Paper Chains

Paper Chains

A heart-warming story of love, friendship and forgiveness - and the crazy twists of fate that shape our lives…Hannah and India are new best friends. Although true friendship means always telling each other the truth, doesn’t it…?Hannah, you see, is running from her life back in Sydney. Now in London, she’s trying to put the past behind her, and finding this amazing new fri...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Paper Chains
Author:Nicola Moriarty
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Paper Chains Reviews

  • Lauredhel

    for

    Oh, this book. This book. It shattered me into tiny pieces. And not from what you who've read it already might expect.

    for

    Oh, this book. This book. It shattered me into tiny pieces. And not from what you who've read it already might expect.

    The book starts deceptively light, though it is rapidly revealed that both of the main characters have secrets. Two young Australian women meet by chance in London, and strike up a friendship. As their secrets are slowly explored, we sink deeper and deeper into the mire of Hannah's secret. India's story seems cheerier.

    At the heart of this book lies an unlikely coincidence, a deep female friendship, and a core of hope and love, and I'm a sucker for that every time. I'm already a huge fan of Nicola Moriarty, and will definitely be picking up her next book.

  • Nomes

    Paper chains has so much cool going for it:

    Set in London! And Australia :) and other snippetty travel scenes and flashbacks.

    Two mysterious girls (ladies) both holding secrets. What is going on?

    Those gorgeous moments of serendipity that I adore.

    Chain letters.

    Prose that you sink Ito, sentiments perfectly captured.

    Most ever so importantly, characters to care about. To get under your skin. Two gorgeous girls, so different. And all their worlds (including their sexy, at times, estranged men) and fami

    Paper chains has so much cool going for it:

    Set in London! And Australia :) and other snippetty travel scenes and flashbacks.

    Two mysterious girls (ladies) both holding secrets. What is going on?

    Those gorgeous moments of serendipity that I adore.

    Chain letters.

    Prose that you sink Ito, sentiments perfectly captured.

    Most ever so importantly, characters to care about. To get under your skin. Two gorgeous girls, so different. And all their worlds (including their sexy, at times, estranged men) and family.

    It also has bone crushing moments of absolute despair. At times, I felt it was hard to breathe, smothered with the weight of it. Paper Chains tackles some very real, and very depressing issues. But Moriarty would bring flashes of whimsy and the shyest of smiles to lighten the load.

    There were moments of silliness and absolute charm. Flashbacks to the cutest and sexiest of meet-cutes (crazily love that Luna park scene). And then there was complete devastation and broken-heartedness of the kind that you are not sure anyone can ever really recover from.

    There's a rare moment where I go from being cocooned in a fictional story and soaking it up, to suddenly realizing I have completely placed myself in the story and am crying right alongside the characters. This book didn't just include certain issues, it feels like the author poured her soul and ever fibre of her emotions into bringing Hannah's feelings to the page. It was, at times, unrelenting and eye opening. It kind of ripped me wide open.

    Now for the cheesy confession: I don't like to wax poetic about reading being therapeutic or whatever. I honestly read because I happen to love reading, but Paper Chains went above and beyond and I felt so liberated, so affirmed after finishing. From things I didn't even realize I was holding onto. Failures or perceived failures. Secret thoughts and pressures. Doubts and expectations. I just felt like everything is okay, is going to be okay, and life is good. Those final chapters with Hannah were just perfect. And India, just LOVE.

    I am sorry to be cryptic but I don't want to spoil anything in any way.

    I so thoroughly enjoyed this book. It had the perfect little addictive pull that my favourite reading experiences require. It had so much emotion and heart and just the perfect amount of whimsy. It had characters I am still buzzing about and I will, for sure, be revisiting it again soon and passing my copy onto all my fave reading buddies, who I only pass the absolute best books on to :)

    Paper Chains is on my favourites list for 2013 and my favourites list for always.

  • Shelleyrae at Book'd Out

    I was charmed by Nicola Moriarty's debut novel,

    and I have been looking forward to the release of Paper Chains. This wonderful contemporary adult novel reveals the secrets of two young Australian women, India and Hannah, who meet while in London.

    The deceptively lighthearted introduction to Paper Chains slowly gives way to a compelling tale of heartbreak, loss and hope.

    As backpacker India considers her next travel destination, she chooses to befriend the shy and fragile Hannah, seei

    I was charmed by Nicola Moriarty's debut novel,

    and I have been looking forward to the release of Paper Chains. This wonderful contemporary adult novel reveals the secrets of two young Australian women, India and Hannah, who meet while in London.

