before breakfast each morning while kissing your selfie-ready spouse and two and a half kids goodbye. Then fly your helicopter to your wonderfully fulfilling job, where you spend your days doing incredibly meaningful work that’s likely to save the planet one day.

    Ironically, this fixation on the positive—on what’s better, what’s superior—only serves to remind us over and over again of what we are not, of what we lack, of what we should have been but failed to be. After all, no truly happy person feels the need to stand in front of a mirror and recite that she’s happy. She just is.

    Everyone and their TV commercial wants you to believe that the key to a good life is a nicer job, or a more rugged car, or a prettier girlfriend, or a hot tub with an inflatable pool for the kids. The world is constantly telling you that the path to a better life is more, more, more—buy more, own more, make more, fuck more, be more. You are constantly bombarded with messages to give a fuck about everything, all the time. Give a fuck about a new TV. Give a fuck about having a better vacation than your coworkers. Give a fuck about buying that new lawn ornament. Give a fuck about having the right kind of selfie stick.

    The Feedback Loop from Hell

    There’s an insidious quirk to your brain that, if you let it, can drive you absolutely batty. Tell me if this sounds familiar to you: You get anxious about confronting somebody in your life. That anxiety cripples you and you start wondering why you’re so anxious. Now you’re becoming anxious about being anxious. Oh no! Doubly anxious! Now you’re anxious about your anxiety, which is causing more anxiety. Quick, where’s the whiskey?

  • Kevin Kelsey

    Sort of an anti self-help book, meaning that it actually contains a useful philosophy, which is (mostly) just Buddhism/Stoicism dressed up a little for millennials. It's not

    douchey as the title would have you think, and it's very entertaining. There's a lot of cross-over with Carl Sagan's

    , surprisingly. A lot of good advice for those, like me, who over-stress themselves about mostly nothing at all. I really loved it; I'll probably circle back to it a

    Sort of an anti self-help book, meaning that it actually contains a useful philosophy, which is (mostly) just Buddhism/Stoicism dressed up a little for millennials. It's not

    douchey as the title would have you think, and it's very entertaining. There's a lot of cross-over with Carl Sagan's

    , surprisingly. A lot of good advice for those, like me, who over-stress themselves about mostly nothing at all. I really loved it; I'll probably circle back to it a few more times in the future.

  • Nat

    I went into this admittedly with quite some skepticism and entitlement— “what is this going to teach me that I don’t already know?”— but

    is truly one of the most ground-shaping nonfiction books I’ve read so far. It will and can change a perspective, a life. And as such, this is the perfect book to give to your loved ones on holidays, birthdays...

    It made me rethink all the times I ever gave a fuck over some of the most irrelevant things in hindsight. It made me

    I went into this admittedly with quite some skepticism and entitlement— “what is this going to teach me that I don’t already know?”— but

    is truly one of the most ground-shaping nonfiction books I’ve read so far. It will and can change a perspective, a life. And as such, this is the perfect book to give to your loved ones on holidays, birthdays...

    It made me rethink all the times I ever gave a fuck over some of the most irrelevant things in hindsight. It made me realize that it’s sometimes necessary to take a step back and re-evaluate why I think so-and-so on a daily basis.

    I also wrote down a lot of Mark Manson’s writing into my notes because I knew I would need it in the near future. And I would like to thank him for answering quite a lot of fears of mine with such a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth.

    was both personally relevant and entertaining.

    Here are a few pieces that helped me and then some:

    This is exactly how I feel when I give too many fucks about things that have little lasting impact on my life.

    Disappointment Panda was one of the best additions to this book.

    This book is slowly but surely shifting my world.

    That side note is speaking the truth!!!

    Taking responsibly for your actions, but not blaming yourself was one of the most valuable lessons I got from Mark Manson.

    He’s changing my world right now.

    I didn't even realize I felt this way until I saw it so clearly on paper.

    That thing about the plane is 100% me!! So I get it know: if you think you’re special—decide not to be.

    Damn, I wasn’t prepared for

    to completely change my worldview in such a meaningful way. I will cherish this book for a long time to come.

    ,

    Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with

  • Val Shameless ⚓️ Steamy Reads ⚓️

    In fact, my best friend had the below picture as my contact photo in his phone for years.

    So it should come as no surprise that I, like many, was drawn to this book, 1) Because it has the word "fuck" in the title. Duh. And, 2) Because it's bright fucking orange.

    That said, the chum was in the water for me already based on that alone.

    But when I got to t

    In fact, my best friend had the below picture as my contact photo in his phone for years.

    So it should come as no surprise that I, like many, was drawn to this book, 1) Because it has the word "fuck" in the title. Duh. And, 2) Because it's bright fucking orange.

