Kiss the Girls

Kiss the Girls

In Los Angeles, a reporter investigating a series of murders is killed. In Chapel Hill, North Carolina, a beautiful medical intern suddenly disappears. In Washington D.C. Alex Cross is back to solve the most baffling and terrifying murder case ever. Two clever pattern killers are collaborating, cooperating, competing - and they are working coast to coast....

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Title:Kiss the Girls
Author:James Patterson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Kiss the Girls Reviews

  • TAYLOR

    Good luck trying to put this one down after starting it. From start to finish this book will have you sweating with anticipation of whats to come. James Patterson does a great job of putting realistic characters in believable situations that will have you on the edge of your seat i guess you could say.

    The story is about a detective named Alex Cross who is called on to try to find two notorious serial killers. Patterson describes them as twin killers. But are they really related? You will enco

    Good luck trying to put this one down after starting it. From start to finish this book will have you sweating with anticipation of whats to come. James Patterson does a great job of putting realistic characters in believable situations that will have you on the edge of your seat i guess you could say.

    The story is about a detective named Alex Cross who is called on to try to find two notorious serial killers. Patterson describes them as twin killers. But are they really related? You will encounter some of the most grusome and horrific murders. The story has another twist to it. Cross's niece goes missing from her college campus. Now the investigation is personal.

    This book is quick read and one worth reading. If you like constant excitement this is the book for you. This book will not disappoint!

  • Phrynne

    Okay I am getting hooked on Alex Cross and may now have to read this series straight through. I really enjoy the pace of these books, the way each short chapter jumps straight to the next so the reader has no opportunity to put the book down. I read this one in one day staying up far too late in order to finish it and loved every minute of it. There is a lot of violence against women in it - that is its main theme after all since the murderers are insane rapists! So if that kind of stuff offends

    Okay I am getting hooked on Alex Cross and may now have to read this series straight through. I really enjoy the pace of these books, the way each short chapter jumps straight to the next so the reader has no opportunity to put the book down. I read this one in one day staying up far too late in order to finish it and loved every minute of it. There is a lot of violence against women in it - that is its main theme after all since the murderers are insane rapists! So if that kind of stuff offends you then do not read it. Otherwise I recommend Alex Cross to anyone who enjoys a good murder mystery.

  • James Lafayette  Tivendale

    I received an ARC of Kiss the Girls via NetGalley and I would like to thank James Patterson, Random House UK, Cornerstone and Arrow. Although this is a well-known classic thriller, first released in 1995, a new version with that strikingly awesome cover is being published on 29 June 2017. Kiss the Girls is the second outing featuring detective and psychologist Alex Cross and it follows on from the excellent Along Came A Spider.

    The story starts with Alex arriving home one day to find a houseful

    I received an ARC of Kiss the Girls via NetGalley and I would like to thank James Patterson, Random House UK, Cornerstone and Arrow. Although this is a well-known classic thriller, first released in 1995, a new version with that strikingly awesome cover is being published on 29 June 2017. Kiss the Girls is the second outing featuring detective and psychologist Alex Cross and it follows on from the excellent Along Came A Spider.

    The story starts with Alex arriving home one day to find a houseful of crying relatives. The reason being that his niece Naomi has gone missing whilst she is away from the family studying law in Carolina. They are shocked and devastated of course. To make matters more complex, this is not an isolated incident. This has happened to at least six attractive, intelligent women recently so the police are suspecting a serial kidnapper. As this is personal, Alex talks his way from Washington D.C. to Carolina where he aligns himself with the local force and the FBI investigating these mysterious disappearances which have left no evidence or even the smallest lead.

    Kiss the Girls includes familiar characters that are frequent throughout the series such as Alex's partner, the "Man Mountain" Detective John Sampson and also his FBI contact, Special Agent Kyle Craig. I really enjoyed reading more about these characters as well as about Alex himself. Similar to the majority of these thrillers, we are introduced to new highly interesting and deep characters such as the "two killers" and a female student Doctor and karate expert, Kate.

    The action switches between Washington D.C and Carolina. The novel flows at breakneck speed and the chapters are always short, sharp and precise keeping the action intense and gripping. Alex does what he does best which is trying to get into the minds of these notorious "monsters" to try and find a trail that shed some light of these horrific happenings. I have read approximately six Alex Cross novels and my experience throughout these books, Kiss the Girls included, is that Patterson does compose some gruesome and upsetting scenes including rape and murder so this is not for the lighthearted.

