Prince Caspian

Prince Caspian

The Pevensie siblings are back to help a prince denied his rightful throne as he gathers an army in a desperate attempt to rid his land of a false king. But in the end, it is a battle of honor between two men alone that will decide the fate of an entire world....

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Title:Prince Caspian
Author:C.S. Lewis
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Edition Language:English

Prince Caspian Reviews

  • Amanda

    November 19, 2008. I've read these books a zillion and one times and surely I shall read them a zillion more. Because every single time, I realize new truths and find more honor in their pages.

    Today, I've read a passage that I find disturbing and quite out of character for CS Lewis:

    p.72

    November 19, 2008. I've read these books a zillion and one times and surely I shall read them a zillion more. Because every single time, I realize new truths and find more honor in their pages.

    Today, I've read a passage that I find disturbing and quite out of character for CS Lewis:

    p.72

    Seems a bit racist, if you ask me. It really makes me wonder exactly what CS Lewis is getting at here. It's totally the opposite of what happens in

    when Aslan sorts the good guys from the bad guys by whether they're good oir evil in their hearts. So anyway, it seems weird and I don't like it. The Hag does ends up being a bad guy in the end, but still... I dunno.

    I'll keep reading and blame the racism on the 1950s for now.

    Oh yeah, as a side note, whenever I read British literature, I talk to myself in a British accent and rhythm for a while afterward. It's so dorky!!!

    Later...

    I've read a bit more now. The race issue didn't come up again.

    The battle scenes are not the same as you might see these days. There's something more frank and quick about them. Lewis doesn't explain every little move and maneuver, so in fact, if you're reading too fast, you might even miss a fight going on. Here's an example of a battle overview without much in the way of specifics:

    P. 187

    I think if this book had been written today by a different author, it might be about 500 pages of battle scenes. I'm glad its not. Instead, the book is more about people standing on the side of good. Here's a passage that I just love which describes Edmund who may be a boy, but is also a king:

    P.174

    Ahhhhh... See? For Narnia and the North!

    Also, you Tolkien fans will recognize the onslaught of trees which comes in at the end of the battle--Two Towers--and the river emerging (with the help of Bacchus and his grapevines) to take out the bridge and thwart the enemy in its path--Fellowship. Who came up with it first, I wonder... :)

    Later still...

    As I finish reading this lovely little novel, allow me to

    Thank you, Mr. Lewis. I

    had a time.

  • Elaina

    Ahhh!! I just love these books so much!! ^_^ They make you feel like you are watching a movie in your head while you are reading every word! (If that makes any sense lol) I love the little bits of humor that C.S. Lewis through in every once and a while like this quote,

    I don't know why I love that quote so much, but I do :p

    Ahhh!! I just love these books so much!! ^_^ They make you feel like you are watching a movie in your head while you are reading every word! (If that makes any sense lol) I love the little bits of humor that C.S. Lewis through in every once and a while like this quote,

    I don't know why I love that quote so much, but I do :p I definitely recommend this series and of course, the movies are amazing as well! :) I really hope that they make a movie for the Silver Chair soon! Now onto the Voyage of the Dawn Treader next! :D

  • Sophia Triad

    One year has passed since Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy went to Narnia through an old Wardrobe and met the bad white witch and the righteous lion. Now they are sitting on a seat at a railway station with trunks and playboxes piled up round them on their way to school.

    But Narnia needs them back.

    More precisely PRINCE CASPIAN, the true king of Narnia needs them back.

    And the children are ready for a new adventure in the land that thousand - years ago they used to be Kings and Queens themselves.

    One year has passed since Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy went to Narnia through an old Wardrobe and met the bad white witch and the righteous lion. Now they are sitting on a seat at a railway station with trunks and playboxes piled up round them on their way to school.

    But Narnia needs them back.

    More precisely PRINCE CASPIAN, the true king of Narnia needs them back.

    And the children are ready for a new adventure in the land that thousand - years ago they used to be Kings and Queens themselves.

    Because time passes at different speeds in Narnia.

    And now the landscape has changed and the men are ruling the fairytale land. The talking animals and the mythical creatures are hiding trying to survive. Everyone remembers Narnia's golden age and everyone is hoping that a just King will appear and will bring prosperity and safety again to the rightful population of Narnia.

    There two stories in this book that mingle: The story of the prince Caspian and how he claims this throne and the story of the four children’s return to Narnia. It may look confusing when you read it, but everything will make sense after a certain point in the book.

    Sometimes The Chronicles of Narnia remind me the Neverending Story.

  • Ahmad Sharabiani

    Prince Caspian: the return to Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #2)

    عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 2: شاهزاده کاسپین؛ نویسنده: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس ( 1898 - 1963 ) مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، 1379؛ در 208 ص؛ شابک: 9647100043؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ هفت جلد در 1368 صفحه؛ موضوع: داستانهای خیال انگیز برای نوجوانان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م

    مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان خامنه؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 284 ص؛ شابک: 9644178521؛

    مترجم: مهناز داوودی؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387؛ در 200 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890877؛

    خرسه

    Prince Caspian: the return to Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #2)

    عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 2: شاهزاده کاسپین؛ نویسنده: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس ( 1898 - 1963 ) مترجم: امید اقتداری؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ تهران، 1379؛ در 208 ص؛ شابک: 9647100043؛ چاپ سوم 1384؛ هفت جلد در 1368 صفحه؛ موضوع: داستانهای خیال انگیز برای نوجوانان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م

    مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان خامنه؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 284 ص؛ شابک: 9644178521؛

    مترجم: مهناز داوودی؛ تهران، پنجره، 1387؛ در 200 ص؛ شابک: 9789648890877؛

    خرسهای شکم گنده، خیلی مشتاق بودند که، اول ضیافت برگزار شود، و گردهمایی بماند برای بعد. شاید برای فردا. ص 79 س 17 کتاب

  • Patrick

    I read this aloud to my older boy, age 6.

