Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

#1 New York Times BestsellerIn Furiously Happy, a humor memoir tinged with just enough tragedy and pathos to make it worthwhile, Jenny Lawson examines her own experience with severe depression and a host of other conditions, and explains how it has led her to live life to the fullest:"I've often thought that people with severe depression have developed such a well for expe...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things
Author:Jenny Lawson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things Reviews

  • karen

    my love for jenny lawson is NOT AT ALL creepy

    jenny lawson, i wanna make you blts and braid your hair. i am really shitty at braiding, and my fingers will be covered in mayonnaise after making you all those blts, so it will probably get a little messy and crazy, but it's the thought that counts!! and since your book is basically a manifesto of owning one's messy and crazy bits and alchemizing* them into comedy gold, we should be all set.

    this book is a little more personal that

    my love for jenny lawson is NOT AT ALL creepy

    jenny lawson, i wanna make you blts and braid your hair. i am really shitty at braiding, and my fingers will be covered in mayonnaise after making you all those blts, so it will probably get a little messy and crazy, but it's the thought that counts!! and since your book is basically a manifesto of owning one's messy and crazy bits and alchemizing* them into comedy gold, we should be all set.

    this book is a little more personal that

    ; a little more serious. that's not to say i didn't bust out into indelicate snort-guffaws many times while reading this, because i totally did, but in between all the laughter there's a lot of brave and honest stuff about managing mental and physical illness through anecdotes that are not at all humorous.

    and none of that is a criticism - i think it's astonishing how well she is able to write about her own obstacles; how clear-eyed she is in describing the debilitating emotional symptoms of disorders impossible for people who aren't fellow-sufferers to understand, while offering a platitude-free example to those who

    that yeah, you can live through this shit.

    she'd probably hate it that i'm calling her brave, but she is. it's not easy to share this much of yourself and unleash it into the world to complete strangers. and while i'm not on any medication, nor am i seeing a therapist, i still recognize a lot of myself in her stories. and maybe i'm not brave enough to elaborate on that, or maybe i'm just not comfortable suggesting that my problems are in any way comparable to hers, but i know a lot of people who will see themselves in this book, and that it will help them and make them laugh in equal parts. and i'm sure doctors would disagree with the adage that laughter is the best medicine, but it's not the worst. the worst is that antidepressant they advertise on teevee with the disclaimer about its side effects including depression and thoughts of suicide, because how is that helpful?

    so while it feels strange to say about a book so full of voodoo vaginas, dead raccoon rodeos, and japanese toilets - this is an important book. it just also happens to be really fucking funny.

    her late-night musings

    the wisdom she learned from her father

    her assessment of australia

    and her scoffing at bruce springsteen, dismissing him as "obviously not the boss of scientific accuracy."

    i mean, he's probably never even conducted any chameleon/skittles experiments.

    but it's her tales about how unfit she is for the adult world that were the most dangerous to my tendency to laugh-pee, particularly the chapter that involves her meeting with maury the financial planner and victor - aka mister jenny lawson.

    poor victor.

    poor victor.

    poor victor.

    all of this seems entirely sensible to me. and familiar. i don't like dealing with forms and grown-up things, either. and i like gum and cartwheels.

    poor victor also has to deal with her clutter of dead animals, her plans for a living cat/tax write-off called "the president," and her delightfully irrepressible spirit as the book's cover-model, rory the raccoon, sneaks up over victor's shoulder during business-related skype calls.

    lucky victor.

    i want a rory photobombing me, too.

    oh! dreams do come true!

    i just fucking love her - the parts where i can nod along: her boredom with financial matters, her fear not of

    but of

    to the plane, her anxiety over small talk and hiding when the doorbell rings, her love of cheese despite being lactose intolerant, and also the parts where i may not be able to relate, but i want to bake her a pie and try to make things better for her.

    although it seems as though she is finding her strength all on her own

    but this is a jenny lawson book, and i'm not going to close a review with something sedate and rational like that. should i quote a portion from her one-night-stand with a sleep clinic? or from the story containing the frantic exclamation

    ? or her realization that

    ?

    no, i will quote a passage from the appendix, which in the jennyverse is located in the middle of the book.

    when i die, i am leaving my body to jenny lawson, and she can stuff it and do whatever she wants with it. hopefully it will involve wings.

    maggie gets into it.

    sort of

    * j-law's not the only one who can make up words!

