Bridget Jones's Diary

Bridget Jones's Diary

Meet Bridget Jones—a 30-something Singleton who is certain she would have all the answers if she could:a. lose 7 poundsb. stop smokingc. develop Inner Poise"123 lbs. (how is it possible to put on 4 pounds in the middle of the night? Could flesh have somehow solidified becoming denser and heavier? Repulsive, horrifying notion), alcohol units 4 (excellent), cigarettes 21 (po...

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Title:Bridget Jones's Diary
Author:Helen Fielding
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Bridget Jones's Diary Reviews

  • Shriya

    Let's review this book the Bridget way!

    But wait a second! Who can call

    a chick-lit? That would be an insult to such a master-piece! No, Bridget is no wannabe chick-lit heroine and this book is certainly no trashy best-seller!

    is definitely a piece

    Let's review this book the Bridget way!

    But wait a second! Who can call

    a chick-lit? That would be an insult to such a master-piece! No, Bridget is no wannabe chick-lit heroine and this book is certainly no trashy best-seller!

    is definitely a piece of literature! It is well written, it's funny and it is extremely relate-able. Bridget, like most girls, tends to make mistakes, fall in love with the wrong guy and she gives an all new twist to the story of

    . In a way, it is a work of plagiarism and yet, it has the quality of being original! It is at once the biggest tribute to Austen and one of the most successful experiments on creating a story which has its own elements of uniqueness and surprise!

    And the best thing about this book is, you don't want to believe Bridget is not real! It's like Santa Claus or Hogwarts all over again!

    Yes, I know I can't stop gushing over it but trust me, had this book been anything like the usual chick-lits, I most certainly wouldn't have given it a five-star rating! Of course, I approached it gingerly and rather hesitantly at first but once I was done, I felt like banging my head against the wall asking, "Why didn't I read it before when I had the e-book lying with me for the last three years?"

    But I guess I had to borrow it from

    and then spend an entire fortnight gushing over it!

    Do I recommend it to you? Hell, yeah, I do!

  • Aishu Rehman

    Of course the book is all about Bridget's feelings and emotions..............it's a diary!! I think anyone, man or woman, would quietly admit to themselves the selfish thoughts they have when something terrible happens to someone they know, Bridget is just doing that in her diary. The book provides an excellent outlet for anyone woman who feels the pressures of impending singledom, rubbish careers and crazy parents and it makes the reader see that IT'S OK NOT TO BE PERFECT! We love Bridget 'cos

    Of course the book is all about Bridget's feelings and emotions..............it's a diary!! I think anyone, man or woman, would quietly admit to themselves the selfish thoughts they have when something terrible happens to someone they know, Bridget is just doing that in her diary. The book provides an excellent outlet for anyone woman who feels the pressures of impending singledom, rubbish careers and crazy parents and it makes the reader see that IT'S OK NOT TO BE PERFECT! We love Bridget 'cos she is fun, honest and finds true love even though she is (shock! horror!) average and has arse the size of Brazil. Obviously not for everyone but one of the best reads I have come across and a must for any single girl.

  • Jessica

    I didn't enjoy this book in an ironic way, or in a it's-good-even-though-, or I-can't-believe-I-do-but-I-perversely-can't-help-it or any other angled, roundabout, halfway indirect from behind kind of way.... No. I sat on my couch and wolfed this thing down in one sitting while laughing my ass off.

    I read it last spring when I decided I was curious about what "chick-lit" was, so that I could form an opinion and generally improve my likelihood of passing as a somewhat informed member of civilizatio

    I didn't enjoy this book in an ironic way, or in a it's-good-even-though-, or I-can't-believe-I-do-but-I-perversely-can't-help-it or any other angled, roundabout, halfway indirect from behind kind of way.... No. I sat on my couch and wolfed this thing down in one sitting while laughing my ass off.