    It's a good book, and he enjoyed it, but didn't ring the bell in the same way Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe did. I think the biggest reason for this, was that it wasn't as accessible to him.

    The first issue was the non-linear story. Which has the potential to confuse. Later, Lewis splits the party in a way that divides the action in the story.

    But the biggest issue is that the characters lapse into archaic, courtly English when the a bunch of the people are

    I read this aloud to my older boy, age 6.

    It's a good book, and he enjoyed it, but didn't ring the bell in the same way Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe did. I think the biggest reason for this, was that it wasn't as accessible to him.

    The first issue was the non-linear story. Which has the potential to confuse. Later, Lewis splits the party in a way that divides the action in the story.

    But the biggest issue is that the characters lapse into archaic, courtly English when the a bunch of the people are talking at the end of the book. (Because the siblings used to be kings and queens, and they're talking with the nobility of the Telemarines.)

    It's not just unfamiliar language to children. It's unfamiliar and archaic language. (Doubly archaic now, as Lewis wrote these 50 years ago.) My boy couldn't follow it at all, as there were 2-4 unfamiliar terms used in every sentence, and context can only stretch so far.) Because of that, Oot couldn't understand whole sections of the climax of the book, when the Telmarines were talking among themselves, and planning on betraying their king. (A vital plot point he couldn't get because it was only made explicit in this dialogue.)

    As a result, I had to skim, skip, or summarize big chunks of the book so he could get it. Maybe in a year or two, he would have been fine. (Also, keep in mind that my boy is extremely vocabulary. We've been reading to him since he was six months old. Results with your own child may vary.)

    Sexism a little more present here, but not oppressive or malicious. Still, you can't deny that the boys go off to duel and do battle stuff, while the girls hang out with Aslan and go wake the trees.

    This book had better characters that the first book of the series. Nikabrik is a great example of a good guy gone bad. Trumpkin and Trufflehunter are great as well.

    But Reepicheep is the real star here. Perhaps the best character in all of Narnia, excepting Aslan himself.

    Lastly, and mostly as a side note, Lewis really knocked it out of the park in terms of names. Nikabrik is a great name for a venomous black dwarf. Glenstorm the proud centaur. Wimbleweather the dim but kind giant.

    And Reepicheep, of course. I don't know if a name has ever fit a character better than "Reepicheep" does....

  • Dannii Elle

    This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order.

    From the very first line I knew I was sure to love this book as it details the return of the Pevensie children from

    , the most famous and my most beloved Narnia tale. Only one year later in the human world, and centuries later in Narnian time, the children return to find their beloved castle an ivy-clad ruin and th

    This is my fourth journey into the fantastical lands of Narnia, as I have chosen to read the series in chronological rather than publication order.

    From the very first line I knew I was sure to love this book as it details the return of the Pevensie children from

    , the most famous and my most beloved Narnia tale. Only one year later in the human world, and centuries later in Narnian time, the children return to find their beloved castle an ivy-clad ruin and the land they knew and loved altered beyond all recognition. Another form of evil has taken control of the lands and the children must once again work with the magical Narnian beasts to free it from the tyrant's control.

    Whilst I adored the actual story, some elements of it did make me wince a little. Referring to some little girls as 'plump' and mentioning their 'fat legs' seemed like an unnecessary addition to the text but I also need to remember that these books weren't penned in this century, where such writing is unacceptable.

    This entire series touches me on such a deep emotional level, despite the simplicity of the tales. It is such a wonderful feeling to read something that ends with such purity and goodness. I think this is the magic of reading stories aimed at children: in the adult genre this suspended belief would not be tolerated and the 'happily ever afters' would not be believed. We often look for more complex conclusions, but it is so refreshing to read something where good is sure to conquer evil and be content that all that is wrong will be rightfully restored.

  • Whitney Atkinson

    I'm mad at myself because I wanted to read the first of the Narnia series before reading this one for class, but I didn't quite make it.

    I loved this story because I love Lucy and Aslan and Caspian, but there were a lot of side characters who I didn't care much about and the villain in this book wasn't so interesting. Nevertheless, a muuuuch easier read than Lord of the Rings!!

  • P

    Admittedly Prince Caspian was boring at first for I didn't like the symbolic meaning of the whole book. It was hard to read and that incredible ending nearly shut me out from enjoying, it's abrupt and unsatisfied at all. Although I quie liked the movie, the book is so much different. The pace is excruciatingly slow. I didn't like the over-descriptive narration talking about everything including flowers, sky, and trees.

    Admittedly Prince Caspian was boring at first for I didn't like the symbolic meaning of the whole book. It was hard to read and that incredible ending nearly shut me out from enjoying, it's abrupt and unsatisfied at all. Although I quie liked the movie, the book is so much different. The pace is excruciatingly slow. I didn't like the over-descriptive narration talking about everything including flowers, sky, and trees.

    The first part of this book was acceptable, especially when Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy comes back to Narnia, the vibes of the book is nearly the same as the previous one. But around the middle, the story was a downfall, there're so many subtle meanings between the pages, it gave me such a headache that I had to think about it many times.

    However, this book isn't awful. It has the enjoyable parts to keep my attention until the last page. Prince Caspian is as intriguing as always, so much alike his character in the movie.

  • Barry Pierce

    with badgers.

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