  • Felicia

    Upfront: I'm not very objective about this book because Jenny is someone I consider a friend (although we've only met once I think!) and I'm a huge fan of her blog, AND she blurbed my book. But I wouldn't have asked her to blurb if I didn't love her stuff, ergo it doesn't feel weird to say I loved this book. So take that how you will.

    This review is based on an ARC too, BTW. Basically her original book is one of my faves (I read it before I'd met her or even read much of her blog, for the record)

    Upfront: I'm not very objective about this book because Jenny is someone I consider a friend (although we've only met once I think!) and I'm a huge fan of her blog, AND she blurbed my book. But I wouldn't have asked her to blurb if I didn't love her stuff, ergo it doesn't feel weird to say I loved this book. So take that how you will.

    This review is based on an ARC too, BTW. Basically her original book is one of my faves (I read it before I'd met her or even read much of her blog, for the record) and these new tales are just as witty and weird and fantastic as in her book debut! You'll never feel ashamed of any aspect of yourself after you read this book. Jenny makes it ok to be you, whatever it is you feel that makes you weird or broken. I love her for that.

    Also, I'd never be able to sleep in her house because of all the taxidermy.

  • Patrick

    Earlier this year, I was one of the lucky people Jenny sent an Advance Reading Copy of her newest book to.

    The simple upshot? I loved it. I loved it even more than her first book, which I enjoyed so much that I bought multiple copies to give away as Christmas presents.

    The bad news is that my life is such a bloody shambles that I didn't get back to her in time for a gushy blurb to make it onto the back of her book. (Not that she particularly needed one from me. She's got Gaiman, Allie Brosh, and

    Earlier this year, I was one of the lucky people Jenny sent an Advance Reading Copy of her newest book to.

    The simple upshot? I loved it. I loved it even more than her first book, which I enjoyed so much that I bought multiple copies to give away as Christmas presents.

    The bad news is that my life is such a bloody shambles that I didn't get back to her in time for a gushy blurb to make it onto the back of her book. (Not that she particularly needed one from me. She's got Gaiman, Allie Brosh, and all manner of other fancy folk singing her praises.)

    Still, I loved the book. And when I love a book this much, I want to talk about it. I want to encourage people to read the book so that your lives will be dramatically embettered.

    I finished reading the book on an airplane, and I was so happy and weepy and amazed that I sent Jenny the following series of text messages:

    "Jenny, after a long delay, I've finally finished your book while flying. While it's still fresh in my mind, here are some Potential Blurbs for your book."

    "This Book made me laugh in a restaurant, it made me cry on an Airplane. It made me feel like maybe I'm not a total human trainwreck. It made me resolve to spend more time being furiously happy."

    "I wish Jenny Lawson was my neighbor."

    "This book is a good book and you should buy this book and read this book."

    "When I grow up, I want to be Joss Whedon. But if I don't have to grow up, I'd like to be Jenny Lawson instead."

    "Jenny Lawson is a force for good in the world."

    "When I finally give up on the world and retreat to the safety of my blanket fort, Jenny Lawson is on the short list of people who will always be welcome there."

    "If everyone was like Jenny Lawson, the world would be a better place. Also, a stranger, more surreal place, with more abundant opportunities to attend raccoon rodeos."

    "This is the best book I've read all year."

    So. Is this book worth your time? Yes. Absolutely yes. It's finally out, and if you don't buy it and read it, you are not living the best possible life.

  • Trudi

    I've shamelessly let Rocket Raccoon carry this review space since last year, and he garnered me 54 likes, so thanks Rocket! (I'm sure he would approve of my blatant exploitation even though he's the one being exploited).

    But enough is enough.

    I've shamelessly let Rocket Raccoon carry this review space since last year, and he garnered me 54 likes, so thanks Rocket! (I'm sure he would approve of my blatant exploitation even though he's the one being exploited).

    But enough is enough. And really, I'm sure Rory isn't too

    either about having some other fabulous raccoon steal his thunder. (And now Rocket is going to be pissed I've called him a raccoon. He doesn't like that).

    Jenny Lawson -- aka

    -- is a wickedly delightful, exhausting, a bit scary, kaleidoscopic array of frantic energy meets overwhelming anxieties and various anxiety disorders and sometimes .... debilitating depression. This book is her true confession, no holds barred everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask look inside her precious crazy head -- Jenny wouldn't mind me using the word crazy either; because she's taking crazy back. She's taking it out of the dark broom closet where we store things we don't want to see or talk about and wearing the "crazy badge" with pride. And why shouldn't she? Jenny, along with countless others, are

    -- of their pain, of their chemical imbalances, of their terror, and of their uncontrollable impulses.

