The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye

The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye

How many hours are in a day when you don't spend half of them watching television?When is the last time any of us REALLY worked to get something we wanted?How long has it been since any of us really NEEDED something that we WANTED?The world we knew is gone.The world of commerce and frivolous necessity has been replaced by a world of survival and responsibility.An epidemic...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye
Author:Robert Kirkman
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Walking Dead, Vol. 1: Days Gone Bye Reviews

  • Delee

    Ohhhhhhhhhh Yeah- I'm hooked!

  • Carol

  • Lola

    This is so, so, so, so good. It doesn’t try to be disgusting and it doesn’t mainly focus on the zombies, surprisingly. It’s more about the little community of survivors and their relationships, their helping each other out, their trying to find a way out of this pit of death. I felt desolate to see some characters gone too soon or left behind, but I have some hope of seeing new ones in the future that will make me stop missing the departed ones.

  • Alejandro

    Writer: Robert Kirkman

    Illustrators: Tony Moore

    Additional gray tones to inking: Tony Moore

    This chapter is the epic beginning of the mega popular franchise of

    that first was comic books, then expanded to a TV series and now there are even pros

    Writer: Robert Kirkman

    Illustrators: Tony Moore

    Additional gray tones to inking: Tony Moore

    This chapter is the epic beginning of the mega popular franchise of

    that first was comic books, then expanded to a TV series and now there are even prose novels.

    This first chapter has the great artwork by Tony Moore that certainly made it iconic. The work of Charlie Adlard in the rest of chapters is really good too, specially on the details of things and backgrounds, but definitely if I’d be able to choose, my pick would be on Tony Moore, it was sad that he won’t keep doing the illustrations on the rest of the comic book series. As additional info, Tony Moore remained in the creative team for a while doing the covers of the first twenty-four issues and the covers of the first four regular TPBs.

    A good thing about

    , if you want to enjoy it in comic books along with TV series is that both storylines are different, sure there will be connecting points here and there, and you will meet the same names of characters (in some cases) but they aren’t the same persons, and trust me, while this is my first compendium in the comic book’s storyline, I have been watching the TV series since its own beginning, and both stories are different, both truly great, but different, so don’t afraid of spoilers in any of both formats, since the events are developed quite different. You may think of the “other storyline” of any format, comic books or TV series, as “the road not taken”.

    But truly loyal to the spirit of the franchise.

    Officer Rick Grimes, from the Sheriff Deparment in Cynthiana, Kentucky, suffers a shot injury on duty and he falls into a coma. When he wakes up in a hospital bed, after several weeks, he finds himself alone in the building, or at least he thinks that he is alone. Soon enough he meets several “things”, walking “things” that only a word, not matter how nonsensical it sounds, is able to describe those walking “things”...

    ...

    .

    And if things aren’t bad enough, Rick doesn’t know the whereabouts of his wife and son!

    So, his first priority is to reunite with his family as soon as possible.

    Rick’s first stop on his own home leads him to meet Morgan and his son, Duane. Morgan explains him how the world gone to hell while Rick was in coma.

    The US Government was asking population to go to big cities to be defended there by the army, and since Lori, Rick’s wife, has family in Atlanta, Rick decides to go there to search for his wife and son, Carl.

    On Atlanta, he finds Glenn, an Asian-American young man, who explains him how the world works now.

    Rick Grimes’ world would never been the same anymore!

  • Anne

    I get it, I get it!

    I'm

    , too. In fact,

    I get it, I get it!

    I'm

    , too. In fact,

    I've never seen the show (

    ), so I don't know how this compares to it.

    Seemed like a fine start for a story about the zombie apocalypse, though.

    Personally, I liked that the undead hordes were all pokey and sluggish. It was a nice switch-up from the new Turbo-Zombies that seem to be zipping around here nowadays.

    There's a lot of meaningful things that Days Gone Bye explores.

    Life lessons, morality lessons, blah, blah, blah.

    But what struck me as

    , didn't have anything to do with the real-life metaphors that Kirkman played with in this thing.

    What

    impressed me, was that a seven year old kid made a NECK Shot!

    Seriously?!

    Do you have any idea how hard that would be? Especially from his lower vantage point!

    So.

    The

    moral of the story is that you need to teach your kids how to handle guns. Preferably, as soon as they can toddle.

    ["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Stephen

    4.0 stars. You can see by the ratings and the other reviews of this book that a lot of people think very highly of this series and it is certainly justified. This is the kind of excellence in both writing and art that make the graphic novel an incredibly power medium when it is done well. Here….it is done very well indeed. The writing and the art are superb and I don’t think you could ask for better.

    Basically, the set up is very familiar. It is a zombie apocalypse, society has broken down and t

    4.0 stars. You can see by the ratings and the other reviews of this book that a lot of people think very highly of this series and it is certainly justified. This is the kind of excellence in both writing and art that make the graphic novel an incredibly power medium when it is done well. Here….it is done very well indeed. The writing and the art are superb and I don’t think you could ask for better.

    Basically, the set up is very familiar. It is a zombie apocalypse, society has broken down and the walking dead control the cities with bands of humans living in the outskirts trying to survive. I think that is enough background for you to understand the basic premise of the series.

