Leaving Everything Most Loved

Leaving Everything Most Loved

In Leaving Everything Most Loved by New York Times bestselling author Jacqueline Winspear, Maisie Dobbs investigates the murder of Indian immigrants in London. The year is 1933. Maisie Dobbs is contacted by an Indian gentleman who has come to England in the hopes of finding out who killed his sister two months ago. Scotland Yard failed to make any arrest in the case, and t...

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Title:Leaving Everything Most Loved
Author:Jacqueline Winspear
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Leaving Everything Most Loved Reviews

  • Kathryn

    I would give this six stars if I could. It is wonderful that this being the 10th in the Maisie Dobbs series and each book has been as captivating and well written as the one before. I do think

    and the first in the series

    are my favorite. If read in order the background on Maisie and those important in her life are well developed. Maisie brings a sense of calm to me while I read. I want to savor each page, and sometimes I reread a paragraph again just to

    I would give this six stars if I could. It is wonderful that this being the 10th in the Maisie Dobbs series and each book has been as captivating and well written as the one before. I do think

    and the first in the series

    are my favorite. If read in order the background on Maisie and those important in her life are well developed. Maisie brings a sense of calm to me while I read. I want to savor each page, and sometimes I reread a paragraph again just to take it all in. Now the hard part is waitng for the next book as I hope there is another one. Maisie has moved on with much to discover and much to decide.

  • Suzanne Chapman

    I am a huge Maisie Dobbs fan and I think this is the author's best so far. In all of the 10 Maisie Dobbs books, Winspear does not shy away from controversial subjects and does so with balance and thoughtfulness. This particular book deals with the murder of an Indian women in London. Her brother comes to London in the hopes of finding out who killed her and why and hires Maisie because he feels Scotland Yard has dropped the ball. I had the pleasure of hearing Jacqueline Winspear speak in Cambrid

    I am a huge Maisie Dobbs fan and I think this is the author's best so far. In all of the 10 Maisie Dobbs books, Winspear does not shy away from controversial subjects and does so with balance and thoughtfulness. This particular book deals with the murder of an Indian women in London. Her brother comes to London in the hopes of finding out who killed her and why and hires Maisie because he feels Scotland Yard has dropped the ball. I had the pleasure of hearing Jacqueline Winspear speak in Cambridge last night and she talked about how she came to write this story and what it actually means to be an outsider.

  • Marianne

    Leaving Everything Most Loved is the tenth book in the Maisie Dobbs series by British-born American author, Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs, psychologist and private investigator, is engaged by (former) Sergeant-Major Pramal, of India, to investigate the murder, some two months earlier, of his sister, Usha, a governess living in London. Scotland Yard have made no progress with the case, so Maisie’s team have a challenge ahead of them with this cold case. When Maisie visits the ayah’s hostel wh

    Leaving Everything Most Loved is the tenth book in the Maisie Dobbs series by British-born American author, Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs, psychologist and private investigator, is engaged by (former) Sergeant-Major Pramal, of India, to investigate the murder, some two months earlier, of his sister, Usha, a governess living in London. Scotland Yard have made no progress with the case, so Maisie’s team have a challenge ahead of them with this cold case. When Maisie visits the ayah’s hostel where Usha had been living, she gets the impression that the couple running the supposedly charitable institution are not quite what they seem, and before Maisie can speak to her privately, Usha’s friend and fellow lodger, Maya Patel is murdered in the same manner: shot between the eyes and found in the nearby canal.

    Maisie’s assistant, Billy Beal is back in the job, but apparently not completely recovered from the attack that hospitalised him: his distraction affects his investigative abilities. Maisie takes over the case of a missing boy and a chance remark by DI Caldwell has her wondering if their two cases are linked. But Maisie is distracted too, by her burgeoning desire to travel overseas in her mentor’s footsteps. It seems that Usha Pramal was well loved, for her personality and her healing powers. As Maisie investigates, all manner of possible suspects present themselves. Maisie wonders if jealousy or a case of mistaken identity are the answer, or was there some sort of racial motivation? Or is it all about love? Winspear once again gives the reader a plot with plenty of twists and turns. She touches on the plight of Indian ayahs abandoned far from home; shell shock and mixed marriage also feature. The final chapters ensure that future books in the series will be quite different. Another excellent read.

  • Suzy

    This is a favorite series and I really liked the story told in this installment (#10!). An Indian woman is killed and months later Maisie is engaged by Scotland Yard no less to solve the mystery. They had neglected the case until the woman's brother showed up in London to find out how his sister was killed and why there was no progress of finding the murderer. Maisie's seeming nemesis at the Yard, Inspector Caldwell, comes to her to take on the case believing that she

    This is a favorite series and I really liked the story told in this installment (#10!). An Indian woman is killed and months later Maisie is engaged by Scotland Yard no less to solve the mystery. They had neglected the case until the woman's brother showed up in London to find out how his sister was killed and why there was no progress of finding the murderer. Maisie's seeming nemesis at the Yard, Inspector Caldwell, comes to her to take on the case believing that she will be more successful than they. And guess what? She is! 4 stars for the story and the way it is told.