    Because not everyone survives. My sister didn't. Depression and mental illness is terrifying. It's the disease we never talk about and as family and friends of sufferers we feel helpless in the face of it, not knowing what to do or say, or how to help. Sometimes in our effort to help, we're actually making things even harder, setting up unreasonable expectations, getting angry as if the person is acting this way on purpose just to piss us off. I really,

    wish my sister and I had had this book before it became too late for her. I'm not saying it would have changed the outcome, but

    it would have changed how I talked to her and how I tried to help her. I know it would have made her feel some solace, some comfort, that other people feel this crazy too, and that it's not something you just "get over." And it would have made her laugh, her big boisterous fuck you laugh.

    In all her silliness and shenanigans and stunts aimed to make us laugh (and keep herself furiously happy), Jenny Lawson is doing something really important here. She's humanizing depression and mental illness, she's reaching out and making it relatable (rather than something shameful and embarrassing). It's brave, and hopefully with shows like

    and Jared Padalecki's

    tackling the same difficult subject matter - we've reached a beginning of an empathy and acceptance for mental illness that will become our new normal.

    ************

    I love that the cover looks like a blissed out, meth-crazed Rocket Raccoon!

    (Pardon my squeeing giffiness but it had to be done).

  • C.G. Drews

    This book is

    And I believe I'm mildly shrieking right now because IT WAS JUST WHAT I NEEDED TO READ. It's about anxiety and depression, written in a really random and crazy and hyperbolic way -- and it was perfect. It was a

    . Usually books about anxiety (yes, I raise my hand as an anxietier [that is a word]) trigger me off...but this actually calmed me in a way? Because the author is so wonderfully messed up

    that it gave me a l

    This book is

    And I believe I'm mildly shrieking right now because IT WAS JUST WHAT I NEEDED TO READ. It's about anxiety and depression, written in a really random and crazy and hyperbolic way -- and it was perfect. It was a

    . Usually books about anxiety (yes, I raise my hand as an anxietier [that is a word]) trigger me off...but this actually calmed me in a way? Because the author is so wonderfully messed up

    that it gave me a lot of hope.

    This author is fabulous, btw. VERY MUCH SO.

    Okay so the first thing you need to know about this book is:

    The chapters don't always match. There are chapters on insomniac midnight thoughts which are JUST as random and nonsensical as you can imagine. It's not a feelsy good memoir about conquering all. It's just a

    And like a dozen other disorders. Her disorders have disorders.

    What I liked particularly about this book is that the author didn't refer to herself as "broken" all the time. I think she did once? And she called herself crazy a lot, which isn't my favourite. BUT. She didn't constantly say her mental illness ruined her life and made her into someone she hated...like she

    to be "furiously happy" despite her crappy disorders. And disorders ARE CRAPPY. But sometimes they also are a big part of you? And so calling a big part of you "broken/crazy" all the time is something I find demoralising. I'm not saying you gotta love having depression/anxiety. I'm just saying it's nice to love and accept yourself and deal with the rubbish BUT just go with it too?

    Also I love her "arguments" with her husband. This woman makes NO SENSE at times. And her husband basically reminded me of Spock...it is so hilariously wonderful. My sister and I argue like this

    .

    ALSO DID I MENTION HYPERBOLIC?!?! BECAUSE I LOVE THAT TO MUCH I CAN'T EVEN.

    + Her infatuation with taxidermy. I don't care if the animals died of natural causes. That freaks me out. Sorry not sorry.

    + the way she liked to purposefully make people uncomfortable. Okay, sure people might seem like uptight jerks to you or whatnot....but maybe they have a crappy life too? And I just hate it when spontaneously free people decide to make serious people uncomfortable for a laugh. That will never be okay, imo. (Yes I am a serious person.)