    That said, the chum was in the water for me already based on that alone.

    But when I got to this:

    I knew this book and I would be friends.

    I am SO anti-participation trophy it's ridiculous.

    And, no, I don't care if that offends all the middle class helicopter moms and their special snowflakes.

    Your kid needs to learn how to lose.

    That's how character is built, my friends.

    And that's pretty much one of the major points in this book actually.

    That and, simply put, prioritizing where you put your emotional energy aka your fucks.

    Stuff I have a solid a handle on already.

    But, full transparency, I read this out of curiosity and with a slim to none expectation of there being anything life changing to take away from it.

    Don't get me wrong, color me surprised, I thought this book made a lot of solid points.

    Some really good, well articulated ones actually.

    I definitely do think this book has something to offer.

    For example, it reminded me that I need to stop hoping my sister and I form a BFF Sweet Valley High-esque sister friendship and accept the fact that we are 35+ fucking years old and it's just not gonna happen.

    And that's okay. She only texts me when she wants or needs something and, while we love and respect each other - we just aren't all THAT.

    And that's okay.

    As I said, it made good points - none of which the author attempted to claim creating - he just wrote it down in an easy, witty, sometimes offensive and conversational fashion with examples of his own life and personal epiphanies.

    It did get a little ridiculous sometimes with how much he referred to his former "bangs all the ladies" behavior.

    We get it, you are a walking dream machine. *eye roll*

    It also contradicted itself a bit in some areas, though nothing detrimental in my eyes.

    He also definitely walked a fine line when discussing certain issues as they pertain to women.

    Feminists and just some women in general will NOT appreciate this book.

    Not gonna lie though, right or wrong, this book definitely appealed to my snarky, crass kind of humor, reminding me once again that I apparently have the personality and sense of humor of a dude.

    But whatevers.

    That's not a fuck I care to give, apparently.

  • Jen

    Based on the title, I was pretty stoked for this, and the introductory essay explaining the author's Not Giving a F*ck theory made a lot of sense to me and made me really happy. Essentially, he says that the internet and the media demand that we give a f*ck about everything, but we only have so much time on Earth and so many f*cks to give and we have to choose who and what we spend those f*cks on.

    Makes sense.

    Unfortunately, the rest of the book turns into the same self-help drivel you see in any

    Based on the title, I was pretty stoked for this, and the introductory essay explaining the author's Not Giving a F*ck theory made a lot of sense to me and made me really happy. Essentially, he says that the internet and the media demand that we give a f*ck about everything, but we only have so much time on Earth and so many f*cks to give and we have to choose who and what we spend those f*cks on.

    Makes sense.

    Unfortunately, the rest of the book turns into the same self-help drivel you see in any other "how to be happy" kind of book, only Manson starts to present the information with a tone reminiscent of an Andrew Dice Clay routine. No bueno. I ended up having to bail.

  • Mary Monaghan

    I started out liking this book, I really did. By the time I was halfway in, his smug attitude about things he frankly knows jack shit about were getting on my nerves. He made some excellent points, all of which have been made countless times by other, more competent writers. Read Sartre, Camus, Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, and various Buddhist texts instead. Regurgitating Eastern philosophy and existentialism while swearing a lot only gets you so far. I stopped reading and returned this book.

  • Amy Joseph

    Have you ever been in a bar and had a know-it-all tell you everything you need to know about life without any evidence to back up what he's saying? That's what this book felt like.

  • libbyscreen

    I'm not actually done yet, but this book is becoming more problematic by the page. In re: false memories and page 128: False memories are absolutely a thing. But when the example you use to illustrate this fact is a 1980's feminist who falsely accused her father of abuse and you follow up with "in the early 1980s and 1990s hundreds of innocent people were wrongly accused of sexual violence under similar circumstances. Many of them went to prison for it" you are being supremely irresponsible. The

    I'm not actually done yet, but this book is becoming more problematic by the page. In re: false memories and page 128: False memories are absolutely a thing. But when the example you use to illustrate this fact is a 1980's feminist who falsely accused her father of abuse and you follow up with "in the early 1980s and 1990s hundreds of innocent people were wrongly accused of sexual violence under similar circumstances. Many of them went to prison for it" you are being supremely irresponsible. The casual reader who is not familiar with sexual violence and rape and abuse could easily walk away with the impression that survivors of sexual assault often make up their assault. This is utterly, utterly untrue - we know that rape and incest are some of the most under reported and under prosecuted crimes, and that the possibility of not being believed plays a big role in that.

    ***

    Finally finished. One star. You don't need to read this book.

  • Lenore

    What a load of self-indulgent, sexist codswallop.

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