    Therefore, rather then do a detailed plot synopsis which others have done very well, I thought I would mention 3 things (beyond the aforementioned writing and art) that I really thought set this series apart from your typical zombie/undead apocalypse story.

    The creators of this story have started with an impossible, unbelievable premise and yet from there have done their best to make the reader forget that we are dealing with science ficiton. They have imbued the story with a very realistic tone and the actions and inactions of the characters in the story felt authentic.

    While the zombie’s in this story are very important and provide a great “danger” this story really focuses on the lives of the survivors and how the breakdown of society can affect people differently. The character development is excellent and the emotional resonance is stronger than you typically see in this kind of story.

    One thing that really struck me while I was reading this is that I found myself feeling sorry for the zombies. I think this was something intentional on the part of the creators. For example, there is a scene early on when Rick is leaving the hospital and there is a female zombie that has here lower body crushed and basically can’t move (I haven’t seen the TV show…yet…but I think this is the woman from the show):

    Her body is emaciated and yet she can’t die (presumably for quite a long time). She is just lying there moaning and unable to move. She looked...pitiable, at least in the story.Later on Rick sees this same zombie again and she is in the exact same spot and you can tell it makes him sad.

    There are similar scenes throughout the book including this…

    Here, Rick and a boy are sneaking into town to try and find more guns and they come across this scene…all of the zombies you see are “alive” (i.e. zombie alive) and yet many of them are trapped and can’t really move. I found this aspect to be very compelling and added an additional layer to the dread of becoming one of these creatures. I thought the writers did an excellent job in this respect.

    Overall, I was very impressed with this first volume and plan to continue reading the series. Well written, well constructed plot with believable characters and an engaging storyline. As far as I was concerned, the story was only missing two things that would have made it perfect:

    But that's just me...and I'm a GUY...and I refer you back to the first picture.

  • Bookdragon Sean

    He’s resourceful too, a real survivor. When other members of the fledgling group are panicking and running around like headless chickens, he acts. When they argue about the next move they should take or which option is safest, Rick, again, acts. He doesn’t mess about. You’ve got to give it to the small town sheriff, he quickly realises what he must do to keep his family alive. And it isn’t p

    He’s resourceful too, a real survivor. When other members of the fledgling group are panicking and running around like headless chickens, he acts. When they argue about the next move they should take or which option is safest, Rick, again, acts. He doesn’t mess about. You’ve got to give it to the small town sheriff, he quickly realises what he must do to keep his family alive. And it isn’t pretty. Surviving a zombie apocalypse is no glamorous business. In this first volume, he covers himself with zombie remains to avoid detection in the vast hoard of the undead. By doing so he demonstrates how far he is willing to go protect his family. Guns are everything in this new world, and walking incognito through the hoards is worth the risk if it means a few more firearms around camp.

    A lot can be said about Rick from these early issues. From the way he handles the unhinged Shane; to the way he allows his seven year old sun to carry a handgun. He realised very early on how bad things were going to get, and he knew how to respond. Everyone else is still clutching to old world ideas; they are trying to live in the past and use the same set of customs. But, the world’s gone to hell. And, at this point, it seems Rick’s the only one fully aware of this fact. Without him, the group would collapse. The man knows what’s on the horizon. I think his encounter with Shane is pivotal because through it he learns what could happen to him, and what is likely to happen to everyone if they’re not careful.

    It’s a perfect foreshadowing of a possible rise in character insanity. I think because of it Rick has to up his game. He takes charge and begins to make the necessary decisions. More importantly, though, for the rest of the group, he dons the face of optimism. He becomes their source of strength. I think I’m going to really enjoy reading through these; it will be interesting to see how it compares to the television show. Already I’m noticing how sanity, and an ability to cope, is being explored much more in these earlier parts of the story. The show picks the idea up much later. Dale is also a much more established character in these comics. This is going to be a fun reading experience.

    More Walking Dead Reviews to come!

  • Nat

    This review contains

    for both the tv show (season 1 &2) and the graphic novel.

    I absolutely loved the first two seasons of

    , so I decided why not give the comic books a chance. And I was not disappointed.

    This volume brought back so many memories of the show for me and reminded me of just how much I loved it— even with the jump scares.

    But

    doesn’t only focus on the gore of killing zombies, it also explores how people deal with extreme situations a

    This review contains

    for both the tv show (season 1 &2) and the graphic novel.

    I absolutely loved the first two seasons of

    , so I decided why not give the comic books a chance. And I was not disappointed.

    This volume brought back so many memories of the show for me and reminded me of just how much I loved it— even with the jump scares.

    But

    doesn’t only focus on the gore of killing zombies, it also explores how people deal with extreme situations and how these events CHANGE them.

    It was certainly interesting looking back at how Rick started on his journey and how much he has changed and matured since.

    But a lot of beloved old characters reappeared:

    (GLENN!! CAROL!! ANDREA!! )

    Oh, and Shane also appeared which reminded me of how much I

    him (always a fun reminder).

    But then Carl shot him, which astonished me, considering that in the tv show it doesn’t happen till much later.