    My mixed feelings come from something that bugs me about Winspear's approach to writing these mysteries. She feels compelled to tell us much about what has transpired in past books. For me, this gets in the way of enjoying the present story when she is filling in irrelevant blanks from previous stories. She is not the only mystery writer who does this (

    anyone?) and it bugs me in other series as well. 3 stars for this annoying aspect of Maisie Dobbs mysteries.

    In an afterward, Winspear explains how she came to her interest in the "ayah's hostels" in London during this time period. I enjoyed learning about this sub-culture that developed from maids who came to England when a British family returned from India and who were subsequently turned out with nowhere to go. Learning about post WWI society in Great Britain is one of the things I like most about this series.

  • Cornerofmadness

    After the deep disappointment of the last book, I was hesitant to get this book and I’ll admit, it was hard to rate. The mystery gets a solid three stars; Maisie’s personal life barely rates a two. I enjoyed the mystery but the overwrought personal stuff left me cold.

    The mystery: Usha Pramal’s brother believes the police did a poor job investigating his sister’s murder and even detective Caldwell reluctantly admits this might be true. Usha had left India to be governess to an English family. Som

    After the deep disappointment of the last book, I was hesitant to get this book and I’ll admit, it was hard to rate. The mystery gets a solid three stars; Maisie’s personal life barely rates a two. I enjoyed the mystery but the overwrought personal stuff left me cold.

    The mystery: Usha Pramal’s brother believes the police did a poor job investigating his sister’s murder and even detective Caldwell reluctantly admits this might be true. Usha had left India to be governess to an English family. Somehow she ended up turned out and living in a house with other ayahs and doing odd jobs as she saved money to set up a school for underprivileged girls in India. And then someone shot her in the head.

    As Maisie starts to investigate, she can’t find the Allison’s whom Usha had come to England with as they are currently abroad. The house where Usha lived is more promising. It’s run by a religious couple who don’t let their beliefs get in the way of them bilking the otherwise homeless Indian girls out of most of their wages and forcing them to church with Reverend Griffith who has a strange branch of Christianity going. Maisie also learns that Usha was very touchy feely and we’re never sure but does she have therapeutic touch or Ayurvedic healing medicines; either way she’s making more money doing that. Her friend, Maya, was willing to meet with Maisie but soon after is also shot in the head.

    Maisie has to confront that after Billy’s head damage in the beating last book, he’s not the same man. He’s quick to anger and doing a very poor job of investigating and she has to pick up the trail of a missing young boy. However, she starts to see intersecting threads between the cases but are they real or imagined.

    Overall the mystery wasn’t bad. Usha was a bit too much of a Mary Sue, so much so that Maisie at the end is reminding people she was just a good woman and not a goddess on a pedestal. The rest, however, is a mess. I was wondering if this would be the last book. She has all the drama of trying to find Billy a different job but oooo am I overstepping my boundaries dilemma again and again. Then is Sandra and Billy having an affair? Well it’s none of her business as we’re reminded of too often. As for poor James Compton, Maisie claims to love him, refuses to accept him working with John Otterburn (see last book for why) and he’s going to Canada for a while and wants her to marry him so we get the will she/won’t she crap ad nauseam and it doesn’t even get resolved.

    But the worst of the melodrama is Maisie wants to go exploring. Okay, fine but she makes such a huge deal of it. She wants to follow her mentor Maurice’s footsteps, you know, instead of being original. Oh where oh where shall I go? How long will I stay? Honestly, I didn’t give a damn. All it did was take away from and drag down the mystery. And then her answer to how to go about this almost made me toss the book across the room. I’m no Priscilla fan but she had it right when she pointed out all the stupidity of this move to Maisie. And if I want to know how it turns out I have to get the next book. Sigh. This series used to be so much better.

  • Phrynne

    This was not one of the best books in this series so far. Much too much introspection on Maisie's part made the book slow and occasionally dull.

    On the plus side the mystery was quite good and I was rather surprised when the identity of the murderer was revealed. It was a little disappointing though that Maisie had a 'too stupid to live' moment, challenging the murderer on her own and having to be rescued by the cavalry in the form of a dog, Billy and a number of policemen.

    I like the fact that Ma

    This was not one of the best books in this series so far. Much too much introspection on Maisie's part made the book slow and occasionally dull.

    On the plus side the mystery was quite good and I was rather surprised when the identity of the murderer was revealed. It was a little disappointing though that Maisie had a 'too stupid to live' moment, challenging the murderer on her own and having to be rescued by the cavalry in the form of a dog, Billy and a number of policemen.