    I read it last spring when I decided I was curious about what "chick-lit" was, so that I could form an opinion and generally improve my likelihood of passing as a somewhat informed member of civilization. This was not the only "chick-lit" book I attempted. I tried *Bergdorf Blondes*, the first few pages of which made me want to stab my eyes out with a rusty fork; well, maybe it made me more want to stab someone else's eyes out (Plum Sykes springs to mind), but my point is that it wasn't just bad but actually highly disturbing. Disturbing as in, does not so much shake as demolish one's faith in humanity and makes one tremble in horror at the times we're evidently living in..... I also tried *Good in Bed*, which wasn't upsetting, but did seem pretty bad, or at least definitely not for me. I even flipped open a *Shopaholic* book, which wasn't as awfully written as *

    * but did similarly make yearn for a grim Stalinist dystopia where this kind of trash just isn't permitted.

    Then there was Bridget Jones.

    Now, my enjoyment of this book was not uncomplicated by this terrifying "I-am-Cathy" feeling that I'm now enough of a grownup to identify with a lovably neurotic character from fluffy popular women's fiction. Because, dear bookster, identify I did. Yes. I had the 100% straightforward chick-lit experience, which I guess must be exactly this sense of recognizing your own ridiculously stereotypical feminine traits in a light novel's plucky heroine. And seriously? That's exactly what happened to me.

    (Can I just explain that I'm supposed to be packing right now, which is why this is getting so long and involved? I'm not really crazy, I'm just procrastinating.) (Also, though, I do want to tell you guys about Bridget Jones and how weirdly good it was.)

    There were a few things I didn't realize about BJ before I read this book. One is, she drinks too much. The other is, she smokes. I know it sounds dumb, but I think I would've felt differently knowing that, instead of just that she struggles with food. I'd sort of heard that a lot of it was about efforts to control her weight or whatever, and this typical, you know, on-again-off-again dieting, blah blah blah, and I really couldn't imagine anything less appealing, partly because that isn't a problem I identify with, and partly because does the world really need another book about a self-hating lady trying to lose weight? And why would anyone want to read something like that anyway?

    Well, I would. And I did! Because it's not really about her trying to lose weight (although I guess it kind of is), it's more about the constant, compulsive agony self-inflicted by a woman cursed not only with zero impulse control and a ravenous id, but also obsessively high standards for herself and a ridiculous amount of guilt and self-scrutiny about virtually everything she does.

    So yeah basically, this book is about me and a lot (not all) of my close female friends. And it really, really -- I want you to hear this from me -- truly gets at some stuff about certain ways that a lot of women tend to act and think, which, I'm sorry, all my fancy feminisms and gender theory aside, let's be honest, a lot (not all) of us are very crazy in some classically female ways, and Fielding just NAILS a lot of those. Plus she's very funny.

    Is this the greatest book ever written? No. But it was fun to read.

    Obviously, not all men act one way, and not all women act like Bridget Jones. However, I certainly do, and that must be the reason I got such a kick out of this book.

  • Manny

    Get up and make sensible plan. Will work hard on journal paper during day, then go for well-earned picnic at open-air movie theatre. Tonight's movie

    (v. good). Make salmon florentine for picnic, will eat half there and save rest for tomorrow. Feel v. organized.

    Hard to concentrate thoughts on journal paper. After lunch go back to bed, need to recover energy. Wake up again mid-afternoon. Decide to postpone working on paper until tomorrow, have to tidy apartment since guests c

    Get up and make sensible plan. Will work hard on journal paper during day, then go for well-earned picnic at open-air movie theatre. Tonight's movie

    (v. good). Make salmon florentine for picnic, will eat half there and save rest for tomorrow. Feel v. organized.

    Hard to concentrate thoughts on journal paper. After lunch go back to bed, need to recover energy. Wake up again mid-afternoon. Decide to postpone working on paper until tomorrow, have to tidy apartment since guests coming for picnic and place looks like tip. Pack picnic. Guests arrive, walk down to water and find good spot to pitch camp. While waiting for movie to start, eat all salmon florentine followed by large serve of chocolate mousse and most of two bottles of wine. Halfway through movie, stretch out hand to grope girlfriend and spill remaining wine over brand-new picnic rug (v. bad). Girlfriend not happy. Arrive back home pissed at 1 am. Must do better tomorrow.