    The deceptively lighthearted introduction to Paper Chains slowly gives way to a compelling tale of heartbreak, loss and hope.

    As backpacker India considers her next travel destination, she chooses to befriend the shy and fragile Hannah, seeing her as "...an opportunity, a new project - someone to fix, someone to save" but in truth, Hannah is a distraction for India whose open facade hides heartbreaking secrets of her own.

    Hannah is drawn to India's confidence and warmth, despite being uncomfortable with accepting her attention. Her life in England is a self administered punishment and friendship offers her solace she doesn't feel she deserves.

    With careful timing and sensitivity Moriarty reveals Hannah's painful secret, one that saw her flee Australia for London, hiding in a grimy flat and punishing herself for her regrets. It focuses on an issue that surprised me for a number of reasons, though none I can reveal without inadvertently giving too much away, and is explored with compassion by the author.

    Hannah's palpable misery distracts from India's own secret - one that is drifting around the world in the form of a letter addressed simply to Simon, The Aella, a journey we follow in between chapters of the story. There are hints that not all is as it seems with India, from her conflicted feelings about the aforementioned Simon to her determination to rescue Hannah and I was probably more prepared for India's shocking secret than Hannah's, but that doesn't lessen the impact of tragedy, even though it is tempered with hope and love.

    Written with compassion and genuine insight, Paper Chains is a poignant tale of friendship, family and forgiveness that will touch your heart. Fans of Monica McInerney, Cecilla Ahern and Anna McPartlin should embrace Nicola Moriarty, and expect more great things to come from this talented author.

  • Brenda

    Hannah had recently arrived in London from Australia, and fairly quickly found herself a job at the gift shop in a Museum…she wanted to work every day, but her boss insisted she have at least one day off. But when she had that day off, she punished herself by jogging, running everywhere. Beside the Thames, down the sidewalks and between the cafes. She ate very little, told herself she needed the punishment, that she was a bad person and didn’t deserve anything that would give her happiness.

    At a

    Hannah had recently arrived in London from Australia, and fairly quickly found herself a job at the gift shop in a Museum…she wanted to work every day, but her boss insisted she have at least one day off. But when she had that day off, she punished herself by jogging, running everywhere. Beside the Thames, down the sidewalks and between the cafes. She ate very little, told herself she needed the punishment, that she was a bad person and didn’t deserve anything that would give her happiness.

    At a shift one day, a toddler was throwing a tantrum and Hannah froze…she broke out into a sweat, and didn’t know what to do. When the young, stressed Mum was rescued by a total stranger, a young woman who calmed the toddler down very cleverly, much to the bemusement of onlookers, Hannah wished she was like her. She oozed confidence and charm, seemed to be full of life.

    On Hannah’s next day off, while running through a nearby park, she spotted the same young woman on a rug on the grass, and was totally startled when she called out to her. Hannah hesitantly went over, and that was how she met India. But Hannah didn’t stay long…she had no idea what to say to India, and she was terrified of becoming friendly with her..

    India had a gut feeling that Hannah needed help, so she decided to make it her job to find out what was wrong, and fix it. She was a people person, and with her friendly nature, always seemed to know when someone was hurting, when someone needed a friend.

    But it seemed India also had a secret! Who was Simon that she kept writing to, but never posted the mail? What was devastating Hannah so much? What had she done that was so shocking? And what was India’s secret…why did she move from one place to the next after only a few weeks?

    This book was my first by Nicola Moriarty, and I really enjoyed it! A little suspense, a little mystery along with some romance…a great combination which worked extremely well!

    I would definitely recommend this novel.

    Many thanks to NetGalley for my copy.

  • Bree T

    Hannah is living in London, working all the days she can in a gift shop when she meets India. Hannah is amazed by India’s ability to go up to anyone she sees, introduce herself and become their friend. It’s been a long time since Hannah had a friend, but it seems like India is going to fulfill that role.

    Both are Australian and both have found themselves in England for quite similar reasons. India knows that Hannah is hiding a secret. There’s a reason why Hannah is so withdrawn from life. She wor

    Hannah is living in London, working all the days she can in a gift shop when she meets India. Hannah is amazed by India’s ability to go up to anyone she sees, introduce herself and become their friend. It’s been a long time since Hannah had a friend, but it seems like India is going to fulfill that role.