    It was very raw and honest and random and HILARIOUS. I snort-laughed several times quite flatteringly. (My dog was offended and left the room.) And I related a lot on the anxiety/depression stories and they way she summed up what it's like to have social anxiety was like "OMG FINALLY SOMEONE pUT IT INTO WORDS AND THOSE WORDS ARE EXCELLENT." I basically want to thank this book for existing. THANK YOU BOOK. <3

    *** Quotes I Loved ***

  • Raeleen Lemay

    Jenny talking about her mental illness was really impactful and well done, but the rest of this book didn't really work for me. It felt like she was trying too hard to be funny by throwing together random words to make the most strange sentences possible. This might just be how she always talks/writes, but I have never experienced her in any way so I wasn't prepared for that. I'll definitely give her first book a read/listen, and I sincerely hope it doesn't include the word "awesomeness" as much

    Jenny talking about her mental illness was really impactful and well done, but the rest of this book didn't really work for me. It felt like she was trying too hard to be funny by throwing together random words to make the most strange sentences possible. This might just be how she always talks/writes, but I have never experienced her in any way so I wasn't prepared for that. I'll definitely give her first book a read/listen, and I sincerely hope it doesn't include the word "awesomeness" as much as this one did.

  • Mariah

    I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    Jenny Lawson is a women I have never heard of, but by the end of the book I realized that she is famous because people loved her writing. Her writing is extremely honest, funny and can be very inappropriate. Jenny kept talking about dead animals, and from reading about her first book I realized that she was a daughter of a taxidermist and that was why. There were moments in this book that I wish I had read her first book first beca

    I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    Jenny Lawson is a women I have never heard of, but by the end of the book I realized that she is famous because people loved her writing. Her writing is extremely honest, funny and can be very inappropriate. Jenny kept talking about dead animals, and from reading about her first book I realized that she was a daughter of a taxidermist and that was why. There were moments in this book that I wish I had read her first book first because I didn't understand why or what she was talking about.

    Furiously Happy is a book written by Jenny to explore her lifelong battle with mental illness. It talks about how she has crippling depression and anxiety that prevents her from being able to live a "normal" life. Jenny tried explaining this by turning her mental illness stories into a hysterical, ridiculous book.

    My biggest struggle with this book was the randomness of it. The stories weren't organized and most of the chapters were just random thoughts thrown onto a page. She did have some funny moments, but the lack of organization really bugged me. I never felt the need to keep reading. This book didn't capture my attention.

  • Elyse

    Audiobook: 30-day trial with audible/Amazon.

    I had no intentions of 'reading' this book ( I didn't request it from Netgalley as an early read), but then I read several positive reviews. ( one said its a 'must' read for everyone).

    Plus, friends told me 'memoirs' by the author themselves, are good audiobook choices.

    So... what the heck: free trial read!

    The very beginning was great... ( out walking), I was ready to enjoy some laughs,

    wisdom, and inspiration...

    BUT SOON....

    I became exhausted, or bore

    Audiobook: 30-day trial with audible/Amazon.

    I had no intentions of 'reading' this book ( I didn't request it from Netgalley as an early read), but then I read several positive reviews. ( one said its a 'must' read for everyone).

    Plus, friends told me 'memoirs' by the author themselves, are good audiobook choices.

    So... what the heck: free trial read!

    The very beginning was great... ( out walking), I was ready to enjoy some laughs,

    wisdom, and inspiration...

    BUT SOON....

    I became exhausted, or bored with exaggerated stories.

    Jenny's high pitch voice and sarcasm - both - were annoying.

    The dialogue often felt forced ... or just plain silly.

    I've had this audiobook - less than a week-I'll exchange it!!!

  • Camie

    The manically happy raccoon amongst scattered glitter on the cover is the best part of this book. I find very little humor in mental illness, even when it's offered up by someone who doesn't seem to mind using her chronic depression and crippling anxiety as a vehicle to what she says are ridiculous stories. I agree with her word ridiculous. I guess it's good she can enjoy her mental illness, I'm quite sure most others would not find this possibility very doable.

    Is it wrong to feel this book mig

    The manically happy raccoon amongst scattered glitter on the cover is the best part of this book. I find very little humor in mental illness, even when it's offered up by someone who doesn't seem to mind using her chronic depression and crippling anxiety as a vehicle to what she says are ridiculous stories. I agree with her word ridiculous. I guess it's good she can enjoy her mental illness, I'm quite sure most others would not find this possibility very doable.

    Is it wrong to feel this book might be insulting to people who are devastated by mental illness ? Jenny Lawson has been blessed with a family who seem to have learned to deal with her flaunted craziness. KUYH November Select - 1 star

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.