We Should All Be Feminists

We Should All Be Feminists

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed TEDx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun. With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the...

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Title:We Should All Be Feminists
Author:Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
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Edition Language:English

We Should All Be Feminists Reviews

  • tysephine

    I want to just buy a crate of these and pass them out to strangers and friends and family.

  • Kai
  • Emily May

    A short, sharp, and effective essay about gender, the wrong ideas many people have about feminism, and why it is so damn important. Even today.

    I suppose an "essay" doesn't sound like something m

    A short, sharp, and effective essay about gender, the wrong ideas many people have about feminism, and why it is so damn important. Even today.

    I suppose an "essay" doesn't sound like something most people want to rush out and read. It sounds like a chore, like hard work, like something that you should maybe read... someday... if you ever get around to it. But this doesn't feel like an essay at all. The author delivers a compelling and deeply personal account of her experiences and the experiences of her friends - male and female, young and old, Nigerian and American.

    She makes many fantastic points and makes them in a conversational tone, without seeming preachy or patronizing. Looking at the way we treat women and men, and how the expectations we have of both genders is contributing to a gender divide, the author makes an argument for a better future where we are not put into gendered boxes.

    I've actually written a little about this in the past, but I especially like the way she draws attention to the importance of the word itself. Many people are quick to say: "I absolutely believe men and women should be equal, but why call it feminism? Isn't that word exclusive? Why not say humanism (as many people do)?" Even I've been guilty of wondering the same in the past.

    I think there are many great arguments for why it should be "feminism" and not just "humanism", "black lives matter" and not just "all lives matter", "gay pride" and not just "sexual pride", but I'll let Adichie do the talking on that issue. She summarizes it marvelously.

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  • Lola

    Anyone with a heartbeat should read this essay, even aliens.

  • Riley

    This should be required reading

  • Bookdragon Sean

    This is the single most convincing essay I’ve ever read on feminism. It does not point fingers and blame men for a cultural mind-set they were born into. Instead, it offers calm logical arguments for positive change going forward. And that’s what the world needs:

    Adichie states that the strongest feminist she ever knew

    This is the single most convincing essay I’ve ever read on feminism. It does not point fingers and blame men for a cultural mind-set they were born into. Instead, it offers calm logical arguments for positive change going forward. And that’s what the world needs:

    Adichie states that the strongest feminist she ever knew was a man, and that’s kind of important. This is an essay about building bridges; it appeals directly to men and asks them to look at the world differently: it ask them to look at their actions, ones which were harmless and indirect, but were nevertheless sexist: it tries to make them open their eyes.

    Gender is the key. Adichie gives an example of how when she first became a teacher she wore male orientated clothing on her first day. She wore a suit so the students would take her more seriously rather than just dressing in a way that made her comfortable. She sacrificed her individuality because of gender expectations. In order to be more authoritative she dressed like a man because a woman would not have had as much respect in such a situation. And that’s truly sad.

    The same is true for men who feel unable to express their emotions because such a thing is considered weak and unmanly. We all have the capacity to feel and the fact that fiery emotions are considered a feminine trait is just, well, odd. But that’s the world we live in. Adichie proposes that we ignore such stupid labels and be whoever we wish to be: we are ourselves.

    There’s so much negative stigma attached to the word feminist. This book is the true face of modern feminism, read it and you will not be able to fault its logic.

  • jessica

    this. this. a thousand times this!

    this essay has never been more relevant, important or necessary. it is a wonderful introduction to feminism and its growing purpose in todays society. however, it is just an introduction, as the brief length only allows for adichie to concisely outline what feminism is

    this. this. a thousand times this!

    this essay has never been more relevant, important or necessary. it is a wonderful introduction to feminism and its growing purpose in todays society. however, it is just an introduction, as the brief length only allows for adichie to concisely outline what feminism is and why it is important. but the topic itself is one that could fill tomes. and i have never read a statement that so efficiently and passionately describes the struggle for gender equality.

    this book is a call to action, one that every human should be willing to answer.

  • Nat

    — Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,

    .

    is a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from the much-viewed

    of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

    Which I have, not so coincidentally, watched numerous times— so much so that I have come to learn and preform the speech alongside her.

    The modified book version of the talk was a very quick and important read that, like the talk, will stay with me for a long time (especially all the beautifully

    — Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie,

    .

    is a personal, eloquently-argued essay – adapted from the much-viewed

    of the same name – by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

    Which I have, not so coincidentally, watched numerous times— so much so that I have come to learn and preform the speech alongside her.

    The modified book version of the talk was a very quick and important read that, like the talk, will stay with me for a long time (especially all the beautifully poignant quotes):

    Also, I found

    * to be really fitting with the subject.

    (* I featured it in

    .)

    Overall, I was truly impressed with

    and hope to read more from the author.

    ,

    Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with

  • Zoë

    A short, insightful essay about a topic I am incredibly passionate about: feminism. I was practically nodding my head the entire time as so much of what was brought forth hit home.

    However, I had a few issues with heteronormative and cisnormative language. I don't believe she was being intentionally exclusionary, so I'm interested to read her newest feminist essay in the near future!

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