    I don't want to divulge any real details about the plot or the direction this book takes. When I read, I always try and predict what will happen. Kiss the Girls was so hugely unpredictable that I didn't bother trying to guess but just buckled myself in so I could enjoy the journey. Apologies for the cliche, but the narrative is like an intense roller coaster. It plummeted my mind in one direction, then there was a twist, then I thought a certain revelation was awesome only then to realise I was blind sighted and things weren't as they seemed at all. It leaves you slightly disorientated but in a great way. As Alex's parts are in the first person, I emphasised with his distress and confusion at certain points as it tries to solve this case yet, I was also given a real buzz when something unraveled in Alex's favour and when his deductions proved fruitful. The other characters are presented in the third person which means that we have a complete view of everything that is happening and are with Alex when he puts the pieces of the puzzle together to try and rescue his niece, amongst the other missing ladies. To call this a thriller is an understatement. This is my favourite Alex Cross book so far and I can't wait to read Cat and Mouse next and complete the series chronologically. (I have already read Jack and Jill before anyone states that I have the order wrong lol!) Highly recommend.

  • Joel

    This is genuinely the worst book I have ever finished.

    To be fair, it is tolerable when there is action, which is often. But every time James Patterson tries to put words coming out of a characters mouth, it makes you want to punch yourself in the face. When he writes descriptive, emotional paragraphs, it makes you want to punch him in the face.

    I actually dog-eared a couple pages because the writing was so bad, I wanted to be able to quick reference it to people to show them how bad it was.

    Want a

    This is genuinely the worst book I have ever finished.

    To be fair, it is tolerable when there is action, which is often. But every time James Patterson tries to put words coming out of a characters mouth, it makes you want to punch yourself in the face. When he writes descriptive, emotional paragraphs, it makes you want to punch him in the face.

    I actually dog-eared a couple pages because the writing was so bad, I wanted to be able to quick reference it to people to show them how bad it was.

    Want another example of how bad a writer he is? One of his other books is called, "Night of the Machete." I am not a God-fearing man, but if you believe in God, maybe throw in an extra prayer for James Patterson's English language murdering soul.

  • Visha

    If this is what some people consider beach reading, they should drown themselves.

    If I could scrub clean that part of my brain where the stench of this novel resides, I would. While Patterson probably applauds himself for coming up with something as clever as an underground lair and the device of two serial rapist/murderers working together, every other aspect of this book (I have to call it a book, which is a four-letter word and refers to something that is written but can also be used as a door

    If this is what some people consider beach reading, they should drown themselves.

    If I could scrub clean that part of my brain where the stench of this novel resides, I would. While Patterson probably applauds himself for coming up with something as clever as an underground lair and the device of two serial rapist/murderers working together, every other aspect of this book (I have to call it a book, which is a four-letter word and refers to something that is written but can also be used as a doorstop) is goofy, stupid, and formulaic. Two things are very clear: (1) Patterson thinks Duke is the only university in the piedmont (uuuuuuuugh) and (2) he can’t write a love scene – in fact, I’ve never been so turned off by the written words of love. Ever.

  • Lisa (Harmonybites)

    If it weren't for two scenes in this novel, I'd add two stars. Patterson is no prose stylist, and his novels are formulaic, but until a few novels after this one Alex Cross got unbearably Gary Stu, with supervillain psychopaths making it their life work to take him down, I found Patterson's detective protagonist likable and the books featuring him entertaining page-turning police procedurals.

    In some ways, this second book book in the series is even stronger than

    , the first Al

    If it weren't for two scenes in this novel, I'd add two stars. Patterson is no prose stylist, and his novels are formulaic, but until a few novels after this one Alex Cross got unbearably Gary Stu, with supervillain psychopaths making it their life work to take him down, I found Patterson's detective protagonist likable and the books featuring him entertaining page-turning police procedurals.

    In some ways, this second book book in the series is even stronger than

    , the first Alex Cross novel. In this one, Cross becomes involved when his niece is kidnapped, and he believes it's a case of "twinning" where two serial killers are cooperating and competing on two coasts--"Cassanova" and "The Gentleman Caller." Cross teams up with a victim of Cassanova, Kate McTiernan, who escapes his lair only to find it's seemingly

    . The forensic psychology is more to the fore in this novel, the hunt suspenseful, the twists clever. Moreover, Kate in a lot of ways is an appealing, kick-ass heroine--a survivor who does everything to save herself, not just wait passively for rescue.