    I like the fact that Maisie has closed her detective agency and is heading off into pastures new. Hopefully this will give us some variety and a new direction for future books.

  • Marci

    I don't know why I keep reading Maisie Dobbs mysteries, I really don't. Maisie is one of the most annoying protagonists that I can't leave alone, and I can't even figure out why, really. On the good side, there is always a good and properly devious mystery to unravel. This book was no exception. The author's research is impeccable. The writing style is good.

    On the downside I think Maisie has become too much--much, much, MUCH too much! She comes from the lower classes and has made her way unreal

    I don't know why I keep reading Maisie Dobbs mysteries, I really don't. Maisie is one of the most annoying protagonists that I can't leave alone, and I can't even figure out why, really. On the good side, there is always a good and properly devious mystery to unravel. This book was no exception. The author's research is impeccable. The writing style is good.

    On the downside I think Maisie has become too much--much, much, MUCH too much! She comes from the lower classes and has made her way unrealistically high up the social ladder so that she's living the life of an upper-class, educated, modern woman, but she's still uneasy about it. She has lost her mentor and spends quite a lot of time fighting the impulse to "fix" everybody's lives for them. Then she spends quite a lot of time dithering about her future and worrying about how her choices will impact everybody around her, but she seems to have no trouble making the most selfish of plans. So the author conveniently has everybody fall into the roles and plans Maisie has "not" fixed for them, curiously aligning their lives perfectly with Maisie's own plans for her life. I would have liked to see nothing go her way and watch the real wrenching when she decides to do what she wants anyway. As it is, Maisie is one of the most spoiled women anywhere, and she doesn't seem to have to pay for it. She talks about her heart breaking, but it's described within a few sentences and then she's recovering quickly. I am considerably annoyed. But I will probably keep reading the series! Why? I guess I like the ambiguity of it all.

    Update, May 2018: I have kept reading the series and it has been an extremely rewarding choice! Hang in there with Maisie. She goes through realistic growth stages and is fascinating to watch. Besides, the mysteries are among the best I've found.

  • Nancy

    Pros - no obsessing/description over her dreary clothes and her hair, and even wore a lovely dress James bought for her. Woohoo!

    Cons - was she eating soup nearly every night? There was a cook in the house and maybe James likes more than soup.

    Pros - her Billy guilt subdued; that damn case she had for so long is no longer discussed (it was covered in blood in #6?); and that damn nurse's watch isn't mentioned repeatedly either.

    Cons - minor pointless subplot with Sandra; her father was virtually inv

    Pros - no obsessing/description over her dreary clothes and her hair, and even wore a lovely dress James bought for her. Woohoo!

    Cons - was she eating soup nearly every night? There was a cook in the house and maybe James likes more than soup.

    Pros - her Billy guilt subdued; that damn case she had for so long is no longer discussed (it was covered in blood in #6?); and that damn nurse's watch isn't mentioned repeatedly either.

    Cons - minor pointless subplot with Sandra; her father was virtually invisible; poor, patient James - he doesn't deserve this treatment; "pee or get off the pot, Maisie".

    Maisie is thinking about India and maybe she should go and re-trace Maurice's steps, and then has a mystery concerning the murder of an Indian woman. She channels, she revisits the same people several, several, SEVERAL times. Then she ties up loose ends and says good-bye for about 20 pages, and it was still not very emotionally satisfying.

    Pros - the book is over; I borrowed it from the library.

    Cons - I still feel sorry for James; I am worried that there might be another book squeezed in before James' March 31 deadline to Maisie.

    Oops! Was that a spoiler?

  • Donna

    Maisie debates making a big change in her life while investigating the months-old murder of an intriguing Indian woman.

    This mystery is meatier than the one from the previous installment, though it didn't feel any more satisfying. Maisie continues to baby step through the personal side of the story.

    I can't help thinking that those around her deserve better. It also annoys me that, while she flouts convention and drags her feet in equal measure, she faces little in the way of real disapproval bey

    Maisie debates making a big change in her life while investigating the months-old murder of an intriguing Indian woman.

    This mystery is meatier than the one from the previous installment, though it didn't feel any more satisfying. Maisie continues to baby step through the personal side of the story.

    I can't help thinking that those around her deserve better. It also annoys me that, while she flouts convention and drags her feet in equal measure, she faces little in the way of real disapproval beyond the occasional token mention of how odd a lady detective may seem. Maisie's decisions seem to lead mostly to guilt or awkwardness rather than any external consequences.

    These books have always been slow and introspective, but there used to be a quiet, driving passion to them. While the prose is as pretty as ever, they now feel bloodless and almost dull.

    Maisie's finally moving toward her future, but it could be too little too late for my taste. There's a good chance that I'm going to stop here and just pretend that, after receiving word that Maisie was been eaten by a tiger, James has a whirlwind romance with a dashing young aviatrix who, unlike her predecessor, can allow herself to be happy.

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