    Both are Australian and both have found themselves in England for quite similar reasons. India knows that Hannah is hiding a secret. There’s a reason why Hannah is so withdrawn from life. She works 6 days a week and when she’s not working, she’s running, punishing herself by running all day long. India is determined to get to the bottom of Hannah’s mysterious behaviour and get her to spill her secret. But as time goes by, Hannah seems to resist the powerful allure of India and India begins to wonder if she can fix Hannah after all.

    Hannah is on the run and she doesn’t want to think about what she’s left behind and she doesn’t want to talk about it either. She doesn’t deserve sympathy or help. She deserves punishment of the worst kind for what she has done. Unbeknownst to Hannah, India has a secret too. She’s left behind a wonderful man in the Greek Islands, to keep up her bohemian, traveling lifestyle and Hannah can’t understand why, especially as India seems so affected by it. India writes letters to the man she left behind but she doesn’t post them – she puts them in the hands of other backpackers, other travelers and hopes that they make their way back to him. If they do, then maybe, just maybe, its meant to be. India has taken a huge risk and written down her big secret. Now its time to see if its going to reach its destination.

    Before she can move on, India has to help Hannah make an important decision and start her on the path to forgiveness of herself. And in return, Hannah might be able to help India find her own way to happiness.

    Paper Chains is the second novel from Nicola Moriarty and it’s every bit as enjoyable and a roller-coaster of emotion as the first. When we meet Hannah, she’s in London, alone. She has no friends, hasn’t met any people and she knows nothing but work, cheap unappetizing food and running to punish herself. Hannah is filled with guilt and self-loathing because she has run away. It’s well clear what Hannah has run away from before it is revealed within the story – the reader sees it coming before Hannah herself does as she flashes back. It’s a heartbreaking situation for Hannah – I ached for her when I read what she was going to. I consider myself so blessed that I didn’t struggle the way in which she did (oh I struggled in plenty of other ways though!) but I know people that have. I think it would be too easy to judge, or blame someone in Hannah’s situation. But this novel takes an in depth look at her frame of mind, her disconnection, the way that she felt and how that was the only option for her at the time. There were clearly other options, but Hannah wasn’t ready to acknowledge her need for them until later. I don’t want to give too much away about what she’s running from (people who read the book will guess for themselves) but I do want to applaud the way in which it is portrayed. There’s so much pressure these days – to do things a certain way, to fit in, to juggle everything with ease. And when you can’t, that’s a crushing feeling of failure. And there’s judgement everywhere – judgement in every decision you make and every failure, real or imagined. And Hannah imagines a lot.

    For all of Hannah’s crippling self-hatred and guilt, India by contrast, is light and energy. She makes everything seem easy to Hannah – meeting people, becoming friends with them, caring about them. Hannah isn’t sure why India has decided to become her friend and she doesn’t make it easy for India either. But India persists, her desire and ability to fix other people hiding a secret about herself. India mourns the man she left behind and she sends him letters, but not by post. Her thinking is that if they get to him, then she’s meant to see him again. But if they don’t, well then that’s the way things are meant to be. India is seeing the world, traveling light, meeting people, exchanging stories and absorbing as much as she can.

    Goddamn I loved this book. Nicola Moriarty does grief and hope in equal amounts so well. I always tend to look upon a novelist’s second book with interest – it can be a difficult exercise, especially when the first one has been successful and well received. I really loved Free Falling, Nicola’s first novel and I think I might even like this one just a fraction more. It made me cry (more than once actually) but it was that sort of cathartic cleansing sort of cry where you’ve become so invested in the characters that you’re caught up in their journey and feel what they do. There’s lots of humour and hope in here too as well as some sad moments and they made me want to cry too sometimes. I was so immersed in this story and the characters that the leap of faith “small world” wasn’t hard for me to make and often I am that person who can’t believe the coincidences in a book. But when it’s written well and the stories really make you feel, then you can buy into anything and believe that things were meant to be this way for a reason. I especially loved the idea of the way that India was sending her letters – passing them around, like a chain letter, trusting fate that they’d get to the person she intended.

    Highly recommended.

  • Kathy

    I highly recommend this beautiful and moving story. Paper Chains is about two Aussie girls who meet in London – both have secrets (which does get a little frustrating at times, but does keep the pages moving to find out what they are!) . This story delves into some really tough issues but I loved it all – the friendships and family, and the journey that brings it all to a heartbreaking ending. 5 stars for sure……what a talented author!