  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at:

    Like so many others out there the holidays can sometimes get me feeling blah. Not like seasonal depression or can’t-get-out-of-bed kind of depression, more like just . . . . “meh.” In an effort to combat that, I do things like going balls out on Christmas decorating well before Thanksgiving, making giant Sunday dinners with all the fixins as soon as the leaves start to change in case I turn into a “please just go get Taco Bell” kind of

    Find all of my reviews at:

    Like so many others out there the holidays can sometimes get me feeling blah. Not like seasonal depression or can’t-get-out-of-bed kind of depression, more like just . . . . “meh.” In an effort to combat that, I do things like going balls out on Christmas decorating well before Thanksgiving, making giant Sunday dinners with all the fixins as soon as the leaves start to change in case I turn into a “please just go get Taco Bell” kind of Mom between Thanksgiving and the New Year and tipping the scales heavier than usual when it comes reading/watching things of the feel good rather than the stabby variety. Thus is the case with Bridget Jones and her diary.

    I’m not a big re-reader (but I am HUGE re-watcher). My family always knows I’m about to go spelunking in the basement for decorations as soon as I’ve watched

    (usually as close as possible to the day after Halloween) and it becomes hot cocoa, cookies, snuggly blanket and cozy reads season with the annual viewings of

    and

    . There’s just something about moments like these . . . .

    Oh and just in case you’re wondering if I’m a pod person, I assure you I’m not. In my world it’s not officially Christmas until this happens . . . .

    Greatest Christmas movie ever. Period.

    It seems ol’ Bridge is a fail for the newer generation. The only thing I can say is this is not a story that’s meant to be taken seriously so if you’re not in on the joke, it definitely won’t work for you. Put yourself in the mindset of geriatrics like me and Bridget . . . .

    Realize that Bridget’s inner dialogue regarding weight, alcohol and cigarettes is more of a “first world problem” type of confessional rather than an “I’m going to go stick my head in the oven because I’m a morbidly obese drunk with lung cancer and no one will ever love me” admission.

  • Annalisa

    I'm torn as to how to rate this. On the one hand, Fielding nails the humor. Humor is very hard to capture in literature and I often found myself smiling or chuckling. But when I wasn't, I was exasperated with Bridget Jones. Fielding nails her too. Why do women insist on being proud of being so... shallow? Idiotic, blind about themselves and their lives, and obsessed with all the wrong things in life? I didn't sympathize with Bridget at all, nor did I really care about the holes she dug herself i

    I'm torn as to how to rate this. On the one hand, Fielding nails the humor. Humor is very hard to capture in literature and I often found myself smiling or chuckling. But when I wasn't, I was exasperated with Bridget Jones. Fielding nails her too. Why do women insist on being proud of being so... shallow? Idiotic, blind about themselves and their lives, and obsessed with all the wrong things in life? I didn't sympathize with Bridget at all, nor did I really care about the holes she dug herself into. This book is the perfect example of why I don't read chick lit. I just don't relate to this definition of what women are. More than that, I'm embarrassed by it.

    I also didn't buy into the love story. I didn't really get why Bridget liked him other than he was there. But what else than a shallow love interest did I expect from Bridget? I'm glad that the Pride and Prejudice undertones were not blatant or I might of cried that Fielding so disgraced the characters. I liked the way Renee Zellweger played Bridget so much more than the way this is written. At least in the movie she has a brain and a personality worth something and she seems a little above all the nonsense around her. One of these days I'd like to read chick lit with a protagonist I can relate to, but then again, would it really be light and chick-lit-ish?

  • Yulia

    This certainly wasn't a novel but, what's worse, it wasn't even a credible diary. Who records their mishaps while cooking and running late in their preparations? Perhaps if this were written in the phone-texting age, I could imagine someone constantly chronicling their every move, no matter how pressing the situation or how inane and empty the commentary, but as it is, this book serves as a frightening precursor to a new generation of books with no established atmosphere, characters, dialogue, o

    This certainly wasn't a novel but, what's worse, it wasn't even a credible diary. Who records their mishaps while cooking and running late in their preparations? Perhaps if this were written in the phone-texting age, I could imagine someone constantly chronicling their every move, no matter how pressing the situation or how inane and empty the commentary, but as it is, this book serves as a frightening precursor to a new generation of books with no established atmosphere, characters, dialogue, or insight. Fielding would be better off looking into a crystal ball and telling people their fortunes than writing another non-novel.

  • April (Aprilius Maximus)

    Prepare yourselves, it's about to get personal up in here.