    What mars this is that when I think of this novel, I think of two scenes in particular, and it's

    a good memory. One is the rape of Kate by Cassanova. The other is the anal rape of another woman by Cassanova--using a live snake. Yes, you read that right. I went back and looked to make sure I was remembering the right novel. There it is in Chapter 54. Three paragraphs burned into my retinas.

    The thing is I can see the rationale for both scenes. One to show Kate's resilience and bravery, so that we understand what she underwent. The other so we understand just what kind of monster Cross is dealing with in Cassanova.

    But those scenes are so graphic, so explicit, to me they come across as pornography of the kind the two serial rapists are said to read and relish--

    and

    among others named. The scenes overwhelm the story as well as repel.

    Rape in fiction is a chancy thing. I'm not saying it should never be used. It's too often part of life, history, crime--but it's rarely done effectively and isn't done well here but comes across as a cheap attempt to titillate and shock.

  • Andy Deemer

    Alex Cross is a cop. A damn good cop. He's 6'3" tall, taut with muscles, and strikingly handsome. He's a doctor, too. A damn good doctor. A psychologist to the slum kids. His washboard stomach gleams in the afternoon light, as he plays Nora Jones and Coltrane on his piano, stroking his children's heads with his other arms. The phone rings, and he wonders if it's the FBI again, offering him that job running the DC police. He lets it ring again, and again, and again. He really doesn't have time fo

    Alex Cross is a cop. A damn good cop. He's 6'3" tall, taut with muscles, and strikingly handsome. He's a doctor, too. A damn good doctor. A psychologist to the slum kids. His washboard stomach gleams in the afternoon light, as he plays Nora Jones and Coltrane on his piano, stroking his children's heads with his other arms. The phone rings, and he wonders if it's the FBI again, offering him that job running the DC police. He lets it ring again, and again, and again. He really doesn't have time for the FBI. Because he's a damn good father, too.

    What utter, utter, utter trash.

    As in "Like Water For Elephants," every character in this Mills & Boon spinoff action novel is beautiful, perfect, confident, doubt- and flaw-less, cultured, smart, handsome, and wears a sixpack. Every honorable character knows the right thing to do, when to do it, how to do it, why it needs to be done. Like the black-belt karate expert / Cormac McCarthy-reading academic / honors med student / model, who's kidnapped and repeatedly raped by a serial killer, then falls 30 yards into a shallow rocky stream, and hours later joins the FBI on the killer's manhunt.

    What sniveling, pathetic, horrid trash.

    Picked this up hoping for a complex and addictive Dragon Tattoo thriller, or perhaps even some cheap and fun David Goodis-styled pulp, but no. This was Mills & Boon trash.

  • Sentimental Surrealist

    In the entire history of my mature reading, spanning back to when I picked up

    at 15, I don't think I've ever read a single sentence as soul-crushingly, brain-batteringly, rage-inducingly

    as "He made a noise. It sounded like 'yaaaaaaagh.'"

    HE MADE. A NOISE. IT SOUNDED. LIKE. "YAAAAAAAGH."

    Readers of popular fiction, this is what your favorite authors think of you. They think you're only capable of processing things at a fourth-grade level, that simply having a character shout "YA

    In the entire history of my mature reading, spanning back to when I picked up

    at 15, I don't think I've ever read a single sentence as soul-crushingly, brain-batteringly, rage-inducingly

    as "He made a noise. It sounded like 'yaaaaaaagh.'"

    HE MADE. A NOISE. IT SOUNDED. LIKE. "YAAAAAAAGH."

    Readers of popular fiction, this is what your favorite authors think of you. They think you're only capable of processing things at a fourth-grade level, that simply having a character shout "YAAAAAAGH" isn't enough; emphasis has to be placed on how the noise

    yagh, but didn't necessarily have to be yagh, it could've been something closely related like "yargh" or even "yogh." People who write sentences like that shouldn't be allowed publishing deals, they should be sent back to freshman creative writing class and kept there until they never type a sentence like that again. Of course, it might not be the fault of Patterson, but of his small army of ghost writers...