    And I don’t remember a Donna from the tv show, but I wholeheartedly agreed with what she brought up:

    (I did not like Lori in this story.

    .)

    And I almost forgot how gruesome some scenes can be in

    , especially when they went on the hunt for guns in Atlanta:

    (I had to take a breather after that part.)

    But it was interesting seeing how different the pace is compared to the tv show—that’s mainly why I quit after season 5, the pace was too damn slow.

    And yet this kind of made me want to continue watching the show?? But if I don’t, I’ll still continue on to volume 2 in this series (I hope sooner rather than later).

    ,

    Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with

  • Jon

    I wanted to really like volume one of

    . Most people do like it. They like it a lot. I didn't, which doesn't make anyone better or smarter than anyone else, we just have different tastes.

    I appreciate

    wanting to write a social commentary and not just a horror story, but I don't know that he needs to state this in the introduction - all good zombie (and horror) stories are dealing with more than just the surface material, so Kirkman emphasizing his social commentary s

    I wanted to really like volume one of

    . Most people do like it. They like it a lot. I didn't, which doesn't make anyone better or smarter than anyone else, we just have different tastes.

    I appreciate

    wanting to write a social commentary and not just a horror story, but I don't know that he needs to state this in the introduction - all good zombie (and horror) stories are dealing with more than just the surface material, so Kirkman emphasizing his social commentary sounds more like him trying to convince everyone his stuff is smart and deserving of our attention and praise; why not let his graphic novel prove its merit on its own?

    I didn't feel that the character development was that deep. The greatest transgressor here was Lori, who is very one-dimensional. She's the most incompetent woman in the whole story. To me, she is just the whining wife character who tries to frustrate Rick's chivalric heroism by not wanting him to go to the city, or she's the over-protective mother figure who doesn't want their son, Carl, to be taught how to shoot a gun (silly women, not letting their boys become men). She's helpless, submissive, and mostly just obnoxious.

    I didn't feel that Kirkman explored some of the issues of survival very thoroughly. For example, gender issues and the division of labor is raised when some of the women are going to wash the clothes. But the issue is opened by Donna's shallow complaints about women doing the washing and men doing the hunting. Her argument is bland and Lori's response is equally so, she claims it "isn't about women's rights . . . it's about being realistic and doing what needs to be done." This is a convenient response to shut down Donna, who is very obviously constructed as a whining, judgmental character (we're not supposed to agree with her, but are supposed to discard her opinion as rapidly as Lori does). The problem is that if you're wanting to survive in the apocalypse (or if you just wanna be able to live in our regular supposedly non-apocalyptic life), everyone should be learning as many skills as possible. Kirkman has the opportunity to examine gender roles here, but chooses to reduce the issue to a series of bumper sticker statements that don't really say anything.

    This becomes even more of a problem for me when later the women are taught how to shoot. After the argument over who washes and who hunts, it seems silly that women are expected to learn so-called "manly" skills like shooting a gun but men are allowed to remain ignorant to washing clothes. It's a man's world, zombies or no zombies. Obviously, women should learn how to shoot to protect themselves and to catch food, but domestic chores are also important for survival and the men should learn those too. Is this a small detail I'm picking at? Perhaps. But it happens so often in our culture and our stories that it really annoys the hell out of me. And I don't think this is the characters being ignorantly sexist, I think it's Kirkman being ignorantly sexist.

    Another instance of cheap dramatics used to show Lori's helplessness and Kirkman's lame gender use is following the laundry washing when the women are attacked by a zombie and Dale beheads it with his axe. The zombie's head is still "alive" which logically means they have to shoot the head to kill it, even though Dale is holding his axe and we see many zombies dispatched with axes and hatchets (including right before this moment when Rick kills the zombie feeding on the deer with his hatchet). Using the gun to kill the head is a lame move, creating bland dramatics to get Rick and Shane to come running back to camp, where Lori cries on Rick's shoulder, completely beside herself with fear - "Oh, God, Rick . . . it was awful." This isn't interesting or exciting, it's an attempt to make a story exciting because the more action, the more cool the story, the more readers.

    Gender studies issues aside,

    just moves too quickly a lot of the time. A story focusing on the day-to-day challenge of surviving in a blighted landscape should dwell on the monotony of survival, at least some of the time. Kirkman wants the story to drag along and take its time, but it just felt rushed to me. It's like he wanted to have dead time where not much was happening, but then got bored with it and just rushed us on to the next zombie scene where we can be thrilled by Tony Moore's grisly art - mundane chores don't sell stories, but violence does.

    Moore's art is pretty good, especially the zombies. But this is an emphasis again on grotesque body horror and violence. There are lots of close-ups of heads getting hacked at and shot. The gore abounds and while that isn't always a bad thing because we are reading a fantasy and zombie stories are a violent, nasty subject, I wonder if Moore was a bit too enamored with killing things.

    As I said, I wanted to like this graphic novel, but in the end it was just okay. It coulda, shoulda been brilliant and there are nice moments and signs of real quality. But the effort to make it stellar proved too difficult, so Kirkman and co. chose the much easier, safer route of superficiality.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.