    So, I've never seen the movie of Bridget Jones's Diary, so I thought I would read the highly acclaimed book before doing so and, to my great surprise, I ended up hating almost everything about it. I 100% understand why people like it - it's funny and relatable and reminiscent of the great decade that was the 90's, but because of a purely personal problem, this book made me feel like garbage and therefore made me absolutely loathe my readi

    Prepare yourselves, it's about to get personal up in here.

    So, I've never seen the movie of Bridget Jones's Diary, so I thought I would read the highly acclaimed book before doing so and, to my great surprise, I ended up hating almost everything about it. I 100% understand why people like it - it's funny and relatable and reminiscent of the great decade that was the 90's, but because of a purely personal problem, this book made me feel like garbage and therefore made me absolutely loathe my reading experience.

    Bridget is always writing down her weight and saying she's fat, but the thing is, it's not just herself saying this. Friends, family and other characters also call her fat throughout the novel and then I look at me, who weighs over 15 kilos more than Bridget, and it honestly made me feel like crap. I have already been struggling with confidence and self-loathing because over the past couple of years I've put on 25 kilos due to changing medications for my mental health, so this book honestly just made it worse. Is this what people on the street think about me when I walk by? Do my friends and family secretly discuss how much weight I've put on behind my back? It honestly took me back to when members of my own family were making snide remarks about my weight or offering suggestions for how exercise and dieting could benefit me, thinking they were helping when really, it made it ten times worse.

    I was 3/4 of the way through the book, when I thought to myself, has anything plot-wise actually happened? Nope. Just a bunch of damaging self-hatred that triggered my own.

    I get that a lot of people love the book and that's fine, I totally get it, but for me, it ended up being a damaging and destructive novel that ended up being quite triggering for my depression.

    Let me know any thoughts you guys have on this book or any of the things I've discussed!

    Around the Year in 52 Books Challenge Notes:

    - 20. A book with a first name in the title

  • Joey Woolfardis

    Read as part of

    , based on the BBC's Big Read Poll of 2003.

    Let me introduce you to the Béchamel Test. No, not the Bechdel Test, that's different. And not the sauce, either.

    The Béchamel Test is a very simply checklist to see if you should read a book or simply set fire to it. Here's how it works:

    1.) Is There A Gay Best Friend?

    2.) Are There Moments When The Main Character Would, If The Book Was Set In The Current Time Period, Do Something Awkward and Say, "Awk

    Read as part of

    , based on the BBC's Big Read Poll of 2003.

    Let me introduce you to the Béchamel Test. No, not the Bechdel Test, that's different. And not the sauce, either.

    The Béchamel Test is a very simply checklist to see if you should read a book or simply set fire to it. Here's how it works:

    1.) Is There A Gay Best Friend?

    2.) Are There Moments When The Main Character Would, If The Book Was Set In The Current Time Period, Do Something Awkward and Say, "Awkward" Out Loud Afterwards In An Incredibly Irritating Faux American Accent With A Hint Of Irony But No Clue As To What Irony Actually Is?

    3.) Is The Protagonist Selfish, Deluded, Thinks 9st Is Overweight, Doesn't Think Maybe A Bit Of Exercise Would Help Pretty Much Every One Of Their Problems, Not Care About Anything Except Men And Thinks That's Fine, But Can't Stand The Idea of Marriage And Kids, (But Secretly Wants That), Hates Anyone Who Is Happy, Thinks Feminism Is Just Acting Like A Man (Wouldn't Want To Be Thought Of As Delicate Now Would We)?

    4.) Is The Book Purported To Be Funny But Isn't And Is Just A Weird Way For People To Be Mean About Past Generations Without Actually Saying Anything Specific?

    If you answered "Yes" to any of those then the book has failed the Béchamel Test and should be burnt. At once. Don't bother leaving the bookshop; ask them to help.

    And go and spend your money on some actual Béchamel Sauce.

    P.S. Also failed the Bechdel Test and the one that uses a needle on a metre to determine whether a noise was heard after a joke was made.

    P.P.S. (no noise was heard).

    P.P.P.S. Read as part of the Infinite Variety Reading Challenge based on the BBC's Big Read poll of 2003.

    P.P.P.P.S. Just watch the film.

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