    And don't tell me it's just pulp fiction. Raymond Chandler wouldn't write a sentence like that. If Philip Marlowe was real, he'd probably give Patterson a smack for that one. It's just asinine. There are plenty more sentences like that, and bad sentences aren't even the worst thing about the four chapters of this book I read before I set it down in disgust; the holy-shit italics and flat characterization just might be even more painful. Is this really how low the bar for popular fiction sits? I'll stick to the literary stuff, thanks.

  • Krystin Rachel

    This is my second time reading this and I have to admit I'm having a bit of an existential crisis. Because, like, I used to genuinely enjoy this? I

    to re-read this to scrub my brain clean from all the

    cheese-barf. I was thinking, "yeah some classic Patterson will fix me right up."

    I used to think this was good! I used to devour the Alex Cross series when I was 14/15, and fully evolving my love for murder and mayhem as a mature reader. I would close a book thinking,

    This is my second time reading this and I have to admit I'm having a bit of an existential crisis. Because, like, I used to genuinely enjoy this? I

    to re-read this to scrub my brain clean from all the

    cheese-barf. I was thinking, "yeah some classic Patterson will fix me right up."

    I used to think this was good! I used to devour the Alex Cross series when I was 14/15, and fully evolving my love for murder and mayhem as a mature reader. I would close a book thinking,

    But no, guys, seriously, so bad.

    It's absolute shit. I have seen the light!

    James Patterson is single highhandedly murdering the mystery-thriller genre, no pun intended.

    His prose are atrocious. There is zero depth to his plotting. There's is no less than 2 overwrought cliches per page. And if you think female characters should exist as anything more than cardboard caricatures, then look elsewhere! Because here, here we only have room for stereotypes and sexual objectification.

    with perfect women and his alter ego with a big dick. And the killers get to act out his sadistic side.

    Now, I know some people will disagree. Patterson has a lot of fans. But, you know, they obviously have no taste. Okay, I said it. Just kidding (kind of). But seriously, you can (and should) seek out better authors in this genre. Let good prose and clever plotting blow your casual reader minds.

    First of all, the level of pulp in the tone of the writing had me thinking nothing but:

    It's pure "Fast Talking High Trousers."

    Second,

    Honestly, it made me uncomfortable. I'm constantly complaining (I even annoy myself, really) about how the

    characters do not interact with each other like normal human beings. I thought this was because Patterson can't write women, but now I'm starting to think he just can't right humans. Period. The dialogue is laughable at best, uncomfortable at a bare minimum.

    Alex Cross comes across as the creepy uncle you avoided at family events as a little girl. The way he speaks to his niece is very much "come over here and sit on Uncle Alex's lap." He's in the middle of a serious serial murder investigation and he's constantly thinking about whether a victim, who's face is still busted open, wants to fuck him.

    The women in this story exist purely to be victims and sexual objects. From Alex's erection leading him everywhere he goes, to the two psycho killers (written as so ridiculously prepared and intelligent and sexy it's honestly stupid,) who are "loving" women by anally raping them with snakes - yes, snakes. Anal. With snakes.

    I like dark and twisty, don't get me wrong.

    It needs to propel the story forward or trigger a character's change, or revelation, that

    something. There is creating a dark human experience that touches readers, and then there is sadistic shit that is just a means to shock.

    so little character development, that the brutal shit doesn't have a human counter-point. It is all just misogynistic nightmare play.

    The only character Patterson gives any attention to is Alex - but only in a very surface way, so you are constantly reminded about how fuckinggggg awesomeeeeee he is *eyeroll*.

    He's a damn good cop. So good, the FBI wants him. He's damn sexy too. Just count how many times he references looking like Ali. And he's a damn good father. Oh, there's nothing he wouldn't do for those kids. He's a damn good son. A damn good brother. A damn good psychologist - just watch him blow the minds of the other cops around him with his pedestrian insights into Casanova and the Gentleman Caller. It's almost as if he took a Psych 101 online course.

    My god, he's just so damn good at everything! Even making sweet sweet love.

    I can almost see Patterson getting his rocks off writing this trash.

    A real sentence:

    Patterson is richer than any of us could ever dream to be. And he got there off of

    ??

    I need a shower for my brain. And Patterson needs to be sent back to creative writing class.

    Hate-readers to the left. That's where I'll be.

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