  • Helen McKenna

    Hannah is not your usual twenty-something Australian living in London. Unlike the thousands of other travellers and working holidayers that make the city home for a time while they party their way around Europe, Hannah spends her nights alone in her flat and her days off jogging all over the city to the point of exhaustion. By a stroke of fate she meets fellow Aussie India, who is as outgoing and funloving as Hannah is serious and reclusive. Although an unlikely friendship it flourishes and enri

    Hannah is not your usual twenty-something Australian living in London. Unlike the thousands of other travellers and working holidayers that make the city home for a time while they party their way around Europe, Hannah spends her nights alone in her flat and her days off jogging all over the city to the point of exhaustion. By a stroke of fate she meets fellow Aussie India, who is as outgoing and funloving as Hannah is serious and reclusive. Although an unlikely friendship it flourishes and enriches the lives of both the young women in amazing ways.

    It doesn't take long for India to work out that Hannah is hiding a secret and she makes it her mission to discover and get it sorted out - after all in her own words "everything is fixable". In the meantime India is dealing wtih her own matters of the heart. Although she has adopted a "here for a good time not a long time" attitude to travel and the people she meets along the way, India can't stop thinking about Simon who she met in Greece and continues to correspond with via an unorthodox method that sees her letters hand transported via other travellers. Yet a secret of her own keeps her from following her heart and committing to a relationship with him.

    Although written in a style that is very engaging and easy to read Paper Chains has a lot of hidden depth, exploring a few difficult subjects with sensitivity and compassion. Through the characters of Hannah and India, Nicola Moriarty demonstrates that nobody is immune to difficulties of some kind in their life - even if they outwardly appear to have it all together.

    Moriarty's characterisation of Hannah and India is fantastic and the way she introduces them in such a light-hearted way works really well. At first Hannah's constant berating of herself is a little bit grating, but as you come to know her better and the reasons for her self loathing are revealed this aspect fades away.

    A delightful blend of suspense, poignancy, romance and well-placed humour, Paper Chains is a fabulous read that demonstrates Nicola Moriarty will be a continuing presence in the literary world.

  • Paula Weston

    I ordered this book at the library after reading Nomes' fabulous review on Inkcrush. I'll admit, when I took a closer look at the cutesy cover, I thought the library had wrongly marked it as adult fiction, because it definitely had a YA vibe (and while I'd read the synopsis and knew the story appealed, I obviously didn't read it enough to realise it wasn't YA).

    I should know better: don't judge a book by its cover. The nature of the relationships and emotional struggles are definitely for an olde

    I ordered this book at the library after reading Nomes' fabulous review on Inkcrush. I'll admit, when I took a closer look at the cutesy cover, I thought the library had wrongly marked it as adult fiction, because it definitely had a YA vibe (and while I'd read the synopsis and knew the story appealed, I obviously didn't read it enough to realise it wasn't YA).

    I should know better: don't judge a book by its cover. The nature of the relationships and emotional struggles are definitely for an older audience, and Nicola Moriarty handles her story in a way that brings together a difficult issue with unexpected moments of serendipity.

    I enjoyed getting to know Hannah and India, drawn in by their respective mysteries and what it is they're running from. And when the truth about each is revealed, their stories - and that of their families/other halves - become even more compelling. There were moments of honesty that resonated with me and I was well and truly caught up in the emotion of the final chapters.

    Paper Chains tackles themes of friendship, family, forgiveness and twists of fate in a way that's original, with a subtle Australian flavour. I found it hard to put down.

    For a far more articulate review, check out Nomes' here:

  • Phrynne

    A short, light and enjoyable read about two women with big secrets. Overall I enjoyed the story but occasionally felt irritated by how long it took to discover what the secrets were. In the meantime Hannah in particular became increasingly exasperating with her melodramatic statements and actions. So much so that by the time I discovered her problem - which was indeed a serious one - I did not have much sympathy left for her. India on the other hand was much more likable and was just totally mix

    A short, light and enjoyable read about two women with big secrets. Overall I enjoyed the story but occasionally felt irritated by how long it took to discover what the secrets were. In the meantime Hannah in particular became increasingly exasperating with her melodramatic statements and actions. So much so that by the time I discovered her problem - which was indeed a serious one - I did not have much sympathy left for her. India on the other hand was much more likable and was just totally mixed up by something beyond her control.

    The conclusion was achieved through a series of massive coincidences but that was okay. It was romantic and sad and there were some tearful moments. A good book for a rainy Saturday afternoon.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.